How To Cook Dried Beans

Mixed Legumes on paper and burlap - How To Cook Dried BeansSoaking dried beans or legumes in water first, helps with dissolving the raffinose sugars that can cause discomfort in the digestive system. Rinsing the beans after soaking and draining any water after cooking will further help to reduce the sugars as well.

soaking deied beans - How To Cook Dried Beans

Image credit: EHow

Here are some steps you can take to reducing the raffinose sugars, a complex carbohydrate found in most in most dried beans.

This type of sugar is also found in cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and asparagus, among other vegetables, and including whole grains.

The California Dry Bean Advisory Board recommend this method for gas-free beans.

  • Place 1 pound of beans in 10 cups of boiling water for 2-3 minutes
  • Remove from heat, cover and set aside overnight

 

Soaking the beans overnight helps to remove or dissolve between 75 to 90 percent of the indigestible raffinose sugars.

If you want, you can add 1/8 teaspoon of baking soda to the soaking water to help remove the raffinose sugars as well.

Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils

Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils

Delicious Living recommends soaking 1 cup of beans in 3 cups of water for 6 hours before cooking them.

After soaking the beans, drain them of the water, then rinse thoroughly. Now your beans are ready to be cooked.

When cooking the beans, you can add any herbs and spices, but do not add any salt or acidic ingredients, like vinegar, tomatoes or juice, which can considerably slow the cooking time. Add these ingredients when the beans are done cooking.

When cooking your beans you can use either water, or a stalk made from vegetables, beef or chicken.

Cooking times will vary depending on the type of beans you will be using. Most cooks will tell you that dried lentils or split peas do not require soaking, but they do require sorting and rinsing.

Keep in mind that cooking lentils in too much liquid, or over cooking them, will make them mushy. They should only be cooked for 20 minutes or until tender.

How to Use Cooked Beans

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup

Dried beans when cooked are very versatile, and although they have different flavors and textures, they can often be used interchangeably in recipes.

Cooked beans can be used to make soups, added as a topping to vegetable salads, add to cooked rice, couscous or pasta salads for texture.

Here are some of our featured recipes using cooked beans.

Garlic Lime Chicken Fajitas

Garlic Lime Chicken Fajitas – Featuring a side dish of quinoa with black beans, onion, corn, and chili pepper

Spicy Chorizo and Bean Soup

Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils

South Of The Border Chicken Tortilla Soup

Gluten Free BBQ Chicken Lasagna

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup

Garlic Lime Chicken Fajitas

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Bacon Eggs and Asparagus Benedict

Bacon Eggs and Asparagus Benedict

There are two and possible more accounts as too how Eggs Benedict came to be a sought after breakfast and Sunday brunch item.

The first account is from 1894 when Lemuel Benedict, a Wall Street broker, went into the Waldorf Hotel to get something to eat in the restaurant. It was said he had a hangover at the time.

He ordered some toast, crisp bacon, two pouched eggs, and a side of hollandaise sauce.

cookbook of the waldorf

Photo Credit: Chest of Books

A column in The New Yorker – Talk of the Town – had interviewed Mr. Benedict just before he died, in 1942.

During the interview he had made the claim that he had put the dish on the breakfast and luncheon menu of the Waldorf Hotel.

Mr. Benedict even claimed the Eggs Benedict recipe was published in the cookbook – Cookbook of the Waldorf  (author  Oscar Tschirky – printed 1896) because of him.

The second account is from 1967 when a claim was made by Edward P. Montgomery on behalf of commodore E.C. Benedict, as he wrote a letter to the New York Times, that included the recipe.

In the letter he claims to have received the recipe from his uncle, a friend of the commodore.

Variations of Eggs Benedict

There have been several different ways to make Eggs Benedict since its appearance to the culinary world. Most of us know it is an American breakfast dish that consists of two halves of an English muffin, topped with ham or bacon, poached eggs, and Hollandaise sauce (see our recipe here of Eggs Benedict with Hollendaise Sauce).

There are ten variations to date, and they include:

  • Eggs Blackstone – made with  streaky bacon and slices of tomatoes are added
  • Eggs Blanchard – Béchamel suace is used in place of the Hollandaise
  • Eggs Florentine – made with spinach in place of the ham or the spinach is added just underneath the ham
  • Eggs Mornay – made with a Mornay cheese sauce in place of the Hollandaise
  • Eggs Atlantic (also called Eggs Hemingway, or Eggs Copenhagen) – made with  smoked salmon. This variation is called “Eggs Benjamin” in a few restaurants in Canada
  • Huevos Benedictos – a Spanish style that is made with either sliced avocado or Mexican chorizo, and is topped with both a salsa roja (red sauce) and hollandaise sauce
  • Eggs Hussarde – made with Holland rusks in place of the English muffin and adds Bordelaise sauce
  • Irish Benedict – is made with corned beef or Irish bacon
  • Eggs Chesapeake – is made with crab cake, and tops the hollandaise sauce with a sprinkle of Old Bay Seasoning
  • Eggs Hebridean – is made with Black Pudding. This variation is common in Scotland, and uses black pudding from Stornoway

Here is our version of Eggs Benedict, though several may have made it in their kitchen before we did. We call it Bacon Eggs and Asparagus Benedict.

In large pot of boiling salted water, blanch asparagus until tender-crisp, about 2 minutes. With slotted spoon, transfer to bowl of ice water; drain and pat dry.

