Honey Has Healing Power

Honey Has Healing Power

Honey has many uses in our lives. We my use it to sweeten our coffee or tea. We may use it as a substitute for sweetening our food creations, either it be cooking or baking.

Splendid Recipes did post an article: Cooking with Honey – The Healthy Sweetener.

Are you aware of the healing powers of honey? You may think of the most popular one, being used as a cough remedy. But there are a lot more.

Here is an article from the Health News library I thought you would enjoy: The Healing Powers of Honey.

The article goes on to say:

When you go to the grocery store, you see an entire shelf dedicated to various types of honey. One of the great things about honey is how good is tastes.

If you have heard about the power of honey as a healing remedy, it’s important to note that it is found with raw honey. Raw honey has not been “sterilized” with high heat, and it has not had anything added to it…READ MORE

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Check out our Desserts and if you wish to substitute the sugar for honey, do the following:

use 13th/16th of a  cup of honey — that’s 1 cup minus 3 tablespoons. Reduce other liquids in the recipe by 3 tablespoons.

You’ll also find some vinaigrette‘s here that use honey or sugar that you can substitute for honey: Vinaigrette’s to Complete Your Salad.

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Remember the healing powers of honey, it has medicinal qualities, it kills germs, soothes burns, fights coughs, helps heal wounds, helps with dry skin. That’s the power of honey.

Read the article here The Healing Power of Honey.

What Others are Saying About Honey:

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Protect Foods from Spoilage with Fermentation

Protect Foods from Spoilage with Fermentation

It’s amazing that the three types of microorganisms that preserve food during the fermentation process can also cause spoilage. The good news is that it’s fairly easy to keep food from spoiling by knowing which temperature and processing methods to use.

Food spoilage can cause illnesses that can keep you down for awhile, so it’s important to know how the spoiling microorganisms work to avoid the situation. Almost any type of food can be fermented and preserved with no danger whatsoever of developing an illness because of spoilage.

Yeasts come in two types – true and false. The true yeast found in the fermentation process helps to metabolize the sugar and produce gases (carbon dioxide) and alcohol. False yeast occur in foods that contain high acid or sugar levels and grow on a food’s surface rather than within as in the fermenting process.

Bacteria’s worst type of food spoilage is food poisoning. There are spore and non-spore bacteria that grow in low-acid foods such as meat and some vegetables. This type of bacteria can be destroyed by heat and processing for a certain length of time. Pressure cookers are often used to destroy bacteria at high temperature.

Molds are especially harmful to humans if the person has an allergic reaction to them. When someone eats a moldy food, it usually causes stomach discomfort and diarrhea and vomiting. Molds can grow in highly acidic foods, just like yeasts, but can be destroyed by subjecting the foods to high temperatures.

If fresh (uncooked) foods aren’t fermented or cooked, they can produce enzymes that can cause illnesses. One of the reasons why it’s important to pack foods you want to ferment so tightly is that oxidation may occur causing the food to change colors or become rancid.

Protecting fermenting foods from spoiling involves using starter cultures, limiting oxidation and using salt or brine for packing the foods. Sometimes an acidic fruit juice is used to protect the food such as a bit of lemon juice.

The main object of protecting the fermentation process is to get the fermenting process going before the spoilers have a chance to become established in the food. After that is accomplished, the spoilers lose their foothold.

Find out more about preserving foods by fermentation by searching online and taking advantage of books and reports that have been written about the process. Cookbooks for fermenting are also available if you want to try your hand at it.

How to ferment foods bookTo get you started, here is a book you can read on your Kindle for FREE. Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones and tablets. The boook to download and read is: Fermented Foods: How to Ferment Vegetables [Kindle Edition].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Others are Saying About Fermentation:

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Elegant Entertaining Without Breaking the Bank

preparing for a dinner partyDo you always wait for a special occasion to have a dinner party? You know the saying – More Happiness in Giving than in Receiving – , so why wait for that special occasion. It has been scientifically proven doing something for others, is good for your health. When you’re having a good time at parties laughing, it literally strengthens your heart. Who doesn’t want a healthy heart?

Now you might be saying, “I don’t have a creative bone in my body-how will I decorate without spending a fortune?  Or, what will I serve?”

Relax and take a deep breath, because we have the answers, with a few tips hints on how to create an affordable elegance that you can enjoy just as much as your guests.

To start you don’t have to spend huge amounts of money on anything that will only be used once. Start by looking around your home and see what you can use to complement a specific theme. Depending on the time of year you can do the following.

If you’re hosting a luncheon for family or a group of friends, gather potted plants from inside and outside your home and place them in the dining area for a lush, garden theme. Make place cards by writing each guest’s name on a leaf.

For an inexpensive table centerpiece, if you live near pine trees, fill a long platter or wicker basket with pine cones, fresh fruit, nuts, small white birch logs and baby pumpkins.

Maybe you have your own ideas…share them with us in the comment area below.

Now to answer the next question: “What will I serve?”

If you are making a main course, keep it simple and stick with what you know. Take advantage of convenience items such as pre-chopped vegetables or rotisserie chickens (check out our 30 minutes or less dinner ideas).

Don’t be afraid to ask friends or family to bring simple side dishes such as a marinated salad or potato dish (here’s a few of our side dish ideas).

pouring a glass of wineAt your formal gatherings, why not receive your guests with a glass of wine? Have a small table set up with wine glasses and a bottle of wine (it doesn’t have to be an expensive wine) at your entry way to your home. When your guests knock on the door, you answer it, let your guests in, take their coat and offer them a glass of wine while you are pouring it.

cold cuts and cheese for informal gatheringsFor less formal gatherings, purchase finger foods or snacks that your guests can enjoy while in good conversation. There’s mixed nuts, cold cuts, crackers and exotic cheeses, prepared salads and fresh salsa and chips.

