Tortellini Primavera with Cajun Shrimp

Tortellini are ring-shaped pasta, sometimes also described as “navel shaped”, hence their alternative name – “belly button” (ombelico).

Originally from the Italian region of Emilia (in particular Bologna and Modena), they are usually stuffed with a mix of meat, which is pork loin, raw prosciutto, and Mortadella.

It also contains Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, egg and nutmeg.

The Origins of Tortellini

Legend claims that Venus and Zeus were weary after a day of worrying that they stared at a near by inn.

It is said that night the innkeeper went up to their room and peeked through the key hole to see the navel of Venus.

The site of seeing this leaves him spellbound – so much so that he immediately rushes to the kitchen and creates a pasta inspired by Venus’ navel…and so was born the Tortellini.

IS ALL OF THAT TRUE – you ask?

I don’t really know – But that’s what Barrilla (the pasta makers) write on their website – titled What Is The Origin Of Tortellini.

The Italian Tradition of Tortellini

In the land of pasta tortellini’s birth, the region near the Italian city of Bologna, they’re strictly served as broth-like dumplings.

Tortellini in Broth
Tortellini in Broth – Image Source: La Cucina Italiana

There in Bologna a tortellini has never been served as a Pasta Primavera and no less served with Cajun shrimp.

Cajun shrimp over pasta

Gianni degli Angeli is the president of the San Nicola Association, which has taken on the task of safeguarding the local region’s renowned culinary traditions.

He says the No. 1 symbol of the local gastronomic culture is the tortellino.

“In times of poverty and hardship, we ate tortellini only at Christmas, Easter and at weddings, because the filling is made of costly ingredients like prosciutto and parmesan cheese,” he says.

Tortellini are an integral part of family life in the Emilia region, says Massimo Bottura, chef and owner of a three-Michelin-star restaurant in Modena.

He says, “I grew up under the kitchen table escaping my older brothers at my grandmother’s, where flour fell on my feet”(source: NPR).

Cajun Shrimp

These spicy smoked cajun shrimp bring a lot of pizazz to the pasta dish.

Use as much or as little smoked Cajun pepper as you’d like, depending on your taste and those you cook for.

Jar  on plate with smoked Cajun  spice
Smoked Cajun Pepper Spice

The smoked Cajun pepper spice is a mix of:

• Smoked Paprika

• Black Pepper

• Chilli Flakes

• Dried Thyme

• Dried Oregano

• Garlic Powder

• Onion Powder

If the spice you are using for the shrimp is a Creole Cajun Seasoning, it would have all of the seasonings noted above, with the addition of dried parsley and basil.

Tortellini Primavera with Cajun Shrimp

1 package (20 ounces) refrigerated cheese tortellini

3/4 cup sweet peas, fresh or frozen

2 medium sized carrots cut into 1/4 inch circles

3 cups broccoli florets, stems removed

12-15 large shrimp, shell, head and guts remove

2 tbsp unsalted butter

1 tsp. smoked Cajun pepper spice

Sauce

1/2 cup unsalted butter

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 cup of heavy cream

1 cup of finely grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Cook the tortellini according to package directions. Drain and set aside.

While pasta is cooking in potted water, add 2 tablespoons of butter to a large skillet over medium heat, and let melt.

Next place shrimp over butter and sauté for about a minute then sprinkle Cajun spice over shrimp and continue to cook shrimp on both sides until pink.

Shrimp in  a frying pan

Remove skillet from heat and spoon shrimp onto a plate and set aside.

Next, wipe skillet clean and return to heat.

Add the 1/2 cup butter to warmed skillet and melt. Once butter is melted add the garlic, stir and cook until garlic is fragrant about 1 minute.

Next add heavy cream, cheese, and nutmeg and mix well.

Next add vegetables and stir in. Allow to warm about 2 or 3 minutes.

Next add pasta and mix in well.

Two options: mix shrimp with pasta and vegetables or plate pasta and top with shrimp.

Coconut Basil Chicken Curry with Vegetables

Coconut Chicken Curry with Vegetables

There is a variety of dishes or plated food that is prepared with curry originating in the Indian subcontinent.

Though curry dishes make up a significant part of India’s food culture, there is vastly more to Indian cuisine than curry.

Curry powder though is not used in India, as authentic curry dishes from India use the leaves of the curry tree, which is related to the citrus family.

Curry leaves of the curry tree

The powder is a blend of different spices which may or may not include curry leaves.

