Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

Risotto is a dish that is creamy, scrumptious and filling.

The beauty of preparing risotto is that you can add just about anything you’d like.

You can use various types of vegetables, herbs, and meat. You can make with or without meat.

Risotto is a comfort food, as it is filling, and is a wonderful dish for leftovers.

Risotto can be a side dish (without meat) but it is also often consumed as a complete meal (when prepared with meat).


Pumpkin Pecan Risotto with Dried Cranberries and Goat Cheese


Unlike other rice that is left in a pot of water to boil, risotto rice requires constant attention to ensure a perfectly finished dish.

The rice is not to be pre-rinsed, boiled, or drained, as washing would remove much of the starch required for a creamy texture.

When Arborio rice is cooked slowly with stock (usually chicken or vegetable stock) it allows the amylopectin starch to be released.

As a result, the rice takes on a smooth, creamy texture.

A 1/3 cup of uncooked Arborio rice (used in preparing risotto) has about 166 calories.

Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

4 pieces bacon

1/2 yellow onion, diced

2 cups arborio rice

4 cups chicken stock, hot

1 cup frozen peas and carrots

1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Zest of 1 lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

Cut bacon into small bite-sized pieces. Add to a large, deep, skillet and cook until crispy. Remove from pan to cool.

Drain most of the bacon grease, leaving about 1 Tbsp. in the pan. Add diced onions and cook on low heat until translucent.

Turn heat to medium and add uncooked rice to the pan. Stir to coat in bacon grease.

Add 1 cup hot chicken stock, reduce heat to low and stir while rice absorbs the liquid. Once it’s absorbed, add another 1 cup and repeat until all the liquid is gone and rice is tender.

This process should take about 20 minutes.

Next, add to tender rice frozen peas and carrots, lemon zest, cilantro and bacon. Mix in well.

Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve warm.

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Tender flaky wild caught Alaskan salmon, prepared with a honey-miso glaze, that delicately sits over a bed of silky noodles, mango, avocado, radicchio, carrots, mint, basil, and peanuts tossed with a tasty refreshing vinaigrette.

It is a long list of fresh ingredients, but do not let the long list deter you.

If you are able to boil noodles, tear mint, shredded vegetables and open an oven door, you can handle this wonderfully delicious Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl.

What Is Radicchio

Radicchio, also known as Italian chicory, is a type of leafy chicory featuring dark reddish-purple leaves and white veins.

Though commonly mistaken for red cabbage or lettuce, radicchio has a distinctly bitter taste that goes well with many Italian dishes.

It’s a traditional ingredient in the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes whole plant foods.

What Ramen Noodles To Use

Ramen noodles are made with wheat flour that can be cooked and dehydrated after frying.

On the other hand, fresh ramen noodles are made with a combination of eggs, wheat, and alkalized water.

Why alkalized water? Alkaline water helps to give that unique and special springy texture to the noodles.

Fresh Made Ramon Noodles

These noodles also have that slurping texture because it’s made with the combination of gluten flour and higher protein count as well.

These noodles have yellow tones that are available in straight and wavy forms.

Some scientific research, though not conclusive, has suggested that consuming instant ramen noodles two or more times a week can increase the likelihood of developing heart disease, as well as diabetes and stroke, especially in women.

To make a fresh Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl, we suggest using all fresh ingredients, including fresh, not dehydrated, Ramon noodles.

Making homemade fresh Ramon Noodles – Image source: Cilantro and Citronella

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Miso Salmon

4 6-ounce wild-caught sockeye salmon filets

1 tablespoon white (shiro) miso

1 teaspoon sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Vinaigrette

1/4 cup lime juice

1/4 cup peanut oil

1 tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon lite soy sauce

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon toasted sesame soil

1 teaspoon chili paste, optional

1 teaspoon lime zest, grated

1 garlic clove, minced

1 1/2 inch ginger, peeled and grated

The Bowl

8 ounces ramen or lo mein noodles

2 cups arugula

1 cup watercress, stems removed

1 cup radicchio, finely shredded

2 medium carrots, peeled and grated

2 fresno chilies, thinly sliced

1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro

1/2 cup loosely packed mint leaves, torn

1/2 cup loosely packed basil, torn

1/4 cup roasted and salted peanuts

1 large mango, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 hass avocado, cut into 1-inch cubes

Scallions, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Place salmon on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

In a bowl, mix to combine miso, vinegar, and honey. Brush mixture onto salmon evenly and top each filet with sesame seeds.

