Baking Cookies Everyone Will Enjoy

Closeup of a tray of fresh baked cookies, Chocolate Chip, oatmeal raisin Chocolate and white chocolate chip cookies on baking sheet and parchment paper -Baking Cookies Everyone Will EnjoyMost everyone enjoys a good cookie. But if you were to take a poll, and ask people what is a good baked cookie for them? Some might say, a cookie that is thin and crispy, another may say, soft and chewy, and yet another, light and cakey.

Crisp and Thin Chocolate Chip Cookies

Image Credit: Thin & Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies by: Handle The Heat

Do you have cookie lovers in your home who may prefer a cookie that is made the way they like it, that is crispy, or chewy, and possibly light and cake like? We have the solution to please all cookie lovers in your life.

To get a Thin & CrispySoft & ChewyLight & Cakey cookie, you need to make a slight modification to the ingredients in the cookie recipe.

Let’s use a basic Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe. The following ingredients do not include the butter and sugar, as these ingredients are what determines what your cookies out come will be.

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 large eggs, room temperature

12 ounces chocolate baking chips

soft and chewy whole grain peanut butter cookie

Image Credit: Soft & Chewy Whole Grain Peanut Butter Cookies – by: An Oregon Cottage

If you want a Thin & Crispy cookie, you add this amount of butter, and sugar, with the addition of brown sugar.

2 1/2 sticks butter, softened

1 1/4 cups sugar

3/4 cup brown sugar

If you want a Soft & Chewy cookie, you add this amount of butter, and sugar, with the addition of brown sugar.

2 sticks butter, softened

1/2 cup sugar

1 cup brown sugar

soft and chewy whole grain peanut butter cookie

Image Credit: Soft & Chewy Whole Grain Peanut Butter Cookies – by: An Oregon Cottage

If you want a Light & Cakey cookie, you add this amount of butter, and sugar, with the addition of brown sugar.

Take note, that in this adjustment you use unsalted butter.

1 3/4 sticks unsalted butter, softened

3/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup brown sugar

Baking Cookies 101

How does sugar effect cookies? To answer, we will share a little Cookie 101.  All sugars, either granulated, brown, powder or confectioners, have the ability to attract water. By doing so, sugars attraction of moisture helps keep it away from structure builders of the cookie, like the starch and proteins that are present in the flour and eggs.

The adjustment in the amount of sugar you do or do not put will determine the structure or substance of your baked cookies.

Another suggestion that will help to please your cookie lovers is using room temperature ingredients, particularly the butter and eggs.

How many recipes have you seen that call for room-temperature butter and eggs? Quite a few. Bon Appetit says that it’s a step you should not ignore, as many baked goods start by creaming together butter and sugar, which is made infinitely easier with gently warmed ingredients.

Is creaming the butter and sugar a big deal? Yes it is. Bon Appetit says, “Creaming together butter and sugar with a handheld or stand mixer, for example, should be done before the addition of wetter ingredients, like eggs. Why? The fat in butter holds air, and when whipped, expands. In the creaming process, sharp sugar granules slice through the butter, creating air pockets that ultimately give the pastry lift. Skip that step (or do it half-heartedly) and your end result will be dense and heavy (BonAppetit).

Here is Amanda Grant, editor of The Co-operative Food magazine to show us how to properly cream butter and sugar together.

Now you know how to make a cookie, that all cookie lovers in your life will go for. And you may just become, the Master Baker At Baking The Perfect Cookie.

What Others Are Reading:

President’s Day – The Favorite Meals Of Washington and Lincoln

Presidents Day - The Favorite Meals Of Washington and Lincoln

George Washington was one of the only founding father of the United States to run an estate with financial success. He claimed several positions during his life time, which included among others, being a general, diplomat, farmer, distiller, and president of the United States of America.

He enjoyed many foods and drink, from porter made on the battlefield to cherries from his orchards at Mount Vernon.

He was one of the richest landowners in Virginia, and throughout the 13 colonies. And because of his wealth, he no doubt had  access to exquisite delicacies. But as we know from history, George Washington wore dentures, and he with out question, may have preferred to eat soft things, such as cornmealhoe cakes,” puddings and soups.

Hoe cakes were first called JohnnyCake, were as some say they were first called Shawnee Cakes after the Native American tribe in the Tennessee Valley (USA).

Cornbread Gospels cookbookpicture of Crescent DragonwagonCrescent Dragonwagon, who is a female cookbook writer, authored the cookbook, The Cornbread Gospels, which includes a recipe that Washington enjoyed.

Dragonwagon herself even lives in Virginia.  One of the recipes from her book is “George Washington’s Hoe Cakes.”

The Mount Vernon website writes that family members and visitors alike testified that hoe cakes were among George Washington’s favorite foods. He invariably ate them at breakfast, covered with butter and honey, along with hot tea.

The History Chef writes that according to his step-granddaughter, Nelly Custis Lewis, George Washington liked to rise with the sun, read or write until seven a.m., then he would go downstairs for his favorite breakfast of three small hoe cakes  with butter and honey and three cups of tea without cream.

