An Instant Vitamin D Boost – with recipes

An Instant Vitamin D Boost - with recipes

Vitamin D is the only nutrient your body produces when exposed to the sun.

UVB rays are absorbed through your skin and go through a process to become an active form of vitamin D.

But during winter months, we are at a higher risk of deficiency.

Other factors that can effect your vitamin D levels include latitude, skin pigmentation, and sunblock.

Deficiency is extremely common worldwide, as up to 50% of the world’s popular is not getting enough sun, and 40% of US residents.

Actions of Vitamin D In Our Body

Vitamin D is commonly called a vitamin though behaves more like a hormone.

This means that vitamin D acts as a messenger and not a participant in metabolism.

It is an acting hormone not only crucial for your bone health, but also your digestive health, muscle function, managing anxiety, and maximizing immune function.

Research has found a correlation between low vitamin D levels and SAD or Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Vitamin D also plays its roll in removing calcium from the blood and sending it to your bones and other organs that rely on it.

A deficiency of vitamin D according to documented medical research, suggests that vitamin D deficiency may also be linked to increased risk of cardiovascular events, the development of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune conditions.

Vitamin D is available as a vitamin supplement and can be purchased in combination with calcium.

Optimal levels of vitamin D are between 40 and 60 ng/mL. To reach these levels, health care providers recommend 5,000 IU/day (a blood test can determine your levels).

Getting Vitamin D With Your Diet

A vitamin supplement and a diet that includes vitamin D is a great idea for reaching ideal levels.

Skin Contact With The Suns Rays Provides Your Body With Vitamin D

The best food source to get your vitamin D is Salmon, Tuna, Trout, and Egg yokes among other foods.

Fish From The Wild For Vitamin D

Salmon

Wild caught salmon has 988 IU of vitamin D per 3.5 ounce serving. Where as some studies have found even higher levels in wild salmon — up to 1,300 IU per serving.

Oven-Baked Pecan Crusted Salmon

You will also enjoy Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive Dressing – Yummy

Tuna

If weekly fresh fish is out of your budget, an economical source of vitamin D is canned tuna.

Three ounces of canned tuna contains approximately 50% of your daily vitamin D requirement.

Make sure the canned tuna you buy is wild caught and not farmed.

Quinoa Tuna Patties

You can also find a Tuna Salad Stuffed Avocado HERE.

Trout

According to Nutrition Advanced, rainbow trout is one of the best dietary sources of vitamin D, and one fillet offers 635 IU, which is more than 100% of the Recommended Daily Allowance.

Roasted Trout with Baby Potatoes and Asparagus

Egg Yokes

With an average serving of two eggs providing 82% of your daily recommended intake of vitamin D, eggs contain some of the highest quantities of vitamin D of any food.

Each egg yolk has about 40 IUs of vitamin D so eating two eggs contributes 80 IUs to your daily intake. Eggs are also an excellent source of protein and lutein.

Try these recipes prepared with whole eggs.

Asparagus & Eggs with Hollandaise Sauce

Try this delicious breakfast recipe that includes using two eggs.

Red Swiss Chard & Asparagus Omelette

Oven-Baked Pecan Crusted Salmon

Oven-Baked Pecan Crusted Salmon

You might think Pecan Crusted Salmon is a fancy restaurant dish that you can’t make at home. But you can and it’s really easy to make.

This easy, pecan crusted salmon recipe is made with just 5 healthy ingredients – includes: Salmon – Pecans – Garlic – Parsley – and Cilantro.

Wild caught fish is the best fish to eat. The following are 3 reasons why farmed fish is bad or dangerous for your health.


You Will Also LikeThai Salmon Noodle Bowl


The Dangers Of Eating Farmed Fish

Danger 1

One of the biggest risks you take when you take a bite of farm-raised fish for dinner is that you’re taking a big bite of dioxin.

The World Health Organization says that dioxins are found throughout the world in the environment and they accumulate in the food chain, mainly in the fatty tissue of animals.

Scientists have found that dioxin levels in farmed fish are 11 times higher than those of wild caught fish.