Roast salmon for 10 to 12 minutes (10 minutes for medium-rare / 12 minutes for medium) until it easily flakes with a fork.

While the salmon is cooking, boil the ramen noodles according to the package instructions. When complete, rinse briefly with cool water to stop the cooking process.

To make the vinaigrette, whisk lime juice, peanut oil, fish sauce, soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, chili paste, lime zest, garlic, and ginger in a bowl.

In a large bowl, toss to combine noodles, arugula, watercress, radicchio, carrots, chilies, cilantro, mint, basil, peanuts, and vinaigrette. Add mango and avocado and gently toss.

Fresh Ramon Noodles

Divide noodles into serving bowls, top with salmon, and garnish with scallions.

Serve with a squeeze of lime if desired.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Sprouts

Asian pears, also known as apple pears, are a healthy treat that present the best qualities of both the apple and pear.

The fruit is crunchy and sweet fruit that grows to be round like an apple. They do not change texture after picking or storage as do European pears such as the Bartlett or Comice.

Chilling Asian pearsChilling an Asian pear before eating can enhance the delicious flavor.

Asian Pear Health Benefits

According to OAW Health – if you have any of the following health problems, they suggest adding pears to your diet with these few noted health issues among many others:

• Acid reflux

• High cholesterol

• Gas – bloating – constipation – diarrhea

• Intestinal inflammation

• Insulin resistance

• Weight gain

What To Do With The Asian Pear

The pear is often given as a gift throughout East Asia, due to its long shelf-life and delicious flavor.

Because of its wonderful texture, you can enjoy these pears in stir-fries, as well as salads.

And how ironic, as the Asian pear is also called a “salad pear” in Japan.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Sprouts

1 cup daikon radish sprouts

2 cups Asian pears, washed and corded and chop into medium sized pieces

1 1/2 tbsp rice wine vinegar

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes chili flakes

1/8 tsp white pepper

2 1/2 tbsp raw honey

Combine vinegar, red pepper flakes, white pepper and honey – mix well until honey dissolves. Add Asian pear, daikon radish sprouts and carrot.

Mix well and set aside for flavors to meld for at least one hour.

Can be made up to a day in advance and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Serve at room temperature.

Goan Coconut Chicken Curry with Spiraled Sweet Potato

The Indian region of Goa is known for its tropical beaches and rich seafood curries.

This region of India is known for their Goan simmer sauces. They can be medium spiced to very spicy.

The flavors in this sauce include coconut, ginger, and tangy tamarind. Together they taste incredible when simmered with meat and vegetables.

The meats can include, lamb, goat and chicken. The vegetables can be an endless choice, such as broccoli, peas, carrots, onions, and cabbage.

Goan Coconut Chicken Curry with Spiraled Sweet Potato

1 lbs. boneless chicken thighs, cut into cubes

1/2 cup coconut milk

Salt to taste

1/4 tsp. turmeric powder

1 tbsp. lemon juice

2 tbsp. oil

1 1/2 tbsp. ginger-garlic paste finely chopped

1 medium yellow onion

1 tsp. Garam masala powder

1/2 tsp. red chili Red chilli powder

1 tsp. cumin powder

2-3 cups chicken stock

In a medium bowl add chicken, salt, turmeric powder and lemon juice and mix well. Set aside for 10 minutes.

Heat oil in a pan over medium heat. Add ginger-garlic paste, stir and sauté well. Add onion, mix and sauté on high heat till translucent.

Add chicken mix and stir in and cook for 1 minute. Add garam masala powder, chilli powder and cumin powder, stir in and cook till the oil separates.

Add chicken stock, stir to mix, cover and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Add coconut milk, mix well and simmer for 3-4 minutes.

