Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

Risotto is a dish that is creamy, scrumptious and filling.

The beauty of preparing risotto is that you can add just about anything you’d like.

You can use various types of vegetables, herbs, and meat. You can make with or without meat.

Risotto is a comfort food, as it is filling, and is a wonderful dish for leftovers.

Risotto can be a side dish (without meat) but it is also often consumed as a complete meal (when prepared with meat).


Pumpkin Pecan Risotto with Dried Cranberries and Goat Cheese


Unlike other rice that is left in a pot of water to boil, risotto rice requires constant attention to ensure a perfectly finished dish.

The rice is not to be pre-rinsed, boiled, or drained, as washing would remove much of the starch required for a creamy texture.

When Arborio rice is cooked slowly with stock (usually chicken or vegetable stock) it allows the amylopectin starch to be released.

As a result, the rice takes on a smooth, creamy texture.

A 1/3 cup of uncooked Arborio rice (used in preparing risotto) has about 166 calories.

Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

4 pieces bacon

1/2 yellow onion, diced

2 cups arborio rice

4 cups chicken stock, hot

1 cup frozen peas and carrots

1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Zest of 1 lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

Cut bacon into small bite-sized pieces. Add to a large, deep, skillet and cook until crispy. Remove from pan to cool.

Drain most of the bacon grease, leaving about 1 Tbsp. in the pan. Add diced onions and cook on low heat until translucent.

Turn heat to medium and add uncooked rice to the pan. Stir to coat in bacon grease.

Add 1 cup hot chicken stock, reduce heat to low and stir while rice absorbs the liquid. Once it’s absorbed, add another 1 cup and repeat until all the liquid is gone and rice is tender.

This process should take about 20 minutes.

Next, add to tender rice frozen peas and carrots, lemon zest, cilantro and bacon. Mix in well.

Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve warm.

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Tender flaky wild caught Alaskan salmon, prepared with a honey-miso glaze, that delicately sits over a bed of silky noodles, mango, avocado, radicchio, carrots, mint, basil, and peanuts tossed with a tasty refreshing vinaigrette.

It is a long list of fresh ingredients, but do not let the long list deter you.

If you are able to boil noodles, tear mint, shredded vegetables and open an oven door, you can handle this wonderfully delicious Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl.

What Is Radicchio

Radicchio, also known as Italian chicory, is a type of leafy chicory featuring dark reddish-purple leaves and white veins.

Though commonly mistaken for red cabbage or lettuce, radicchio has a distinctly bitter taste that goes well with many Italian dishes.

It’s a traditional ingredient in the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes whole plant foods.

What Ramen Noodles To Use

Ramen noodles are made with wheat flour that can be cooked and dehydrated after frying.

On the other hand, fresh ramen noodles are made with a combination of eggs, wheat, and alkalized water.

Why alkalized water? Alkaline water helps to give that unique and special springy texture to the noodles.

Fresh Made Ramon Noodles

These noodles also have that slurping texture because it’s made with the combination of gluten flour and higher protein count as well.

These noodles have yellow tones that are available in straight and wavy forms.

Some scientific research, though not conclusive, has suggested that consuming instant ramen noodles two or more times a week can increase the likelihood of developing heart disease, as well as diabetes and stroke, especially in women.

To make a fresh Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl, we suggest using all fresh ingredients, including fresh, not dehydrated, Ramon noodles.

Making homemade fresh Ramon Noodles – Image source: Cilantro and Citronella

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Miso Salmon

4 6-ounce wild-caught sockeye salmon filets

1 tablespoon white (shiro) miso

1 teaspoon sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Vinaigrette

1/4 cup lime juice

1/4 cup peanut oil

1 tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon lite soy sauce

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon toasted sesame soil

1 teaspoon chili paste, optional

1 teaspoon lime zest, grated

1 garlic clove, minced

1 1/2 inch ginger, peeled and grated

The Bowl

8 ounces ramen or lo mein noodles

2 cups arugula

1 cup watercress, stems removed

1 cup radicchio, finely shredded

2 medium carrots, peeled and grated

2 fresno chilies, thinly sliced

1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro

1/2 cup loosely packed mint leaves, torn

1/2 cup loosely packed basil, torn

1/4 cup roasted and salted peanuts

1 large mango, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 hass avocado, cut into 1-inch cubes

Scallions, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Place salmon on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

In a bowl, mix to combine miso, vinegar, and honey. Brush mixture onto salmon evenly and top each filet with sesame seeds.