Once dioxin is consumed it can stay in your body from 7 – 10 years and is linked to immune system problems and organ damage in humans.

Danger 2

A Scientific study reported finding that mice given farm raised salmon to eat had developed metabolic syndrome as well as the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

According to the researchers, the reasons for metabolic syndrome and blood sugar problems is because farmed fish are contaminated with persistent organic pollutants or POPs which have shown to cause insulin resistance and obesity.


How About A Salmon Salad – Honey Mustard Salmon Salad


Danger 3

You know that beautiful pink color salmon have? It is a natural color to wild caught salmon only.

Farmed salmon have a chemical added to their flesh called canthaxanthin – which can cause problems with the pigments in the retina of your eye (Food Additives & Contaminates).

Wild Caught Salmon Considered Superior

If you ask the experts about the advantages of wild-caught salmon over farmed salmon, they will point to the superior flavor and texture of wild-caught salmon, as well as its ideal ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids.

They would note that farmed salmon is actually higher in pro-inflammatory and disease-promoting omega-6 fatty acids.

Oven-Baked Pecan Crusted Salmon

4 individual salmon fillets

1/4 cup pecans, finely chopped

1/4 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Preheat oven to 375°F and lightly brush the bottom of a cast iron skillet with avocado oil.

In a small bowl, combine pecans, parsley, garlic, olive oil, salt & pepper.

Spread the topping evenly over the salmon filets.

Bake salmon for 20 minutes, or until fish is fully cooked and easily flakes with a fork.

Plate and serve.

Suggested side dishes for your Oven-Baked Pecan Crusted Salmon:

Roasted Charred Sweet Potatoes

Roasted Red Potatoes with Garlic Parmesan

Creamy Spinach Parmesan Orzo

Stuffed Sweet Potato with Chipotle Black Bean and Corn Salad


Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Tender flaky wild caught Alaskan salmon, prepared with a honey-miso glaze, that delicately sits over a bed of silky noodles, mango, avocado, radicchio, carrots, mint, basil, and peanuts tossed with a tasty refreshing vinaigrette.

It is a long list of fresh ingredients, but do not let the long list deter you.

If you are able to boil noodles, tear mint, shredded vegetables and open an oven door, you can handle this wonderfully delicious Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl.

What Is Radicchio

Radicchio, also known as Italian chicory, is a type of leafy chicory featuring dark reddish-purple leaves and white veins.

Though commonly mistaken for red cabbage or lettuce, radicchio has a distinctly bitter taste that goes well with many Italian dishes.

It’s a traditional ingredient in the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes whole plant foods.

What Ramen Noodles To Use

Ramen noodles are made with wheat flour that can be cooked and dehydrated after frying.

On the other hand, fresh ramen noodles are made with a combination of eggs, wheat, and alkalized water.

Why alkalized water? Alkaline water helps to give that unique and special springy texture to the noodles.

Fresh Made Ramon Noodles

These noodles also have that slurping texture because it’s made with the combination of gluten flour and higher protein count as well.

These noodles have yellow tones that are available in straight and wavy forms.

Some scientific research, though not conclusive, has suggested that consuming instant ramen noodles two or more times a week can increase the likelihood of developing heart disease, as well as diabetes and stroke, especially in women.

To make a fresh Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl, we suggest using all fresh ingredients, including fresh, not dehydrated, Ramon noodles.

Making homemade fresh Ramon Noodles – Image source: Cilantro and Citronella

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Miso Salmon

4 6-ounce wild-caught sockeye salmon filets

1 tablespoon white (shiro) miso

1 teaspoon sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Vinaigrette

1/4 cup lime juice

1/4 cup peanut oil

1 tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon lite soy sauce

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon toasted sesame soil

1 teaspoon chili paste, optional

1 teaspoon lime zest, grated

1 garlic clove, minced

1 1/2 inch ginger, peeled and grated

The Bowl

8 ounces ramen or lo mein noodles

2 cups arugula

1 cup watercress, stems removed

1 cup radicchio, finely shredded

2 medium carrots, peeled and grated

2 fresno chilies, thinly sliced

1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro

1/2 cup loosely packed mint leaves, torn

1/2 cup loosely packed basil, torn

1/4 cup roasted and salted peanuts

1 large mango, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 hass avocado, cut into 1-inch cubes

Scallions, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Place salmon on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

In a bowl, mix to combine miso, vinegar, and honey. Brush mixture onto salmon evenly and top each filet with sesame seeds.