The spices usually include ground turmeric, cumin, coriander, ginger, and fresh or dried chilies among others.

Bowl of curry powder on a wood deck

Who Invented The Curry Powder

If curry powder is not a spice mix in authentic Indian cuisine, who then coined the term curry powder?

The term curry powder was coined by the British according to the author of the book, “The Oxford Companion to Food.”

The Oxford Companion to Food

The author Alan Davidson writes, “the kind sold commercially represents an attempt by the British manufactures to provide in ready-made form a spice mixture corresponding to those uses in South India.”

You will not find a dish in India prepared with the spice mix called curry powder, but rather only with curry leaves.

In other parts of the world, when you here the word curry, it invokes an image of warm, spicy, delicious food. Such as our Coconut Basil Chicken Curry.

This dish is incredibly fragrant with coconut milk as its base.

After the curry is finished, you add fresh lemon juice, lemon zest, chopped cilantro and basil then stir in, and wait for the herbs aromatic fresh smells to get your taste buds going.

Lemon zest basil and cilantro over a pot of curry

Coconut Basil Chicken Curry with Vegetables

1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs or breasts, thinly sliced

1 1/2 tablespoons yellow curry powder

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1/4-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper using more or less to your taste

kosher salt and black pepper

3 tablespoons sesame oil or extra virgin olive oil

2 zucchini or summer squash, diced

2 ears sweet corn, kernels removed from the cob

2-3 medium shallots, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced or grated

1 inch fresh ginger, grated

1 pinch crushed red pepper flakes

1 can (14 ounce) coconut milk

juice and zest from 1/2 a lemon

1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped

1/4 cup fresh basil, roughly torn

2 cups cooked basmati rice

toasted sesame seeds for serving (optional)

In a medium bowl, toss together the chicken, curry powder, turmeric, cayenne, 1 tablespoon oil, and a pinch each of salt and pepper.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil shimmers, add the chicken and brown all over, about 5 minutes.

Skillet of curry chicken

Next add the zucchini, corn, shallots, garlic, and ginger. Season with crushed red pepper flakes, salt, and pepper. Cook the veggies another 5-10 minutes or until they just begin to soften.

Stir in the coconut milk and 1/3-1/2 cup water. Stir to combine, bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat, cook 5-10 minutes or until the sauce thickens slightly. If the sauce thickens too much, add additional water to thin.

Remove from the heat and stir in the zest, lemon juice, cilantro, and basil.

Serve along side or top over rice.

Coconut Basil Chicken Curry with Vegetables

Pecan Praline Bar Cookies

According to Wikipedia’s research, praline is is a form of confection containing at a minimum culinary nuts, usually almonds and hazelnuts, and sugar. Cream is also a common third ingredient.

Homemade Praline with Chopped Pecans

There are three types:

  • Belgian
  • French
  • American
Belgian Praline Sweets

Praline is prepared and used as a filling in chocolates and other sweets.

A praline cookie is usually a cookie base topped with praline and nuts.

Pecan Praline Cookiephoto source: the view from great island

Preparing and Baking Pecan Praline Cookie Bars

The same as a cookie but only in a bar. The cookie or bars have a shortbread base.

1 1/4 cups unsalted butter

 2 cups flour

 1 1/2 cups light brown sugar

1/2 tsp salt

 1/3 cup honey

2 Tbsp heavy whipping cream

 2 cups pecan pieces

Baking Instructions

Heat oven to 350°F.

To prepare crust place flour, 3/4 cup butter, and 1/2 cup brown sugar in food processor and pulse until mixture forms small lumps.

Place in a 9 x 13-inch baking pan and pat crust mixture evenly across bottom of baking dish.

Bake 20 minutes or until light golden. Remove from oven.

While crust bakes, melt remaining butter in a heavy 2-quart saucepan over medium heat.

Stir in honey and cream, then dissolve remaining brown sugar. Bring to a boil.

Cook 1 minute, remove from heat and stir in pecans.

Pour topping evenly over hot crust.

Return to oven and bake 20 minutes longer or until topping is browned and bubbling.

Let cool for about 15-20 minutes – than cut into squares and serve.

Optional to serve with vanilla ice cream.

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Mozzarella sticks ate a go to appetizer. Their a finger-food that everyone at the table scrambles to snatch up while the cheese is still hot and extra pull-able or gooey.

Their also a big hit as a happy hour snack.

They’re served on party platters, for lunch and at brunch.