In another pan over medium heat add 1 tbsp. oil. Next add spiraled sweet potatoes and cook just to warm spirals.

Next add warmed spirals to Goan sauce and mix in.

Plate and top with chopped spring onions, chopped cilantro and goat cheese.

Look how mouth watering delicious it is.

Cashew Pork and Vegetable Stir-Fry

China is the number one pork consumer around the world. Every year, nearly half of the world’s pork is eaten by the Chinese.

The Chinese not only love pork but also are good at cooking pork. The methods they use are stir-fried, steamed, boiled, and braised. They love their flavorings as well. Such as salty, sweet, and spicy.

The Stir-Fried Method

Stir-frying is a a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil (usually peanut oil) while being stirred or tossed in a wok.

The technique originated in China and has spread into other parts of Asia and the West.

The English-language term “stir-fry” was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao’s book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945).

Though you don’t absolutely need one, a wok is the one piece of cooking equipment you may want to purchase if you plan to cook stir-fries on a regular basis.

Using A Wok To Make Chinese Stir-Fries

Cashew Pork and Vegetable Stir-Fry

1 pound pork tenderloin

2 large carrots, sliced into match sticks

2 celery ribs, sliced into match sticks

1/2 cup cashews

2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

SAUCE:

1 tablespoon grated orange zest

3/4 cup orange juice

1 tablespoon cornstarch

3 tablespoons soy sauce

1/3 cup corn syrup

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Directions

Cut tenderloin into thin strips and set aside.

Combine sauce ingredients and mix well.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil. Add sliced vegetables and stir-fry for 3 minutes. Remove vegetables and set aside.

Add remaining oil to skillet. Add pork and stir-fry for 3 minutes.

Return vegetables to pan with sauce and cashews. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until thickened.

Serve with rice if desired.

How To Prepare Thai Food With These Key Ingredients

Collage of thai food - How To Prepare Thai Food With These Key Ingredients Thai food is internationally famous. Thai cuisine is essentially a union of centuries-old Eastern and Western influences harmoniously combined into something uniquely Thai.

A prepared dinner table with a Thai meal placed on it, consists of a spicy or non-spicy soup, a curry dish with condiments, a dip with accompanying fish and vegetables, and there could also be a spiced salad.

Thai food has evolved much like Indian food, meaning the cooks or chefs take great care so there is a harmony of flavors and textures with each individual dish. One dish must compliment the other dishes positioned at the dinner table.

What is needed in your kitchen to make a great Thai dish? You need to know the “Key Ingredients.”

Key Ingredients Needed To Prepare Thai Food

When you dicide to make a Thai dish, the following is what you should find in your refrigerator or pantry.

Banana Leaves

Fresh banana leaves are used to wrap steamed fish, giving them a herbaceous flavor. Thai people also use banana leaves as cooking vessels, folding them into a shape that will hold and cook the food, and as “to-go” containers.

Idea: How To Make Banana Leaf Bowls by: Escape To Paradise 

Lemongrass

You can buy lemongrass fresh in thick grassy bundles or minced or chopped in jars or possibly the freezer section of your favorite Asian market.

RecipeLemongrass Basil Thai Chicken

thai lime leaves

Thai Lime Leaves

Lime Leaves

The leaves are a glossy dark green color, and are used to flavor curries, soups, fish cakes and even teas for its fragrant herbal notes.

Thai Basil 

This variety of basil professes a subtle sweet anise flavor.

The leaves are dark green with purple stems.

If you are not able to find Thai basil at your favorite market, Holy basil will do.

Recipe: Thai Chicken Stir-Fry with Holy Basil

Fish Sauce 

In Thailand, fish sauce is called nam pla, which is prepared from salted fish. Fish sauce can be used as a condiment, which can be savory and a reddish-brown in color. Fish sauce is ubiquitous in Thai cooking.

Recipe: Pad Thai Noodles with Chicken – (recipe uses fish sauce)

Green Papaya Fruit

Image credit: Photo Elsoar

Green Papaya

The green papaya is foot ball shaped. It is a fruit that makes the spicy, crunchy salad, “som tum” sought after to calm a hungry stomach.