 

Hoecakes - image credit Harmonious Homestead

Hoecakes – Image credit : Harmonious Homestead

8 3/4 cups white cornmeal

1 1/4 teaspoons dry yeast

1 egg

Warm water

¼ teaspoon salt, optional

Honey and Butter for topping

In large container, mix together 4 cups white cornmeal, 1 1/4 teaspoons dry yeast, and enough warm water to give the mixture the consistency of pancake batter (probably 3 to 4 cups). Cover and set on the stove or counter overnight.

In the morning, gradually add remaining cornmeal, egg, and enough warm water to give the mixture the consistency of pancake batter (about 3 to 4 cups). Cover and set aside for 15 to 20 minutes.

Add cooking grease to a griddle or skillet and heat until water sprinkled into it will bead up.

Pour batter, by the spoonful, onto the hot griddle. (Note: Since the batter has a tendency to separate, you will need to stir it well before pouring each batch.) When the hoecake is brown on one side, turn it over and brown the other. Serve warm with butter and honey.

the book Lincolns Table A Presidents Culinary Journey from Cabin to CosmopolitanWhat was Abraham Lincoln’s favorite food? The book Lincoln’s Table, authored by Donna D. McCreary writes that Lincoln was fortunate to be part of a family that boasted of several good cooks.

She writes that his hearty appetite as a boy was satisfied by foods like wild game, pork, fish, vegetables and fruit grown on the family’s farm. She also notes he too enjoyed corn cakes. As an adult his palate was introduced to other favorites – oysters (Oyster Stew his favorite), pecan pie, and lemon cake.

Some sources say that President Lincoln did have two favorite dishes, Chicken Fricassee with Biscuits and Oyster Stew.

Here’s a recipe for Fricassee with Biscuits, courtesy of Elizabeth’s Daisies 

Fricassee with Biscuits, courtesy of Elizabeth's Daisies

Fricassee with Biscuits – Image Credit:  Elizabeth’s Daisies

4 1/2 teaspoons all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon pepper

1/8 teaspoon dried thyme

1 chicken breast or 2 chicken thighs, skin removed

2 tablespoons olive oil

3/4 cup sliced fresh mushrooms

1/2 cup diced onion

1/4 cup diced celery

3/4 cup chicken broth

1 small bay leaf

1/4 cup milk

2 teaspoons parsley

Combine the 2 1/4 teaspoons flour, salt, pepper, and thyme in bowl large enough to fit chicken. Coat chicken in flour mixture. In a small skillet, brown chicken in olive oil. Remove chicken and set aside. In same skillet saute the mushrooms, onion, and celery until crisp-tender. Return chicken to the pan. Add chicken broth and bay leaf. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 30-35 minutes or until chicken juices run clear.

Place remaining flour mixture in a bowl, stir in milk until smooth. Stir into pan juices. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Discard bay leaf. Sprinkle with parsley.

Biscuits

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup shortening

3/4 cup milk

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

In a large mixing bowl combine flour, baking powder and salt. Cut shortening with fork or pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Pour milk into flour mixture while stirring with a fork. Mix in milk until dough is soft, moist, and pulls away from the side of the bowl.

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and toss with flour until no longer sticky. Roll dough out into a 1/2 inch think sheet and cut with floured biscuit or cookie cutter.

Place biscuits on non greased baking sheets and bake in a preheated oven until golden brown, about 10 minutes.

What Others Are Reading:

Mango Coconut Rice Pudding

Mango Coconut Rice PuddingMango season in the Northern hemisphere is April to October. One does not need special skills to eat the ripe fruit. Simply peel the fruit and bite into its juicy flesh.

Many love to eat the raw skin of the fruit as well. Myself personally, I have never tried to eat the peel. Now days you can find the mango dried, or frozen. In both cases the mango is still sweet in flavor. You can juice the mango, which I have with fresh blueberries, what a yummy smoothie.

Mexico's Tasty MangoesYou can make mango salsa and even in India they make Mango Jam. Mangoes do not grow in mild to cooler climates, they are grown in tropical regions of the earth. In 2012 the consumption of mangoes by Americans was up 30% over the prior 5  years.

If you are familiar with NPR or National Public Radio (USA), they had a report the morning of April. 9, 2013 entitled “Demand Is High For Mexico‘s Magnificent Mangoes”.

Take a moment to listen. Just Click Here to listen to the 1 1/2 minute NPR Report – another window will open to here report.

Our featured recipe:

Mango Coconut Rice Pudding

1 – 14 ounce can coconut milk
¼ cup Arborio rice
1/8 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. sugar
1/6 tsp. nutmeg, ground
1/6 tsp. cinnamon, ground
¼ cup mango (pureed)
some macadamia nuts (chopped, optional)

Place the coconut milk, rice, salt, sugar and cardamom in a sauce pan and bring to a boil.

Reduce the heat and simmer for 25-35 minutes stirring occasionally.

Remove from heat and let cool. Mix in the mango and garnish with chopped macadamia nuts.

What Others are Saying About Mangoes:

Image credit: Closet Cooking

Enhanced by Zemanta