1 pound asparagus, trimmed

4 slices Canadian ham

4 slices 100% whole grain English muffin, toasted

Hollandaise Sauce:

4 egg yolks

1 stick of butter, no salt, melted

1 teaspoon lemon juice

sea salt and pepper to taste

Poached Eggs:

4 eggs

1 tbsp white vinegar) 

Making the Sauce:

In a 6 quart pot add water 1/4 way up. Bring water to a soft boil.

Add yolks and lemon juice to either a large glass or metal mixing bowl.

Place the bowl over the pot of soft boiling water and start to whisk the yolks over the simmering water until yolks become thick, about 2 to 3 minutes, removing from heat and putting back on. Do not stop whisking.

Remove from heat and add butter and whisk in. Next add sea salt and pepper to taste, whisk some more. If the sauce is to thick just add a few drops of water until you get a sauce again.

Bacon Eggs and Asparagus Benedict Poaching the Eggs:

Using the same pot of water add 2 to 3 teaspoons of white vinegar.

Next crack an egg into a small glass bowl and gently drop egg into boiling water for 2 minutes.

Do this with each egg. Remove pouched egg with a slotted spoon and place one egg on each slice of muffin.

Arranging the Plate:

Place 1 or two slices of the toasted English muffin on a plate. Next add 3 or 4 asparagus spires, then add ham, poached egg, and spoon on sauce.

 

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Excite Your Palate with Spice Roasted Vegetables

Excite Your Palate with Spice Roasted Vegetables

Spicing up vegetables is a sure way to add flavor and taste, even for those who are picky about eating them. Roasting the vegetables with spices caramelizes the seasoning while sealing in the flavor.

The spices enzymes and chemicals will be absorbed into the vegetables during roasting.

Finding the right spice and roasting style will make everyone want seconds.

To evenly coat the vegetables with a dry spice mix is best to mix in a little olive oil or if you wish to use a neutral flavored oil avocado oil could be used.

The best way to do this is add the oil and spices to the bottle of the mixing bowl first, then add the vegetables and mix.

Here are some ideas of what vegetables and spices to roast together.

Moroccan Style Spice Rub

Moroccan-Style Spice Rub

Photo by Scott Phillips

This spice mix will give vegetables a Moroccan blast of flavor.

This warm to the palate spice mix pairs especially well with sweeter or starchy vegetables such as butternut squash, carrots, cauliflower, potatoes and sweet potatoes.

2 tsp. ground cumin

1 tsp. ground coriander

1/2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. sweet paprika, preferably Hungarian

1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp. ground allspice

1/4 tsp. ground ginger

1/8 tsp. cayenne

A pinch of ground clove

In a small mason jar, mix all 10 spices.

To a large bowl add 1 teaspoon of the spice mix and 1 or 2 tablespoons of olive oil, add diced or chopped vegetables, and mix well.

Rosemary Thyme Lemon Oil

Rosemary and thyme Mix this infused oil with your vegetables before roasting to give them extra flavor. It’s a delectable complement to roasted beet, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrots and cauliflower.

Zest of 1 large lemon, removed in long strips with a vegetable peeler

2 tbs. extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed

1 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary

1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme

Over medium-low heat in a small saucepan, combine the lemon zest and oil. Cook until the lemon zest bubbles steadily for about 30 seconds.

Remove from heat and let cool, about 3 minutes. Stir in the herbs and let sit 20 minutes more before using. This allows for flavors to infuse.

Chop or dice the vegetables, add Rosemary Thyme Lemon Oil to large bowl, add vegetables and mix to coat well.

Rosemary and thyme are often used in meat dishes as well. Like roast beef and pork. Both herbs also work well with beans, cabbage, poultry, soups, and stews.

Ginger Lemon Soy Infusion

Give roasted vegetables an Asian flavor by mixing them up with this savory infusion. Try roasting it with: broccoli, beets, carrots and cauliflower.

1-inch piece fresh ginger

1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

½ tsp. soy sauce

Set a small fine strainer in a small bowl. Peel and finely grate the ginger. Put the grated ginger in the strainer and extract the ginger juice by pressing the ginger in the sieve with the back of a small spoon.

Transfer ½ teaspoon of ginger juice to another small bowl and discard the rest or save for another use. Stir in the lemon juice and soy sauce. Toss with a batch of vegetables after roasting.

With this spice mix so the flavor is not robbed by the strong flavor of olive oil, roast your vegetables with avocado oil, which has a neutral flavor.

Garlic and Coriander Oil

Garlic coriander This tasteful, spiced oil is made to be tossed with roasted vegetables as soon as they come out of the oven.

It tosses well with: roasted asparagus, roasted beets, broccoli, cauliflower or green beans.

Have this infused flavored oil ready as soon as the roasted vegetables are out of the oven.

1-1/2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

1 tbsp. finely chopped garlic (2 large cloves)

2 tsp. ground coriander

1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Himalayan salt and freshly ground black pepper

Set a small saucepan over medium-low heat, with combined olive oil and garlic. Cook until the smaller pieces of garlic turn light golden-brown, about 3 minutes.

Stir in the coriander and cook for about 20 seconds. Immediately remove from the heat and transfer to a small heatproof bowl to prevent overcooking. Keep warm.

Sprinkle the roasted vegetables with the lemon juice, season to taste with salt and pepper, and arrange on a serving platter. Spoon the toasted garlic oil over the vegetables.

For best results, we recommend using high-quality dried herbs, as they will not contribute to spoilage, and you will have a longer-lasting product.

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