Party platter with mozzarella  cheese sticks

Mozzarella sticks are no cheesy joke, just gooey and delicious.

Deep-fried cheese has been said to originate in Paris, France in the 15th century.

However, recipes for breaded cheese sticks can be traced back to 1393. The original recipe called for the use of Muenster cheese instead of Mozzarella.

According to Vision Launch (who writes about the history of cheese) traditional Mozzarella was made using milk from the Water Buffalo.

What Is Panko

With a unique name, panko is simply a type of breadcrumb.

Panko is a Japanese culinary invention. The word panko in Japanese is “pan” meaning bread and “ko” meaning flour.

Herb Panko breadcrumbs

Authentic panko is baked using a pan connected to an electrical current. The finished product has no crust.

The reason the bread is baked this way is not well documented.

But Upper Crust Enterprises, a company that makes authentic panko in LosAngeles (USA), claims this method started during WWII, when Japanese soldiers fighting the Russians needed to bake bread.

With no oven for baking, they reportedly used electric current to cook bread, creating a product still made today.

If you’re looking for a crisp, crunchy texture when you bake or fry something breaded or with bread crumbs, panko is the way to go.

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Mozzarella cheese sticks are a irresistible combination of gooey melted cheese and crisp, golden breading.

  • 1 pound fresh mozzarella, patted dry and cut into sticks or individually wrapped cheese sticks
  • 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup herb Panko breadcrumbs
  • Avocado oil or other neutral-flavored oil, for frying
  • Marinara, warmed, for serving or optional to serve with Tzatziki Sauce

Cut mozzarella lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick slices, then cut again into 4-by-1/2-inch sticks.

Place flour in a shallow dish and season with salt and pepper.

Whisk eggs in a separate dish and season with salt and pepper.

Place mozzarella sticks in flour and coat, tapping off excess flour.

Next dip into eggs batter allowing excess to drip off, and coat with breadcrumbs, patting to adhere.

Transfer mozzarella sticks to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Freeze until firm, at least 1 hour. (Mozzarella sticks can be covered and frozen at this point up to 2 months.)

Breaded mozzarella cheese sticks  on parchment paper

Pour enough oil into a heavy pot (preferably cast iron) to come 2 inches up sides. Heat over medium-high until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350 degrees.

Working in batches, add mozzarella sticks; cook, turning occasionally, until golden and crisp, 2 to 3 minutes (adjust heat as necessary to maintain oil temperature.)

Transfer to a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet to drain.

Plate and serve with marinara sauce or optional to serve with tzatziki sauce.

Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

Risotto is a dish that is creamy, scrumptious and filling.

The beauty of preparing risotto is that you can add just about anything you’d like.

You can use various types of vegetables, herbs, and meat. You can make with or without meat.

Risotto is a comfort food, as it is filling, and is a wonderful dish for leftovers.

Risotto can be a side dish (without meat) but it is also often consumed as a complete meal (when prepared with meat).


Pumpkin Pecan Risotto with Dried Cranberries and Goat Cheese


Unlike other rice that is left in a pot of water to boil, risotto rice requires constant attention to ensure a perfectly finished dish.

The rice is not to be pre-rinsed, boiled, or drained, as washing would remove much of the starch required for a creamy texture.

When Arborio rice is cooked slowly with stock (usually chicken or vegetable stock) it allows the amylopectin starch to be released.

As a result, the rice takes on a smooth, creamy texture.

A 1/3 cup of uncooked Arborio rice (used in preparing risotto) has about 166 calories.

Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

4 pieces bacon

1/2 yellow onion, diced

2 cups arborio rice

4 cups chicken stock, hot

1 cup frozen peas and carrots

1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Zest of 1 lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

Cut bacon into small bite-sized pieces. Add to a large, deep, skillet and cook until crispy. Remove from pan to cool.

Drain most of the bacon grease, leaving about 1 Tbsp. in the pan. Add diced onions and cook on low heat until translucent.

Turn heat to medium and add uncooked rice to the pan. Stir to coat in bacon grease.

Add 1 cup hot chicken stock, reduce heat to low and stir while rice absorbs the liquid. Once it’s absorbed, add another 1 cup and repeat until all the liquid is gone and rice is tender.

This process should take about 20 minutes.

Next, add to tender rice frozen peas and carrots, lemon zest, cilantro and bacon. Mix in well.

Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve warm.

Blood Orange Upside Down Cake

The blood orange is a member of the citrus family, it is both beautiful in color and delicious in flavor.