Roast salmon for 10 to 12 minutes (10 minutes for medium-rare / 12 minutes for medium) until it easily flakes with a fork.

While the salmon is cooking, boil the ramen noodles according to the package instructions. When complete, rinse briefly with cool water to stop the cooking process.

To make the vinaigrette, whisk lime juice, peanut oil, fish sauce, soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, chili paste, lime zest, garlic, and ginger in a bowl.

In a large bowl, toss to combine noodles, arugula, watercress, radicchio, carrots, chilies, cilantro, mint, basil, peanuts, and vinaigrette. Add mango and avocado and gently toss.

Fresh Ramon Noodles

Divide noodles into serving bowls, top with salmon, and garnish with scallions.

Serve with a squeeze of lime if desired.

Goan Coconut Chicken Curry with Spiraled Sweet Potato

The Indian region of Goa is known for its tropical beaches and rich seafood curries.

This region of India is known for their Goan simmer sauces. They can be medium spiced to very spicy.

The flavors in this sauce include coconut, ginger, and tangy tamarind. Together they taste incredible when simmered with meat and vegetables.

The meats can include, lamb, goat and chicken. The vegetables can be an endless choice, such as broccoli, peas, carrots, onions, and cabbage.

Goan Coconut Chicken Curry with Spiraled Sweet Potato

1 lbs. boneless chicken thighs, cut into cubes

1/2 cup coconut milk

Salt to taste

1/4 tsp. turmeric powder

1 tbsp. lemon juice

2 tbsp. oil

1 1/2 tbsp. ginger-garlic paste finely chopped

1 medium yellow onion

1 tsp. Garam masala powder

1/2 tsp. red chili Red chilli powder

1 tsp. cumin powder

2-3 cups chicken stock

In a medium bowl add chicken, salt, turmeric powder and lemon juice and mix well. Set aside for 10 minutes.

Heat oil in a pan over medium heat. Add ginger-garlic paste, stir and sauté well. Add onion, mix and sauté on high heat till translucent.

Add chicken mix and stir in and cook for 1 minute. Add garam masala powder, chilli powder and cumin powder, stir in and cook till the oil separates.

Add chicken stock, stir to mix, cover and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Add coconut milk, mix well and simmer for 3-4 minutes.

In another pan over medium heat add 1 tbsp. oil. Next add spiraled sweet potatoes and cook just to warm spirals.

Next add warmed spirals to Goan sauce and mix in.

Plate and top with chopped spring onions, chopped cilantro and goat cheese.

Look how mouth watering delicious it is.

Hyderabadi Chicken Korma

Hyderabadi Chicken Korma

This delicious and flavorful chicken korma is everything you need to lift up your mood!

Hyderabadi Chicken Korma is an ultimate delight for chicken lovers!

The first korma recipe originated from the Indian Subcontinent back in the 16th century.

The word korma is derived from an Urdu word with the meaning “braise.”

Braising of meat is often referred to as pot roasting though some cooks make a distinction between the two methods, based on whether additional liquid is added.

Typically, the chicken korma recipe is known as a dish in which meat and veggies are braised with stock, water, and yogurt or cream.

The korma can be mildly spiced or fiery and can be made with chicken, meat, veal and beef.

Making Hyderabadi Chicken Korma

This Korma has tender chicken thigh meat pieces cooked in butter and is made using a melody of spices.

First we made the sauce, then we cooked the thigh meat pieces in butter then added the sauce and vegetables.

16 ounces chicken thigh pieces

2 onions, chopped

2 tomatoes, chopped

1 tbsp ginger-garlic paste

1 Bay leaf

3 Cardamom pods

1 inch cinnamon stick

2-3 Cloves

1/2 curd

15 cashews (soaked in warm water)

to taste salt

to taste red chilli powder

Grind tomatoes and cashews to make a paste, set aside.

In a medium fry pan over medium heat, sauté onions and ginger-garlic paste, about 1 minute.

Next add tomato-cashew paste, salt to taste and about 1/8 to 1/4 tap. red chilli powder

Mix until combined. Pour into a large measuring cup and set aside.

