How To Use Household Cleaners With Safety

Shelves in pantry with cleaners for home close-up - household cleanersToday’s household cleaning products not only make life easier, they are said to make it a lot healthier, as well. Whatever the cleaning challenge, you can probably find a product that’s perfectly suited to getting the job done right.

Cleaning and killing germs are serious business, plus the medical community agrees that cleanliness practices — such as regular hand washing and keeping your living area clean, are key in reducing the spread of infectious diseases.

Today many individuals, like us here at Splendid Recipes and More have turned to cleaning products that have been labeled “Green,” meaning their products that are environmentally friendly to the earth, as well as the one using the product.

Using Household Cleaners With Safely

But what if you the reader hasn’t decided yet to give up traditional cleaning products as of yet, like all-purpose cleaners, ammonia, bleach, and toilet bowl cleaners, among many others, are you cautious when using them?

The following information are reminders for cautious cleaning when using such cleaning products.

all-purpose cleaner - household cleanersAll-Purpose Cleaner

Some commonly purchased all-purpose cleaners include:

These type of products are designed for diverse in home tasks.

The FDA recommends not using such cleaners that contain antibacterial properties, like dimethyl benzyl ammonium, which is an organic salt (note: not all salts are inorganic like NaCl), composed of the (negative) anion Chloride (Cl-) and an organic (positive) cation, dimethyl ethyl benzyl ammonium ion (Yahoo Answers).

The FDA says that cleaning products with antibacterial agents can actually help create forms of bacteria that are much harder to kill or disinfect.

The Journal Antimicrobial Chemotherapy published a study in 2008 on the use of antibacterial consumer products containing ammonium compounds and drug resistance in the community.

The researchers reported that after 1 year of assigned product usage, were one group used cleaning products with ammonium compounds and triclosan, were as the other group received cleaning products without antibacterial agents – and found that the group using ammonium compounds and including triclosan made bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli resistant to one or more antibiotics.

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The More You Know

Antibacterial Cleaners: Can They Do More Harm Than Good?

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Ammonia

ammonia - household cleanersTrace quantities of ammonia are found in the earth’s atmosphere, which is produced by the decaying process of nitrogenous animals and vegetable matter. Ammonia and ammonium salts are also found in rainwater but in small quantities.

The global industrial production of ammonia in 2014 was 176,300,000 tonnes,  a 16% increase over the 2006 global industrial production 152,000,000 tonnes (Waste Disposal Professionals).

Ammonia can cut grease, but so can many other cleaners. If you use this solution for doing so, it is best to dilute it with 8 parts water to 1 part ammonia. When mixing, always add the water to the ammonia, and not the other way around.

When working with ammonia wear gloves and in a ventilated area. The solution though found in nature, can cause blindness if splashed into the eyes. It may be best to wear eye coverings when using it.

CAUTION: Never mix ammonia with bleach. If you do, it will cause a vapor that will immediately cut off your breathing as the vapor enters your lungs. If you pass out, CPR will not revive you.

Bleach

clorox bleach - household cleanersBleach is a powerful bacteria killer. It is best for use to wipe away mildew or cleaning the kitchen surface after preparing raw meats.

CAUTION: Be careful not to mix bleach with toilet-bowl cleaners or ammonia.

Always wear gloves and work in a ventilated area to protect yourself when cleaning with bleach.

Glass Cleaner

windex - household cleaners

The name speaks for itself, as glass cleaner is used to clean glass and windows.

It is best not to use full strength ammonia-based window cleaners.

Test performed by Consumer Reports noted that you can dilute glass cleaners and still get your windows and glass clean.

Toilet-Bowl Cleaner

These cleaners are used to not only clean, but also disinfect your toilet. A word of Caution from the American Association of Poison Control Centers, corrosive toilet-bowl cleaners are top on the list as the most dangerous toxic cleaning solution found in homes.

It is recommended to only use such toilet-bowl cleaners when you really need them for rust and stains.

Toilet-Bowl Cleaner - Household cleanersKeep in mind that there is no US law that requires manufacturers of cleaning products to list ingredients on their labels or to test their products for safety.

It is also estimated that the average US home contains anywhere from 3 to 25 gallons of toxic materials, most of which are in cleaners.