They are in season from December through May, though the exact months vary depending on what type of blood Orange you’re baking or cooking with.

The most common variety available in markets is the the Moro variety.

Moro Blood Orange

The Moro blood orange is the most colorful of the blood oranges, with a deep red flesh and a rind with a bright red blush.

The deep red flesh means the orange ranges in color from orange veined ruby coloration, to vermilion, to vivid crimson, to nearly black.

Different Hues of the Blood Orange

The flavor is stronger and the aroma is more intense than a normal orange. The fruit has a distinct, sweet flavor with a hint of raspberry.

Are Blood Oranges Naturally Red

Author Harold McGee explains in his book “On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen” – that a blood orange owes the deep maroon color of their juice to anthocyanin pigments, which develop only when night temperatures are low, in the Mediterranean autumn and winter.”

On Food and Cooking

What are anthocyanin pigments? The pigment is found naturally in a number of eatable plants.

These pigments are what produces the red, purple, and blue coloring of eatable plants, such as the blueberry, cherry, and strawberry among others.

The anthocyanin pigments will only develop when temperatures are low at night, as during the Mediterranean fall and winter.

In addition to acting an antioxidant, anthocyanins help fight free radicals, and are found to offer anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer benefits.

Nutritional Value of The Blood Orange

A fresh blood orange is a rich source of vitamins C (20% or greater of the Daily Value), a moderate source of folate (15% of the Daily Value) and dietary fiber.

The orange also has potassium, which is needed for healthy blood pressure and the absorption of zinc.

Interesting Facts About The Blood Orange

Within Europe, the arancia rossa di Sicilia, or the red orange of Sicily, has Protected Geographical Status.

According to The National Gardening Association, the flavor of blood oranges is essentially a cross between an orange and a raspberry.

garden.org

Blood Orange Upside Down Cake

This recipe is baked in a 9-inch spring form pan. But we used four, 5-inch spring form pans. Using this size is up to you, but using them makes individual small sized cakes.

Cakes this size are great for serving at gathers, tea parties, and brunch.

5-inch sized Blood Orange Upside Down Cake

• 2 sticks plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

• 2/3 cup light brown sugar

• 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

• 4 medium-sized blood oranges

• 1 cup fine cornmeal, may sub almond flour

• 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

• 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

• 1/2 teaspoon salt

• 1 cup granulated sugar

• 4 large eggs, at room temperature

• ⅓ cup sour cream

• 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place a 9 inch round piece parchment paper into a 9-inch round spring form pan.

Note: If using the 5-inch spring forms – do the same and place a piece of parchment paper in the bottom of pans.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt 3 tablespoons butter. Add the brown sugar and lemon juice. Stir until sugar melts, about 3 minutes. Scrape mixture into bottom of prepared pan (pans).

Grate 1/2 teaspoon zest from one of the oranges, then slice off the tops and bottoms of oranges.

Place oranges on a clean, flat surface, and slice away the rind and pith, top to bottom, following the curve of the fruit.

Slice each orange crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick wheels and discard any seeds.

Arrange orange wheels on top of brown sugar mixture in a single, tight layer.

In a large bowl, whisk together orange zest, cornmeal, flour, baking powder and salt.

In a separate bowl, cream together remaining 2 sticks butter with granulated sugar. Beat in eggs, one a time, then beat in sour cream and vanilla. Fold in the dry mixture by hand.

Scrape batter into pan (pans) over oranges. Transfer to oven and bake until cake is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center emerges clean, 40 to 50 minutes.

Cool cake in pan 10 minutes, then run a knife along pan’s edges to loosen it. Unlock side of pan and remove.

Next, invert cake onto a platter and cool completely before serving.

Microgreens Another Source Of Great Nutrition

Microgreens are young vegetable greens that fall somewhere between sprouts and baby leaf vegetables.

Sprouts are technically the newly germinated seeds, while the microgreens are the 1-2 week-old youngster seedlings.

Sprouts grow more like a fungus, as they are provided with high humidity, an enclosed area, and a low light environment.

Whereas, microgreens grow more like a plant. It absorbs nutrients directly from the seed, soil, or nutrients added to water (if grown hypotonic) and light (photosynthesis).

Hydroponic grown microgreens
Hydroponic Grown Microgreens

Microgreens are rich in potassium, zinc, magnesium, iron, and copper – all of which are essential nutrients for the health of your body.