In medium fry pan over medium heat add butter until melted.

Next add chicken pieces and cook until chicken is oblique.

Next add the Hyderabadi Korma sauce and mix in. Then add 1cup peas and carrots and mix in.

Let cook for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to continue cooking another 5 minutes.

Close  up of Chicken  Korma

Plate server over rice. Here is plated the Chicken Korma over a Ginger Turmeric Rice.

Plated Chicken Korma over rice

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Cashew Pork and Vegetable Stir-Fry

China is the number one pork consumer around the world. Every year, nearly half of the world’s pork is eaten by the Chinese.

The Chinese not only love pork but also are good at cooking pork. The methods they use are stir-fried, steamed, boiled, and braised. They love their flavorings as well. Such as salty, sweet, and spicy.

The Stir-Fried Method

Stir-frying is a a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil (usually peanut oil) while being stirred or tossed in a wok.

The technique originated in China and has spread into other parts of Asia and the West.

The English-language term “stir-fry” was coined by Y.R. Chao in Buwei Yang Chao’s book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945).

Though you don’t absolutely need one, a wok is the one piece of cooking equipment you may want to purchase if you plan to cook stir-fries on a regular basis.

Using A Wok To Make Chinese Stir-Fries

Cashew Pork and Vegetable Stir-Fry

1 pound pork tenderloin

2 large carrots, sliced into match sticks

2 celery ribs, sliced into match sticks

1/2 cup cashews

2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

SAUCE:

1 tablespoon grated orange zest

3/4 cup orange juice

1 tablespoon cornstarch

3 tablespoons soy sauce

1/3 cup corn syrup

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Directions

Cut tenderloin into thin strips and set aside.

Combine sauce ingredients and mix well.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil. Add sliced vegetables and stir-fry for 3 minutes. Remove vegetables and set aside.

Add remaining oil to skillet. Add pork and stir-fry for 3 minutes.

Return vegetables to pan with sauce and cashews. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until thickened.

Serve with rice if desired.

Sesame Blood Orange Chicken

If you like crispy chicken and love the flavor of blood oranges, than you should give this chicken thigh recipe a try.

It’s coated in sesame seeds and baked until crispy then drenched in a sweet Asian inspired orange sauce.

And because blood oranges are in season, they were used in place of navel oranges.

As the name suggests, blood oranges are red in color, sometimes in splotches on the outside but definitely on the inside.

The concentration of the red inside depends on the particular type of orange and growing conditions.

Squeezing them is when you truly understand where the “blood” reference comes from, as the juice resembles the ruby red of a cranberry as opposed to the yellowish tone of regular orange juice.

The blood orange taste a lot like ordinary oranges only they’re slightly more bitter but less acidic.

Some types are actually sweeter than the average Navel or Valencia orange.

Blood oranges originated in Sicily and Spain and varieties include: Maltese, Moro, Sanguinelli, Scarlet Navel and Tarocco.

Nutritional Value Of Blood Oranges

Blood oranges contain a long list of antioxidants, including polyphenols, flavanones, anthocyanins, and ascorbic acid, which help in reducing oxidative stress in the body, according to a published study in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry .

Consuming these varieties of oranges increases vitamin C and zeaxanthin content in the body, helping to fight infections and improving overall health.

Blood oranges contain high amounts of Vitamin C. Up to 130% of the recommended daily amount.

The presence of vitamin C in blood oranges helps to prevent the risk of developing scurvy and reduce any other inflammation caused by oxidative stress, as published in the Pharmacognosy Magazine.

They also contain potassium, Vitamin A, iron, calcium, and fiber.

With their antioxidant properties, in particular one called anthocyanins, the oranges are said to be beneficial in lowering the risk of heart disease and certain types of cancer.

Sesame Blood Orange Chicken

8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs

1/2 cup tapioca or cornstarch

1/4 cup sesame seeds

2 tablespoons oil

ORANGE SAUCE

1/4 cup honey

Juice and zest from 2 oranges

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 -inch piece of ginger, grated with a Microplane or very finely minced

1 garlic clove, grated with a Microplane or very finely minced

Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Place the chicken in a resealable plastic bag. Add the tapioca starch and the sesame seeds, seal the bag, and shake to coat the chicken.