Roast salmon for 10 to 12 minutes (10 minutes for medium-rare / 12 minutes for medium) until it easily flakes with a fork.

While the salmon is cooking, boil the ramen noodles according to the package instructions. When complete, rinse briefly with cool water to stop the cooking process.

To make the vinaigrette, whisk lime juice, peanut oil, fish sauce, soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, chili paste, lime zest, garlic, and ginger in a bowl.

In a large bowl, toss to combine noodles, arugula, watercress, radicchio, carrots, chilies, cilantro, mint, basil, peanuts, and vinaigrette. Add mango and avocado and gently toss.

Fresh Ramon Noodles

Divide noodles into serving bowls, top with salmon, and garnish with scallions.

Serve with a squeeze of lime if desired.

Honey Mustard Salmon Salad

Honey Mustard Salmon Salad on a green platter with gluten free crackers Rich salmon with slightly sweet garlic mustard, and local raw honey. There’s crunchy vegetables included that makes this fresh salad a more flavorful one than tuna salad.

Children, teens, and adults alike will enjoy it on some crackers, or as a sandwich.

We enjoyed our “Honey Mustard Salmon Salad” with some crackers made from red, yellow, and green lentil flour.

Wild caught salmon is in season from April through November, during which time you can find it fresh at your local markets and it is the least expensive.

Wild salmon not only provides exceptional flavor and nutrition found in few other foods, but is easy to prepare and enjoyed even by those who are not always fond of fish (WHF).

Skinning and Boning A Salmon Fillet

Though we used canned salmon from The Whole Foods Market, you can use fresh cooked salmon as well.

If you happen to buy some with the skin still on and you wish to remove it and not really sure how to do it, just follow these instructions from The World’s Healthiest Foods – Salmon Bones and Skin Removed.

salmon-skinned-deboned

GIF credit: Worlds Healthiest Foods

Start with a sharp knife and hold one edge of the filet with your fingers and slide the knife between the skin and meat at about a 45° angle facing the edge of the blade toward the skin.

Position the blade so that the fish is in the middle. Do not move your knife back and forth, but rather move the salmon back and forth on your knife blade holding the skin.

Keep the edge of  the knifes blade at an angle so it cuts between the meat and skin without cutting through the skin.

To remove the bones, run your fingers over the top of the fish too find a line of bones. Remove them one at a time with a pair of tweezers, pliers, or your fingers. Pull them out going with the grain of the fish so they slide out without tearing the meat.

It takes some practice, but with a sharp knife it can actually be quite easy.

Bears Enjoy Salmon To

We would say that this recipe has been kitchen tested, and is budget friendly.

Here is what you will need to prepare your own Honey Mustard Salmon Salad.

4 tablespoons sweet garlic mustard (found at Whole foods Market)

4 tablespoons plain yogurt (we used a homemade yogurt)

2 tablespoons local raw honey

2 – 6 ounce cans Alaskan Wild Salmon, drained

1 small red bell pepper, diced

2 celery stalks, sliced thin

1/2 cup white onion, diced

ingredients for Honey Mustard Salmon SaladIn a large bowl, mix together mustard, yogurt, and honey. Add salmon, red bell pepper, celery, and onion.

mixing in honey - Honey Mustard Salmon SaladStir together until mixed.

Honey Mustard Salmon Salad - close upPlace the Honey Mustard Salmon Salad in the center of a serving platter and surround the fish mixture with your favorite crackers, and serve.

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Cast Iron Seared and Broiled Salmon With Fruit And Herb Salsa

Cast Iron Seared and Baked Salmon with Fruit and Herb Salsa

The website Yummly boasts over 493 different pan seared salmon recipes, and we have one for you that you are sure to enjoy.