According to studies that have been conducted on microgreens, they contain up to 40 times more nutrients compared to their fully mature counterparts.

This means that you can get the right amounts of nutrients that you need for optimal health by just adding a few microgreens servings into your diet.

What Do Mircrogreens Taste Like

As noted above, these tiny and edible greens that grow from vegetable and herb seeds pack a nutritional punch and are absolutely delicious.

Generally speaking, microgreens have an intense aromatic flavor.

Here is a small list of the most popular microgreens grown out of over 100 varieties and their description of taste.

• Alfalfa – Mild, nutty, crunchy, pea-like taste

• Arugula – Nutty, peppery

• Broccoli – Mild, crunchy, dense, slightly bitter

• Clover – Mild earthy, nutty, crunchy, juicy

• Cress – Peppery, tangy

• Daikon Radish – Strong, Peppery

Daikon radish microgreen
Daikon Radish Microgreen

• Dun pea – Slight sweet, crunchy, robust flavor

• Kale – Mild, subtly sweet, broccoli-like taste

• Kohlrabi – Mild, sweet

• Lentils – Mild bitter, pea-like taste

• Mung bean – Mild bean taste, slight buttery

• Wheatgrass – Mild sweet, bitter, grassy

How To Use Microgreens

Apart from their nutrition, microgreens also give plated dishes visual appeal that is as a result of their delicateness and vibrancy.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Salad with Microgreens

Microgreens are not only important in giving your dish an appealing look, but also adds taste and texture to the plated food.

Microgreens can be used as a sandwich stuffer, with wraps, burritos, salads, soups, topped on fried or scrambled eggs, and used in smoothies among many other uses.

Pastrami Sandwich with Microgreens

Easy To Grow Year Round

The best part about growing microgreens is their ability to grow all year-round. You can grow them anywhere, whether you want to grow them indoors or in your garden.

Since you can grow them anywhere, you don’t have to wait for the right weather to set in so you can start growing them.

During summer, you can grow your microgreens anywhere as long as there is enough natural sunlight.

During the cooler seasons where sunlight hours are limited and temperatures drop below 40 degrees, you sprout the seeds in your home using a grow light to help them thrive.

Growing Microgreens Is Easy

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Tender flaky wild caught Alaskan salmon, prepared with a honey-miso glaze, that delicately sits over a bed of silky noodles, mango, avocado, radicchio, carrots, mint, basil, and peanuts tossed with a tasty refreshing vinaigrette.

It is a long list of fresh ingredients, but do not let the long list deter you.

If you are able to boil noodles, tear mint, shredded vegetables and open an oven door, you can handle this wonderfully delicious Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl.

What Is Radicchio

Radicchio, also known as Italian chicory, is a type of leafy chicory featuring dark reddish-purple leaves and white veins.

Though commonly mistaken for red cabbage or lettuce, radicchio has a distinctly bitter taste that goes well with many Italian dishes.

It’s a traditional ingredient in the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes whole plant foods.

What Ramen Noodles To Use

Ramen noodles are made with wheat flour that can be cooked and dehydrated after frying.

On the other hand, fresh ramen noodles are made with a combination of eggs, wheat, and alkalized water.

Why alkalized water? Alkaline water helps to give that unique and special springy texture to the noodles.

Fresh Made Ramon Noodles

These noodles also have that slurping texture because it’s made with the combination of gluten flour and higher protein count as well.

These noodles have yellow tones that are available in straight and wavy forms.

Some scientific research, though not conclusive, has suggested that consuming instant ramen noodles two or more times a week can increase the likelihood of developing heart disease, as well as diabetes and stroke, especially in women.

To make a fresh Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl, we suggest using all fresh ingredients, including fresh, not dehydrated, Ramon noodles.

Making homemade fresh Ramon Noodles – Image source: Cilantro and Citronella

Thai Salmon Noodle Bowl

Miso Salmon

4 6-ounce wild-caught sockeye salmon filets

1 tablespoon white (shiro) miso

1 teaspoon sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Vinaigrette

1/4 cup lime juice

1/4 cup peanut oil

1 tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon lite soy sauce

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon toasted sesame soil

1 teaspoon chili paste, optional

1 teaspoon lime zest, grated

1 garlic clove, minced

1 1/2 inch ginger, peeled and grated

The Bowl

8 ounces ramen or lo mein noodles

2 cups arugula

1 cup watercress, stems removed

1 cup radicchio, finely shredded

2 medium carrots, peeled and grated

2 fresno chilies, thinly sliced

1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro

1/2 cup loosely packed mint leaves, torn

1/2 cup loosely packed basil, torn

1/4 cup roasted and salted peanuts

1 large mango, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 hass avocado, cut into 1-inch cubes

Scallions, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Place salmon on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

In a bowl, mix to combine miso, vinegar, and honey. Brush mixture onto salmon evenly and top each filet with sesame seeds.