An unripe green mango can be used in place of the green papaya when unable to find it at the market.

Tamarind Puree

Bowl of Sour Curry Prawns with Cha-Om Omelette

Image credit: Pranees Thai Kitchen – Sour Curry Prawns with Cha-Om (using tamarind puree)

This puree is made from the fruit pods of the tamarind tree, and it is referred to as “sour tamarind soup base” or “nuoc me chua.”

When purchasing the tamarind puree, you can find it in sticky 14 ounce blocks. The thai use the puree, by diluting 1 ounce pureed pulp with 1/3 cup warm water, and then strained.

You can also buy it ready made and jarred with no need of diluting it. There is also a concentrated tamarind that is thick and molasses like. It also needs to be diluted.

The concentrated tamarind is said to have a sour taste that can be overpowering in Pad Thai.

Link here to learn how to make your own homemade tamarind puree by: Pranees Thai Kitchen

Recipe: Thai Food Soup: Gang Som Cha Om Kai  – by Joy’s Thai Food

Thai Chili Peppers

These peppers are small in shape, green and red in color, and fiery in taste. Though as spicy as the chili maybe, it is said the chili gives a subtle fruity flavor when used in Thai cooking. If Thai chilis are too much for your palate, you can use Serrano peppers instead.

Dried Shrimp

Small little dried shrimp add salty flavor to noodle dishes and salads. Dried shrimp can keep indefinitely in a cool dark place within an airtight container.

Having these key ingredients used in authentic Thai cooking in your pantry or refrigerator, will always be at your reach in a moments notice. If unable to find them at your favorite grocers, try looking for them in an Asian market.

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Curried Chicken With Dried Cherries

Curried Chicken and Dried Cherries - over head viewHave you ever heard of the Curry Tree? It is a tropical to sub-tropical tree in the rue family, which also includes the citrus. The tree is native to India and Sri Lanka.

Curry Leaf Tree

curry leaves in a skillet with olive oil

Curry Leaves In A Skillet With Olive Oil

The leaves of the curry tree are used in many Indian dishes. The “sweet neem leaves” are often used in curries, as they (the leaves) are highly valued as a seasoning in southern and west-coast Indian cooking, as well as Sri Lankan cooking .

The leaves when used in curry dishes are add with the chopped onion in the first stage of the preparation of the curry dish.

potted curry leaf tree

Image Credit: Garden Amateur

The tree can be home-raised as a potted plant as it is easily grown in warmer areas of the world, or in containers where the climate is not supportive outdoors. In this image is a potted Curry tree in the yard of an Australian gardener.

Our featured dish is  – Curried Chicken With Dried Cherries – and here is what you will need, and no you will not need to hunt down some curry leaves. Unless you have a tree and want to add some leaves to the dish we are featuring.

3/4 pound skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch chunks 

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon avocado oil

1 small red or purple onion, thinly sliced

2 ribs celery, sliced

1/2 cup fresh water or chicken broth

1/3 cup chopped dried cherries

1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder

1/2 to 1 teaspoon Himalayan Salt (optional)

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/3 cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons flour

cooking chicken meatIn a large ceramic coated skillet or cast iron skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of avocado oil over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook, stir occasionally until meat is oblique colored and just cooked through, about 5 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate, and set aside.

cooking onions and celeryTo the same pan add the 1 teaspoon of avocado oil and heat over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sliced celery and cook, stirring for 3 minutes.

adding curry and dried cherriesNext add the cherries and 1/2 cup water and bring to a light boil. Next stir in the curry powder, salt and pepper.

Next, pour in the cream and mix in. You can also use coconut milk, which is used in traditional Indian dishes. When making this dish, we didn’t have any coconut milk, but we did have some heavy cream.

adding in chicken meat to curry mixNext add the cooked chicken along with any juices and mix in.

Curried Chicken and Dried CherriesServe over rice, couscous or eat as is.