We pan seared and broiled salmon steaks in a cast iron skillet. The exciting thing about that for us was, the cast iron skillet we used is black enamel coated, so there is no seasoning or special care needed, as there is with a traditional cast iron pot or skillet.

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Read More: How to Care for Your Cast Iron Cookware

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The Science of Cooking explains the purpose of searing meat, noting the process is called  the “Maillard Reaction,” and is not to be confused with “Caramelization.”

When searing meat, hundreds of different flavor compounds are created. When heated, these compounds break down to form new flavor. Each type of meat being seared has a very distinctive set of flavor compounds that are formed during the Maillard reaction.

The important thing about the Maillard reaction isn’t the color—, it’s the flavors and aromas.

The Modernist Cuisine explains that temperatures need to be high to bring about the Maillard reaction, but as long as the food is very wet, its temperature won’t climb above the boiling point of water.

Now for our featured recipe: – Cast Iron Seared and Broiled Salmon With Fruit And Herb Salsa – and here is what you will need.

First prepare the Fruit and Her Salsa, and refrigerate for later.

1 cup diced peaches, fresh or frozen

3/4 cup diced mango, fresh or frozen

2 mini red sweet peppers, seeded and diced

1/4 cup diced red onion

5 leaves of fresh mint, leaves chopped

1 spring thyme, leaves only, discard steams

1/4 cup Italian parsley

Juice of 1/2 lime

1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt

cast iron cooking with avocado oilPrepare and mix together all ingredients in a medium bowl. Top and refrigerate until ready to use.

Now prepare your salmon steaks. You will need the following for two servings.

2 salmon steaks, skin on

3 to 4 tablespoons avocado oil, smoke point to 500 degrees

3-4  cups Arugula

Salmon steaks in a cast iron skilletHeat oven on broil. Next, lightly drizzle avocado oil (heat safe to 500 degrees) into a cast iron oven-safe skillet over medium-high heat.  Add salmon steaks to heated skillet and sear on each side for 2 minutes.

turning salmon steaksPlace skillet in pre-heated oven under the broiler for 7 to 10 minutes, turning steaks about every 3 minutes.

Be careful not to overcook. As the skillet is close to the broiler element, keep a close eye on your salmon steaks so they do not burn. We baked our salmon steaks to about 155 degrees, as you need to remember the fish continues to cook even after you remove it from the oven.

Cast Iron Seared and Baked Salmon with Fruit and Herb Salsa - close upIt is important to remove the salmon from the skillet soon after removing it from the oven. Have plates ready with arugula, and top each with a salmon steak. Next spoon some fruit and herb salsa over the salmon, and enjoy!

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Coconut Salmon

Coconut Salmon

Salmon always tastes great whether it is simply baked, steamed, or smoked. It goes perfectly well with a lot of dishes and always seems to add a refined vibe to the dinner table. It’s also low in calories and a great option if you’re trying to lose weight. For a new take on salmon and a more exotic way of preparing it, try this coconut salmon recipe over steamed rice and your palate will surely be delighted.

Coconut AminosIf you are trying to burn belly fat, you will want to consider the fact that salmon contains a very high amount of protein which is good at helping the body’s metabolism to work and break down fat and turn it into energy.

The dietary action of omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon are similar to that of protein, which forces the body to naturally burn more calories while helping to keep your appetite in check throughout the day (Active Beat).

Our featured recipe is: Coconut Salmon. The coconut in the recipe is not the meat, but rather using coconut tree sap and blended with mineral rich sea salt.

Here is what you will need.

Coconut Salmon ingredients

The following ingredients are for one serving. Just double, or triple it for additional servings.

1 piece of salmon fillet, about 1/2 pound, boned, skin on

2 slices two of ginger root

3 tablespoons dark coconut amino sauce

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1/2 teaspoon of red chili flakes

Pinch of freshly ground black pepper corns

1 or 2 tablespoons coconut oil

1/2 teaspoon of sesame seeds for garnish

1/2 chopped green onion for garnish

marinating coconut  SalmonMarinate the salmon in the ginger, sesame oil, coconut amino sauce, red chili flakes and black pepper for 30 minutes to 3 hours prior to cooking.