Roast salmon for 10 to 12 minutes (10 minutes for medium-rare / 12 minutes for medium) until it easily flakes with a fork.

While the salmon is cooking, boil the ramen noodles according to the package instructions. When complete, rinse briefly with cool water to stop the cooking process.

To make the vinaigrette, whisk lime juice, peanut oil, fish sauce, soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, chili paste, lime zest, garlic, and ginger in a bowl.

In a large bowl, toss to combine noodles, arugula, watercress, radicchio, carrots, chilies, cilantro, mint, basil, peanuts, and vinaigrette. Add mango and avocado and gently toss.

Fresh Ramon Noodles

Divide noodles into serving bowls, top with salmon, and garnish with scallions.

Serve with a squeeze of lime if desired.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Sprouts

Asian pears, also known as apple pears, are a healthy treat that present the best qualities of both the apple and pear.

The fruit is crunchy and sweet fruit that grows to be round like an apple. They do not change texture after picking or storage as do European pears such as the Bartlett or Comice.

Chilling Asian pearsChilling an Asian pear before eating can enhance the delicious flavor.

Asian Pear Health Benefits

According to OAW Health – if you have any of the following health problems, they suggest adding pears to your diet with these few noted health issues among many others:

• Acid reflux

• High cholesterol

• Gas – bloating – constipation – diarrhea

• Intestinal inflammation

• Insulin resistance

• Weight gain

What To Do With The Asian Pear

The pear is often given as a gift throughout East Asia, due to its long shelf-life and delicious flavor.

Because of its wonderful texture, you can enjoy these pears in stir-fries, as well as salads.

And how ironic, as the Asian pear is also called a “salad pear” in Japan.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Sprouts

1 cup daikon radish sprouts

2 cups Asian pears, washed and corded and chop into medium sized pieces

1 1/2 tbsp rice wine vinegar

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes chili flakes

1/8 tsp white pepper

2 1/2 tbsp raw honey

Combine vinegar, red pepper flakes, white pepper and honey – mix well until honey dissolves. Add Asian pear, daikon radish sprouts and carrot.

Mix well and set aside for flavors to meld for at least one hour.

Can be made up to a day in advance and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Serve at room temperature.

Goan Coconut Chicken Curry with Spiraled Sweet Potato

The Indian region of Goa is known for its tropical beaches and rich seafood curries.

This region of India is known for their Goan simmer sauces. They can be medium spiced to very spicy.

The flavors in this sauce include coconut, ginger, and tangy tamarind. Together they taste incredible when simmered with meat and vegetables.

The meats can include, lamb, goat and chicken. The vegetables can be an endless choice, such as broccoli, peas, carrots, onions, and cabbage.

Goan Coconut Chicken Curry with Spiraled Sweet Potato

1 lbs. boneless chicken thighs, cut into cubes

1/2 cup coconut milk

Salt to taste

1/4 tsp. turmeric powder

1 tbsp. lemon juice

2 tbsp. oil

1 1/2 tbsp. ginger-garlic paste finely chopped

1 medium yellow onion

1 tsp. Garam masala powder

1/2 tsp. red chili Red chilli powder

1 tsp. cumin powder

2-3 cups chicken stock

In a medium bowl add chicken, salt, turmeric powder and lemon juice and mix well. Set aside for 10 minutes.

Heat oil in a pan over medium heat. Add ginger-garlic paste, stir and sauté well. Add onion, mix and sauté on high heat till translucent.

Add chicken mix and stir in and cook for 1 minute. Add garam masala powder, chilli powder and cumin powder, stir in and cook till the oil separates.

Add chicken stock, stir to mix, cover and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Add coconut milk, mix well and simmer for 3-4 minutes.

In another pan over medium heat add 1 tbsp. oil. Next add spiraled sweet potatoes and cook just to warm spirals.

Next add warmed spirals to Goan sauce and mix in.

Plate and top with chopped spring onions, chopped cilantro and goat cheese.

Look how mouth watering delicious it is.