Drizzle half the oil on the baking sheet then lay the chicken on top. If there are sesame seeds remaining in the bag, take them out and press them into the tops of the chicken. Drizzle with the remaining oil. Place the chicken into your oven and bake for 35 minutes.

While the chicken is baking, make the sauce. Combine all the sauce ingredients in a small pan over medium-high heat. Boil for 5-7 minutes, or until the sauce thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon.

Remove the chicken from the oven and dip each piece in the sauce then set it back on the baking sheet. Turn your oven to broil and put the chicken back in the oven for 5 minutes.

Keep a close eye to make sure thighs do not burn.

Teriyaki Cheesesteak Sandwich

Caramelized savory and sweet beef and onion teriyaki, lightly toasted hoagie buns, and yummy melted white cheddar cheese.

That’s our Teriyaki Cheesesteak Sandwich. Th sandwich is made with thin slices of ribeye steak.

This sandwich will give you a smooth, buttery, and flavorful experience in your mouth and will end with happy bellies.

The Teriyaki Cheesesteak Sandwich

Birth Place and Popularity of The Cheesesteak Sandwich

Philadelphia (USA) is the birth place of the cheesesteak sandwich and is a popular regional fast food to this day.

The cheesesteak, well actually the steak sandwich was a creation of the 1930’s by a hotdog stand owner named Pat Olivieri.

The exact story behind its creation is debated. But the sandwich became so popular, that Pat opened a restaurant called – Pat’s King of Steaks – and is in operation till this day.

Pat’s King of Steak

But wait, if Pat did not use cheese on his original creation, then why is it called a cheesesteak sandwich?

The media syndicate – Thrillest– writes that a manger at Pat’s named Joe Lorenzo, an overly confident manager, dropped a little Provolone to complete the masterpiece.

Later in 1952, Cheez Whiz hit the market. And since then, the Philly Cheesesteak and Cheez Whiz have become very close friends.

Variations of cheesesteaks are now common in many restaurants and fast food establishments.

Such as the mushroom cheesesteak, pepper cheesesteak or a pizza cheesesteak among many others.

Out side of Philadelphia, the original sandwich is referred to as a Pilly cheesesteak.

According to a media syndicate named – Mashed – Pat’s King of Steaks can turn out upwards of 6,000 cheesesteaks per day.

Teriyaki Cheesesteak Sandwich

This recipe makes two servings. To make additional servings, per serving add 1/2 onion, 1/3 pound of meat, 3 cheese slices, 1/8 cup teriyaki, and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper and 1 hoagie roll.

¾ lb ribeye, mostly frozen

1 onion

6 slices aged white cheddar

¼ cup Teriyaki sauce

2 tbsp oil

½ tsp ground black pepper

2 hoagie rolls

Thinly slice onion. Slice ribeye into thin strips (easier to do if meat is half frozen)

Oil a 13×9 inch glass baking dish. Add sliced ribeye, onion, teriyaki sauce, black pepper and mix well.

Then evenly spread the onion meat mixture across the tray in a single layer, with onions on bottom and meat on top.

Position tray about 5 inches away from the broiler and broil on high for about 10 minutes or until the beef is caramelized and the onions are softened. Be sure to check it every couple of minutes to prevent burning.

Remove the glass dish from the oven. Blanket the beef and onions with the 6 cheese slices and place the rolls cut side up in another glass dish.

Place under the broiler on low for about 2-3 minutes or until the cheese has fully melted and the bread is slightly toasted.

Plate cooked cheesesteak between to slices of toasted hoagie bread. Add your favorite side dish and enjoy.

Ham Asparagus Alfredo

The name Asparagus comes from the Greek word meaning “shoot” or “sprout.”

The shoots grow from a crown planted in sandy soil and can grow 10 inches in a 24-hours under the ideal weather conditions.

There are three colors of the plant, white, purple and the most common color, green.

White – Purple – Green Asparagus

White asparagus is more delicate and difficult to harvest, and the purple variety is smaller and fruitier tasting.

Nutritional Value of Asparagus

This vegetable’s profile is one of the most nutritionally and well-balanced of most eatable vegetables.