Heat a large ceramic coated frying pan over medium heat with coconut oil and add the salmon skin side down (reserve the marinade). This prevents the fish from sticking to the pan as well as prevents the meat from shrinking up.

After 3 minutes turn the fish and add the marinade, and cook another 2 to 3 minutes.

Coconut SalmonServe over a bowl of steamed rice and garnish with sesame seeds and diced green onions or another green like cilantro or parsley.

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Roasted Trout with Baby Potatoes and Asparagus

Roasted Trout with Baby Potatoes and AsparagusTrout is one of the healthiest fish you can include in your diet, says Monterrey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch. Some would conclude that farmed raise fish is better for you as it is raised in fresh water protected from environmental hazards (EH). The protection from EH is great, but is farmed fish over wild fish better for you? Is farmed fish equal to wild caught fish?

Trout born in the wild eat just about anything, like young zoo plankton, fish eggs, small fish, crustaceans, mollusks, insects and even mice. In dense habitats with aquatic vegetation, rainbow trout often have the opportunity to eat arthropods that fall into the stream (National Wildlife Federation).

Farmed trout is fed a formulated fish feed, and each feed company has their own recipe. Feeds are made with fish meal, and fish oil combined with other ingredients like wheat, soybean meal, and poultry by-product meal. Notice the difference in the diet? Are fish meant to eat chicken, soy or wheat? A wild trouts diet shows otherwise.

Fish species evaluated by the USDA, found that farm-raised fish contained more total fat than their wild counterparts. Rainbow trout showed little difference in fat. Some could conclude that has to be good, the more fat the more omega-3 fatty acids the fish contains. Not necessarily. The extra fat in farmed-fish is inflammation causing omega-6 (Nutritional Health and Fitness).

Enough of the fishy information, now for our featured recipe: Roasted Trout with Baby Potatoes and Asparagus.

You will need:

1 pound baby new potatoes

1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut in half crosswise

2 tablespoons olive oil

Himalayan salt and freshly ground pepper corns

2 whole rainbow trout, gutted

Half a lemon, thinly sliced

1 bunch thyme (lemon thyme if you have it)

Heat oven to 425 degrees

boiling baby potatoesPlace potatoes in a large saucepan and fill with water to cover potatoes within 1-inch. Bring to a boil and cook until barely tender, about 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.asparagus and cooked baby potatoes mixed with olive oil salt and pepperIn a large bowl add salt, pepper, olive oil, trimmed asparagus and cooked potatoes. Mix vegetables to coat with oil.

ready to roast baby potatoes and asparagusArrange vegetables in a 9 X 13 inch glass baking pan, and set aside.

rubbed fresh crushed pepper cornsRub the fish inside and out with the crushed pepper corns. Next stuff the fish with a fresh sprig or two of thyme and a lemon slice cut in two.

ready to roast - Roasted Trout with Baby Potatoes and AsparagusArrange fish over vegetables in glass baking pan, and add 3 or 4 lemon slices. Place into heated oven and cooked 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crisp and tender and the fish is cooked through.

Fresh roasted trout showing the amazing flavors of freh thyme, cruched pepper corns and lemon slicesRemove fish and let cool about 5 minutes.

Roasted Trout with Baby Potatoes and AsparagusPlate and serve.

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Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa with Prosciutto Wrapped Vegetables

Do you know the difference between farmed fish and wild ocean caught fish, in particularly salmon? We wanted to know the answer, so we reasearch it, and here is what we found.

Farmed fish is a $1 billion a year revenue (USA), with salmon being number one.

Farmed salmon has less area in which to grow and thrive, and their bodies are much fattier than wild salmon, and have less omega-3 fatty acids.

They are fed processed fish oil and fish meal or a high fat feed, which is not the typical food wild salmon eat.

The flesh of farmed salmon are greyish in color due to their diet. Food coloring is added after harvesting to give farmed salmon the pinkish color that wild caught salmon have naturally.

Health Problems Associated with Farmed Salmon

 fish farm cage in Norwegian SeaFish farm cage in Norwegian Sea

Farmed salmon contain more unhealthy omega-6 fatty acids, and higher lipid levels (Lipid Composition in Farmed and Wild Salmon), raising the risk of inflammation, which is  associated with heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and other health problems.