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Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas

Orecchiette with Chorizo and ChickpeasThe first time we used pasta Orecchiette was around 2009. We had seen a recipe in a food magazine using the pasta, so to the store we went. We had a hard time finding it, but our local co-op (sell’s all natural – organic foods) had the pasta. When we described the pasta (as we had forgotten the name) the sales lady new right away what we wanted. She referred to the pasta as little pope hats. Ever since Orechiette has become a staple in our pantry.

About.com talks on Italian food and describes Orechiette as a distinctive Puglian type of pasta shaped roughly like small ears, as orecchio in Italian means eat, and Orecchiette means little ears. The pasta is roughly 3/4 of an inch across, slightly domed, and the centers are thinner than the rim of the pasta. The pastas texture is soft in the middle and more chewy along the rim or outside of the pasta.

Barilla (store brand that sells Italian products) says that Orecchiette is the signature pasta of Puglia, describing Puglia as a humble farming land situated along the southeastern coast of Italy.

Here is a video posted to You-Tube of Italian women in Italy making fresh Orechiette pasta.
Now for our featured recipe: Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas, and here is what you will need.

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 small shallots, chopped

3/4 pound fresh Mexican chorizo, casings removed

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 cups chicken broth

1 15-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed

12 ounces Orecchiette

Garnishes:

Fresh chopped cilantro or parsley

Finely grated Parmesan and lemon zest

cooking Mexican chorizoHeat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots and saute, stirring often, until beginning to brown and smell fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add chorizo to pan and break up with a spoon, and cook meat until browned and cooked through, about 5-7 minutes.

adding chickpeas to meat sauceNext add tomato paste and red pepper flakes to meat mixture and mix in. Next add the broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is thickened a bit, about 15-20 minutes. Next add the can of chickpeas, and mix in, cooking 2 minutes more to heat the chickpeas through.

adding orechiette to meat sauceMeanwhile, cook pasta according to packaged instructions. Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid.

Next add the pasta and 1/2 cup pasta cooking liquid to meat sauce. Continue to cook until sauce thickens and coats pasta, about 3 minutes. Add the pasta liquid as needed. You might use the whole cup, and possibly less.

Orecchiette with Chorizo and Chickpeas in the panServe pasta topped with cilantro or parsley (your choice), Parmesan, and lemon zest.

Orecchiette with Chorizo and ChickpeasWe have had this for left overs a few times, and each time we add cilantro, cheese, and lemon zest. The zest adds great flavor to this dish. Be sure to use it.

For the side salad using candy cane beets, see our recipe here: Shredded Candy Cane and Green Apple Slaw with Pecans.

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Teriyaki Chicken with Vegetables

Teriyaki Chicken with Vegetables

Chicken Teriyaki  is a very popular Japanese food in the US.  Teriyaki in Japanese means “grilled with shine.”  Sugar in teriyaki sauce gives a shine to the food, making it not only delicious, but also looks more appetizing.

It is very simple to make teriyaki sauce, as it is a mixture of only three ingredients, soy sauce, sugar, and sake. You can also use mirin for a sweeter teriyaki.  One of the advantages of making the sauce yourself is you can adjust the flavor the way you prefer.  Also making your own, avoids the unnecessary chemicals in store bought teriyaki sauce.

 common-japanese-cooking-ingredientsAccording to Japanese Cooking 101, this is a list of common ingredients used in Japanese cuisine:

Aburaage
Aonori
Dashi
Dried Bonito Flakes (Katsuobushi)
Dried Shiitake Mushroom
Mirin
Miso Paste
Nagaimo (Dioscorea opposita, Chinese yam)
Panko (Bread Crumbs)
Pickled Red Ginger (Benishouga)
Rice
Rice Vinegar
Roasted Seaweed (Sushi Nori)
Sake
Soy Sauce
Tonkatsu Sauce

It is not common in traditional Japanese cuisine to use garlic, though it is in Korean cooking.