It is high in folic acid and a good source of potassium , fiber, thiamin, and vitamins A, B6, C,E, and in smaller amounts, iron, zinc and riboflavin.

It’s an excellent source of vitamin K, an essential nutrient involved in blood clotting and bone health (Source: National Library of Medicine).

Asparagus contains high amounts of flavonoids, and these plant chemicals have been found to help lower blood pressure.

Research suggests that increasing potassium intake while reducing salt intake is an effective way to lower high blood pressure.

And that’s good reason for you to prepare a plate of Ham Asparagus Alfredo.

1 lb. jumbo asparagus, ends trimmed

2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 cup heavy cream

3 oz. cream cheese, room temperature

1/3 cup shredded mozzarella

1/2 tsp. Italian seasoning

1/4 tsp. Himalayan salt

Freshly ground black pepper

8 ounce cooked ham, chopped or 4 strips bacon, cooked and crumbled

Grated Parmesan, for serving

Using a julienne peeler, peel asparagus into long, thin strips by holding the asparagus by its tip to keep it steady while peeling.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil. Add minced garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.

Next add heavy cream and cream cheese and cook until cream cheese is completely melted.

Next add mozzarella, Italian seasoning, salt, and pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook until thickened, about 2 minutes.

Place another large skillet over medium heat and heat remaining tablespoon of oil.

Next add asparagus noodles and cook until tender, about 3 to 4 minutes.

Using tongs, plate asparagus (between 3-4 plates) and spoon Alfredo sauce over top.

Serve topped with cooked ham and Parmesan cheese.

Maple Mustard Chicken Thighs

Marinades are a fantastic way to add delicious flavor to any meat.

And these Maple Mustard Chicken Thighs are coated in a sweet and tangy marinade and then baked.

Marinated chicken thighs

They are super juicy with tons of flavor.

Chicken thighs are easier to cook. Even if they reach an internal temperature of 180 degrees, they’ll still be juicy.

Left over thigh meat when warmed is still juicy and tender as well.

With its unique sweet flavor, pure maple syrup can be used in both sweet and savory culinary applications.

It can be used as a replacement for other sweeteners in a variety of desserts and baked goods, such as pies and cakes.

French Dijon and grainy mustard It can even be used as an ingredient in a sweet and spicy sauce or marinade. Such as, a traditional Dijon and a grainy old style mustard.

About Maple Syrup

Scientists have identified over 67 different polyphenols (plant compounds), at which nine of of them are unique to pure maple syrup.

Polyphenols act as antioxidants, which neutralize harmful free radicals that can damage your body’s healthy cells and increase your risk for disease (Source).

Pure maple syrup Pure maple syrup is an excellent source of manganese, riboflavin, calcium, thiamin, potassium, and copper.

With the beneficial vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, maple syrup is a great sugar substitute when baking.

With the beneficial vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, maple syrup is a great sugar substitute in any recipe.

Though maple syrup matches the sweetness of cane sugar, the out come of your recipe can be affected, as the syrup’s consistency is much thinner than cane syrup.

Read more here: How To Use Maple Syrup in Baking

Facts About Mustard

As members of Brassica or Sinapis genera, mustard plants are a close relative to a variety of common vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, and cabbage.

When the Romans conquered the Gauls, they brought mustard seeds with them, and these seeds took root in the fertile soil of France’s Burgundy region.

By the 13th century, a city named Dijon had emerged and became the hub of mustard production, which laid the foundation for the invention of the region’s signature – Dijon mustard.

Mustard seed colors

Mustard Seed Colors

Crushed mustard seeds vary in color from a pale yellow to a dark brown depending on their variety.

The common and traditional color we see in the mustard we buy at the store is due to the addition of turmeric.

What Makes Mustard Spicy

By nature, mustard seeds are spicy.

When the seeds are crushed, an enzyme called myrosinase is released, creating a mustard oil.

The combination of crushed seeds and cold water results in a mustard oil that accounts for the heat or spiciness.

About 15 minutes of mixing the crushed seed with water, the spicy flavor quickly declines.

So an acidic element is added to the prepared mustard to delay or stop this decline.

Now that you know about the sweet and spicy in Maple Mustard Chicken – here is the recipe:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Rinse chicken and pat dry. Combine mustard, garlic, marjoram and maple syrup in a small bowl.