Farmed salmon are given antibiotics and in some cases growth hormones, which also gets into the water supply, and can affect other wild marian creatures.

As of 2013 AquaBounty Technologies (US based company) has received approval from the FDA (Genetically Engineered Salmon) to genetically modify farmed salmon.

The one benefit of farmed salmon is they have no mercury in their meat, as they are grown in so-called controlled waters and their lifespan is shorter than in the wild, and wild salmon live longer with higher chances of mercury exposure.

After considering the research, it appears to us here at Splendid Recipes and More, that wild caught salmon is clearly more natural and nutritious over  its farm grown counterpart.

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Now for our featured recipe and here is what you will need.

The recipe makes four (4) servings, so you will need four salmon filets that are de-boned. When shopping for the ingredients to make the salsa, be sure to purchase one each of red sweet pepper (bell pepper), mango, serrano chili, small lime, and one bunch of green onions (Scallions). You will also need 2 medium peaches (frozen are ok if fresh peaches are not in season).

2 medium peaches, peeled, deseeded, chopped

1 large mango, peeled, deseeded, chopped

½ cup green onions, diced (about 3 scallions)

½ red bell pepper, diced

1 Serrano pepper, deseeded and minced

½ tsp. salt

1 tbsp. sugar (we used coconut sugar)

Juice from one half of a lime

Optional: ½ cup cilantro, chopped

chopped and diced produce for Peach and Mango Salsa

Prepare peaches and mango. Place into a medium mixing bowl along with the diced onion and red bell pepper. Do not mix. Next add Serrano pepper and optional to add chopped cilantro, again, do not mix.

Peach and Mango Salsa - close-up

squeeze out lime juice with the back of a spoon Squeeze out lime juice with the back of a spoon

 Together add salt, coconut sugar and lime juice. Stir mixture until well incorporated.

Let mixture set for 15 minutes at room temperature for flavors to infuse, or refrigerate until ready to eat.

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Prepare salmon, by grilling, baking, or broiling. Plate your salmon and top with the salsa. The recipe for the side dish of vegetables to be posted.

Peach and Mango Salsa

The salsa can keep in a jar with a tight lid for 2-3 days in the refrigerator, or can be frozen for later use.

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The Eatable Fiddlehead Fern

The Eatable Fiddlehead Fern

Fiddlehead greens are the curled stalk or leaflet of Fiddlehead fern, and these curled leaflets are harvested for use as a vegetable or leafy green. Fiddleheads are harvested early in the season (Spring) before the frond has opened and reached its full height, they are cut as close as possible at ground level.

Believe it or not, but fiddlehead ferns have antioxidants, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and are high in iron and fiber (Agriculture Canada Study). The most popular verities that are harvested for food are:

  • Western Sword Fern
  • Lady Fern
  • Cinnamon Fern or Buckhorn Fern
  • Royal Fern
  •  Midin
  • Zenmai or Flowering Fern
  • Vegetable Fern

Certain varieties though, of the fiddlehead fern can be carcinogenic.

Harvesting the Fiddlehead Fern

Health Benefits of the Fiddlehead Fern

We mentioned a few nutritional benefits of the fern at the onset of the article, other benefits of the fern are, it’s rich in potassium, and low in sodium.

A draw back of eating the fiddlehead is it contains an enzyme called thiaminase, which breaks down thiamine a B-vitamin. Therefore, it is best not to consume the fern in excess, as it can lead to beriberi and other vitamin-B deficiencies.

Dinning On Fiddlehead Greens

Fiddlehead ferns grow wild in wet areas of the northeastern part of North America in the spring. Fiddleheads are a traditional dish of  Maine, and northern New England (USA) , and in some parts of northern Canada. It is said that the town of Tide Head, New Brunswick (Canada) claims itself as the “Fiddlehead Capital of the World.”

It is recommended to cooked the fiddlehead greens thoroughly before eating eating them as they do contain some traces of tannins and toxins. The recommended cooking time is 15 minutes if boiled and 10 to 12 minutes if steamed. The cooking methods of gourmet cooks, is to spread the greens into a thin layer in a steaming basket and steam them lightly, just until tender crisp.