Our featured recipe is a Teriyaki Chicken with Vegetables, though not an authentic recipe, but an American rendition.

homemade Teriyaki Sauce

Teriyaki Sauce

4 tablespoons tamari sauce  (works the same as soy sauce)

4 tablespoons mirin (can use sake for a less sweeter teriyaki sauce)

2 tablespoons coconut sugar (not used in Japanese cooking, can use white sugar if you wish)

2 teaspoons arrowroot (can also use cornstarch or potato starch)

2 tablespoons water

Mix together in a small sauce pan over medium heat, the first three ingredients. In a small cup mix together the water and arrowroot. Bring the pot to a slow boil and add the arrowroot-water mixture to the boiling pot. Stir in and continue to stir until the liquid thickens. Remove from heat and set aside.

Tamari is specifically a Japanese form of soy sauce, traditionally made as a by-product of miso paste. Tamari is a gluten-free product, were as soy sauce is not.

Now let’s prepare the meat and vegetables to mix with our homemade teriyaki sauce.

vegetables cut Julienne style4  tablespoons coconut oil (or sesame oil), divided

2 inch piece of fresh ginger, grated

3 green onions, chopped

2 carrots, cut julienne style

2 celery ribs, cut julienne style

8 asparagus spires, cut into 1 to 2 inch pieces

4 chicken breasts, skinless and bones, cut into 1 inch chunks

2-3 tablespoons sesame seeds

A traditional Japanese chicken teriyaki uses chicken thighs, and asparagus is not a vegetable normally used in Japanese cooking.

sauteing ginger and green onionsSaute the prepared ginger and green onions in the heated coconut oil (2 tablespoons) over medium heat in a large frying pan, until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Next add the carrots, celery, and asparagus, and continue to stir-fry until vegetables are just tender, about 10 minutes. Set aside.

cooking chicken thigh chunks in teriyaki sauceHeat a large frying pan over medium heat with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil, and add chopped meat and cook until meat is oblique. Next add the teriyaki sauce and mix in.

mixing in sesame seedsNext mix in the sesame seeds, and add the vegetables and mix in as well.

Teriyaki Chicken with VegetablesPlate and serve over white rice.

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Thai Chicken Stir-Fry with Holy Basil

Thai Chicken Stir fry with Holy Basil

Illness and conditions Holy Basil helps withHoly basil or Tulsi has medicinal properties. The leaves are used in Thailand for sharpen memory.

The leaves of holy basil are used during the rainy season, when malaria and dengue fever are widely prevalent.

The tender leaves are boiled with black tea, to use as a preventive against theses diseases.

A tea is also made from the leaves, and raw honey is added with fresh ginger as an effective remedy for bronchitis, asthma, influenza, cough and cold.

These little green leaves can also reduce blood cholesterol. Holy basil is also used as an anti-stress remedy.

Recent studies have shown that chewing 12 leaves of holy basil basil, twice a day, can help to fight stress.

Now for our featured recipe: Thai Chicken Stir-Fry with Holy Basil

avocado oil for Asian cooking - Thai Chicken with Holy Basil

Healthy Cooking to 500 Degrees

Cook 1 cup of your favorite rice according to package instructions (use chicken broth in place of water, provides more flavor for the dish).

2 tbsp. avocado oil

2 garlic cloves, crushed

8 ounces chicken breast, boneless and shredded into medium pieces

1 tbsp. red chili flakes

Red chili is a great source of beta-carotene, which is converted to vitamin-A to sponge cell damaging free radicals. The chili also helps reduce Red Chili Flakesinflammation and reduces blood clotting.

2 handfuls of holy basil

2 tbsp. fish sauce

1 tbsp. raw sugar

2 tbsp. chicken stock

Heat a wok (or similar pan) over medium heat. Add oil and garlic, stir-fry for a few seconds or until you smell the aroma of the garlic.

Turn up the heat to medium-high. Next add the chicken, chilli flakes, half of the basil, and stir-fry for 1 minute. Now add the fish sauce, raw sugar, and stock. Mix in well. Stir-fry until chicken is oblique.

Turn the heat to low, and add the rest of the basil. Stir-fry the contents of the wok or pan 30 seconds to 1 minute.

Plate some rice and spoon on top some Stir-Fried Chicken with Holy Basil and enjoy.

 

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