Spread about 1 1/2 tablespoons mustard mixture evenly on top of each chicken thigh, being careful to cover as much of the surface as possible to form a “crust.”

Maple Mustard Chicken

Arrange chicken in a glass baking dish. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until mustard mixture has formed a crust and is slightly hardened, and juices run clear when the chicken is pierced.

Cooking with Chicken Thighs

Chicken is the most popular type of poultry, and it is the second most consumed meat in the world.

Chicken has leaner meat than most other types of poultry, like goose or duck.

Chicken thighs are a favorite cut of dark meat poultry for those who love to cook, due to the thighs flavor and tenderness.

Because dark meat contains more tendons, chicken thighs are a tough cut, but because they contain more fat than white meat, they are more tender and juicy.

The abundance of connective tissue not only makes them flavorful, but also forgiving of longer cooking times unlike breast meat, which tends to dry out quickly.

Is Chicken Thigh Meat Healthy To Eat

Some chicken parts contain fat. The organ meats contain the most fat, followed by the thigh and leg meat, and then the breast meat.

Chicken thighs as we all know is brown meat, and so is the fat.

Brown fat is a type of fat that stores energy in a small space. It creates heat and burns calories.

Most of the fat in chicken thighs are unsaturated, making it a healthier cut of meat over other fatty options.

And your body needs a certain intake of fat every day in order to create energy.

Nutritional Value Of Thigh Meat

Thigh meat contains more vitamins and a full spectrum of minerals. The vitamins include most of the B-vitamins, with vitamin – A and E, and folate as well.

The serving of chicken thigh meat provides you with 30% of the daily value (DV) for niacin, 15% of the DV for phosphorus, vitamin B-6 and zinc and 10% of the DV for riboflavin.

You need niacin, riboflavin and vitamin B-6 for turning the food you eat into energy and phosphorus and zinc for forming DNA.

On average, bone-in chicken thighs are about 6 ounces each, with about 3 to 4 ounces of edible meat.

Chicken thighs are an excellent source of protein. One serving of thigh meat, about 3 to 4 ounces contains around 14 grams of protein.

One medium chicken thigh with skin contains about 140 calories and 9 grams of fat. Where as, a skinless thigh contains 90 calories and 4 grams of fat.

Chicken skin can add delicious flavor and texture, though it can add fat and calories to the otherwise lean meat.

If you prefer your thigh with the bone in, but rather not eat the skin do to your concern about calories and fat, that’s okay.

You can reduce the calories and fat by removing the cooked skin before serving the meat.

A 2014 study by a Canadian research study group found that organic free-range chickens were lower in fat compared to caged chickens.

However, when the skin was removed there was no difference in fat content.

Chicken Skin Contains Large Amounts of Glycine

Collagen is good for the health of our skin. Our body produces collagen through the synthesis of amino acids.

The primary (non-essential) amino acid involved in Collagen synthesis is called glycine.

The most concentrated sources of glycine include meat cuts from near the bone, skin, and connective tissues of chicken meat.

Chicken thighs, including the skin, is one of the very best dietary sources of glycine. Per 100 grams of chicken thigh, there is a supply of approximately 1137 mg of glycine.

How Many Thighs Per Serving

When your cooking dinner, you always hope you make enough.

With chicken thighs, the meat on the bone can vary in weight.

Cooked and Platted Skinless Boneless Chicken Thighs

The average package of four chicken thighs will weigh approximately 1 1/2 pounds .

One chicken thigh will yield about 3 to 4 ounces of meat, without skin or bone. Therefore, count on big eaters having two thighs.

And for lighter meat eaters, including children, usually one chicken thigh per person should be enough.

Chicken thighs are easier to cook. Even if they reach an internal temperature of 180 degrees, they’ll still be juicy.

Left over thigh meat when warmed is still juicy and tender.

According to Taste Asian Food – Asian chef’s prefer chicken thigh over breast meat and they say that chicken thigh meat is the most common cut of chicken used in Asian recipes because the meat is juicier and more tender than chicken breast meat.

So on your next trip to the market, get a package of chicken thighs and give yourself a head start on dinner, as this versatile cut of meat is flavor-packed and delicious.

Read more here about chicken breasts: Enhance Your Chicken Breasts With These Simple Maneuvers