The University of Maine states that the ostrich fiddleheads should not be Sauteed , stir-fried, or microwaved.  They say that the Fiddleheads should be boiled or steamed prior to use in recipes, and after doing so, then they can be used for sauteing, stir-frying or baking.

Recipes Using Fiddlehead Greens

Hawaiian Fern SaladHawaiian Fern Salad

1 pound warabi (fiddleheads)

1 cup water

1 tablespoon Hawaiian salt

1 (4oz.) package codfish, shredded

1 small onion, thinly sliced

2 tomatoes, cubed (can also use cherry tomatoes)

Sauce ingredients:

¼ cup soy sauce

⅓ cup lemon juice

½ cup sugar

¼ teaspoon garlic salt

Thoroughly rinse warabi and dry, then cut into 1-inch length. In a saucepan, bring 1 cup water to a boil, then add salt and warabi. Turn down heat to medium and cook until tender. Drain and set aside.

Heat shredded codfish on medium heat for approximately 2 minutes. Cool.

In a mixing bowl, combine warabi, codfish, onions and tomatoes.

Sauce instructions:

Mix together soy sauce, lemon juice, sugar and garlic salt. Pour over warabi salad and toss gently.

Chill until ready to serve.

Spicy Vegetable fern saladSpicy Vegetable Fern Salad

1 pound cooked shrimp and oysters

16 ounce bag of spring mix of leafy greens

4 boiled eggs, sliced

1 red onion, sliced

2 medium tomatoes sliced

1 red bell pepper, sliced

¼ cup soy sauce

⅓ cup lemon juice

½ cup sugar

¼ teaspoon garlic salt

2 to 3 tablespoons of wasabi  sauce

In a medium bowl mix soy sauce, lemon juice, sugar, and garlic salt. Pour dressing into a large salad bowl. Next add first 6 ingredients in the recipe list. Toss until well coated with the dressing. Plate and serve.

 

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Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive Dressing

Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive Dressing

Over the last three decades or so, Americans have learned to reduce fat in their diet. Some are still struggling, but many have made good head way to eating a whole food clean diet, for better health.

Even though fat has been reduced, we are still not eating enough of the healthy fats, which include omega-3 fatty acids, including DHA and EPA or both known as “docosahexaenoic acid” and “eicosapentaenoic acid.” Both are found in fatty fish, like tuna or salmon.

The recommendation of consuming omega-3 fatty acids, is 250 milligrams of DHA and EPA, at least 2 times per week, and 3 ounces at each setting.

Our featured recipe fits the bill, so to speak. The recipe is, Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive Dressing, and here is what you will need.

Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive Dressing

1 pound tiny new potatoes, halved if large

1 pound French green beans, stem ends trimmed

1/2 cup mixed Mediterranean olives, pitted

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon horseradish mustard

Preparing to bake Salmon - Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive Dressing1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon coconut sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 teaspoons lemon pepper

12 ounce fresh baked salmon, broken into chunks

Lemon wedges

Turn broiler up, sprinkle lemon pepper onto flesh side of salmon.

Place on a foil lined baking sheet. Place fish under broiler and broil for about 8 to 10 minutes or until fish is done, about 160 degrees. Let cool, chunk and set aside.

Place potatoes in a 4-quart pan and add water to cover. Bring to boiling, and reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes. Next add beans and return to boiling.

Reduce heat, cover and simmer another 5 minutes or until potatoes and beans are just tender. Drain well, and set aside.

pitted mixed Mediterranean olives - Mediterranean Salmon Salad with Olive DressingMeanwhile, place 1/2 cup olives, oil, mustard, lemon juice, sugar, and pepper in a blender. Cover and blend until smooth.

To serve, plate potato and beans mixture and top with salmon chunks. Drizzle with olive dressing. Garnish with a lemon wedge, if desired.

If the dressing is to thick after blending the ingredients together, you can thin it a bit by adding a little more oil, or a little of the brine from the jar of mixed olives.

 

 

 

 

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