Here are a few finger food recipes you could serve at your informal gathering: Brown Sugar Finger Wings or Bacon Wrapped Green Beans

What if your guests arrive and you are a little behind? Will you can anticipate that, because you will have appetizers to satisfy them while they wait for the main course. Here are some ideas:  Peach Mango Salsa served with chips. Try these ideas as well, link here.

Don’t forget your favorite beverages, and festive music, and you’re well on your way to hosting an “Affair to Remember!”

See What Others are Having Dinner or Lunch Gatherings

Header Image credit: stockbroker / 123RF Stock Photo

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Nine Things to Consider When Storing Organic Food

 

 

organic produce marketAn interesting thing happens when foods aren’t laden with artificial preservatives or any unnecessary processing.

And that thing is they don’t last as long as less natural options.

Add to that, the fact that organic foods tend to be more expensive, any spoilage can be very costly. So considering all this, here are some things to keep in mind when storing your organic foods.

1. Buy produce in season. Out of season fruits and vegetables generally have a longer travel time, so that can reduce the amount of time you’ll be able to keep them before they spoil. Local produce is also often cheaper and it helps ensure maximum nutrient content. When produce is shipped long distances, it is often harvested just a little earlier than it normally should be.

2. Wash your produce. Never assume that the lack of pesticides means produce doesn’t need to be washed. Dirt can still have bacteria and other harmful substances.

cleaning fruit

3. Whole fruits can be stored in the usual manner. Use your crisper or storage containers in your fridge. Of course, some produce like bananas, avocados, tomatoes, potatoes and onions shouldn’t be refrigerated. If you cut up any fruits or vegetables, store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

5. Store grains like flour and pasta in airtight containers. It will keep longer if you store in the fridge (up to 6 months) and even longer in the freezer (up to 1 year).

6. Fresh meat and poultry needs to be used fairly quickly. Large cuts last up to 4 days; items like steaks, chops and chicken pieces last up to 3 days; and ground meats should be used within a day or two.

7. Freeze meats that won’t be used right away. Do the same for excess fruits and vegetables you won’t be able to use. Make sure all products you freeze are in airtight packaging. When using storage containers, make sure to fill them as full as possible, so buy a variety of sizes for best results. Any extra air in your container can contribute to freezer burn.

8. Canning is another possibility for organic produce. You can create jams, pickle a variety of items, make compotes, can fruits and vegetables in water and more. Of course, do note that the high temperatures in canning can affect the nutritional quality of your produce.

canning pickles

9. Dehydrating food can also help with preservation. Dehydrated fruits make a great on-the-road snack, instead of processed food items. In addition, dehydrated produce is excellent for emergency kits, camping trips and more.

However you store your food, include a date on the packaged food item before you store it. This will give you an idea of when foods might spoil and which items should be used first.

Next theme link here: The Eternal Debate: Does Organic Living Require Supplements

What Others are saying about Going Organic

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Foods to Freeze for Later Use

Foods to Freeze for Later Use

Fruit in Season: Cut up and freeze peaches, cantaloupe, pineapple, or apples for a year-round vitamins and minerals. Before freezing add juice of half a lemon juice to the cut up fruits, to prevent browning while boosting vitamin C. Vitamin C is a heat sensitive vitamin not found in canned fruits.

Here is a video on how to freeze apples.

Freezing cantaloupe is simple. Cut in half…each half cut into four….remove the rind completely as well as the seeds. Leave in strips and place into freezer bags with wax paper in between fruit. Store the melon frozen from 4 to 6 months.

Pineapple is frozen the same a melons. Remove outer layer as well as all eyes, cut into rings, chunks etc. Place into freezer container with wax paper between fruit. Store up to 6 months.

Nuts: Nuts are a healthy fat. Now days they are too expensive to store at room temperature as they can go rancid. Protect their nutrition and your investment by storing them in the freezer.

Berries: Fresh berries can be frozen in your freezer. These include blueberries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. Rich in vitamins and fiber, these low-carb fruit fruits give you nutrients and anti-aging antioxidants.

Here is a video on flash freezing blackberries and strawberries, but can apply to any berry.

Citrus Juice: Freshly squeezed citrus loses its vitamin C when bottled because of being pasteurized, which is a heating process to kill germs, but also destroys vitamin C. Freeze fresh juiced lemons, limes, oranges and grapefruits. Store the juice in ice-cube trays and use later when preparing recipes that require fresh juice or to use to prepare dressings for fruit salads, or to infuse water and teas with fruit juice.
Fresh Vegetables: Buy seasonal local vegetables at your Farmers Market and freeze them for autumn and winter use. Freezing them also retains their vitamins, minerals, plant chemicals and fibers unlike canned vegetables. You’ll also avoid consuming processed additives like sodium or sulfites. You can fresh freeze asparagus, beets, broccoli, green beans, peas, and carrots.

To freeze prepare the vegetables buy cutting them into your preferred sizes (peas not included), for carrots leave on their skin for added fiber.

Bring to boil 4 quarts of water and add cut vegetables and blanch for 3 minutes and remove from hot water and add to iced water for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from iced water and place into freezer bags or containers. You can store vegetables frozen up to 9 months.

Image courtesy of : Dessert Now Dinner Later

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