Labels of household cleaners that contain the words,  DANGER, WARNING and POISON give only a general idea about the seriousness of the substances a product contains. In fact, a New York Poison Control Center study found that 85% of product warning labels are inadequate (GAIAM Life).

These are household cleaners that contain the words DANGER, WARNING and POISON:

  • Drain cleaners
  • Oven cleaners
  • Laundry detergents
  • Glass cleaners
  • Floor and furniture polish

The take away of this article should be to use caution and safety when using traditional household cleaners.

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Preparing a Natural All Organic Meal

Preparing a Natural All Organic Meal - header image

Many recipes humans have prepared for generations, have withstood the test of time, and not simple because the ingredients taste good together, but are enjoyed because they are more nutritious together than they are on their own.

Many who know basics of cooking have learned the spices and herbs that go well with certain foods to complement their flavors, making the dish more desirable and palatable.

The first private cooking school to open in the United States was in 1877 and was named the Boston Cooking School. The most notable was the creation of The Culinary Institute of America in 1946. Culinary schools educate future culinary professionals, teaching them the theory behind cooking, baking, and why certain foods go well together over others.

In this article we want to present the preparation of a natural all organic meal, using flavorings that are not traditionally used in preparing a meal, that includes a leafy green or side dishes and including a meat.

Garlic and Thyme Mashed PotatoesLet’s start to the right of the plated food with the Garlic and Thyme Mashed Potatoes, and here is what you will need.

1½ pounds medium red or Yukon Gold potatoes (3 or 4)

½ cup milk, use full fat milk

2 cloves garlic, smashed

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

¾ tablespoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt

⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Peel potatoes and cut them in half. Place them in a medium saucepan and cover with cold water to 2 inches above potatoes. Bring to a boil then lower the heat to medium and simmer until the potatoes are very tender and can be easily pierced with a fork, about 18 to 22 minutes.

Meanwhile, peel and mash the garlic, set aside.

milk-butter mix for - Garlic and Thyme Mashed PotatoesAdd the milk, salt, butter, thyme, and garlic to a medium sauce pan over medium heat, and bring to a soft boil. Turn heat off and let sit until the potatoes are cooled.

cooling potatoes for - Garlic and Thyme Mashed PotatoesWhen the potatoes are cooked, place a colander in the sink and drain the potatoes, do not rinse. Let them sit for about 10 to 15 minutes.

Return them to the same saucepan, and mash them, then add the liquid and mash in till well incorporated.

If needed, add a little more milk for a creamier consistency.

Now, let’s look at the center bottom of the plate in the header image and we will not the Orange Ginger and Rainbow Carrot’s. The simple ingredients used in this dish make it worth preparing. Here is what you will need.

Orange Ginger and Rainbow Carrot's1 bunch of rainbow carrots, washed and sliced

1/8 cup ginger syrup (can be purchased at your local health food store, such as Whole Foods Market, or Natural Grocers)

1 1/2 tablespoons orange zest

Cook carrots in a steamer until just tender. Remove and place into a vegetable serving bowl and add ginger syrup and orange zest and mix in.

 

 

Chopped Kale with Drizzled Maple SyrupNow let’s look to the upper left side of the plate and we will see the Chopped Kale with Drizzled Maple Syrup. This is what you will need.

1 bunch of kale, washed and leaves trimmed from steams

1/8 cup of extra-virgin olive oil

1/8 cup of real maple syrup

Chop leaves and set aside. To start add 1/8 cup each of the olive oil and syrup to the bottom of a salad bowl.

Add chopped greens and toss. After tossing, fork some greens to see if the oil and syrup ratio fit your needs, it not add a little more oil and syrup till it is just right.

At the top of the plate sits some thin cut boneless pork chops, that were rubbed with a Mayan Coffee Rub, that we purchased at the Whole foods Market. The rub also includes Mayan chocolate and other spices. Rub both sides of the chops, and let sit for about 30 minutes.

Place a large ceramic coated frying pan over medium-low heat, add 4 to 5 tablespoons of Irish Butter (or any butter churned from grass fed cow’s). Let melt, and when warmed add chops and slow cook, turn chops every 5 minutes, and cook till the internal meat temperature is 160 degrees.

Preparing a Natural All Organic Meal - footer image

Plate your food and enjoy. Remember, all of the ingredients used were all organic natural foods. With the natural flavors, not only will your palate  thank you, but so will your health.

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