Which Tomato Will You Grow For Your Homemade Sauce

Which Tomato Will You Grow For Your Homemade Sauce

With thousands of tomato varieties available today, selecting the variety of tomatoes you want to grow in your garden can seem like an overwhelming project. Tomatoes are very diverse, as each variety offers up its own unique set of characteristics, such as flavor, size, and even color.

Is your objective for growing tomatoes to serve up tasty tomato sauce, then it would be well worth knowing that some varieties, not all, are better suited for making the sauce.

There are some speciers of tomatoes that have few seeds in their flesh, and a firm meaty texture. Let’s take a look at 5 varieties that fit the bill for a tasty tomato sauce. These 5 varieties of tomatoes may be familiar to you, and possible not.

Great Choices Of Tomatoes For Your Perfect Sauce

Russian Big Roma

Russian Big Roma at a Farmers Market

Russian Big Roma

The University Of California – Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners program says the Russian Big Roma is disease-resisting, and a favorite heirloom paste variety, as well as using to make sauces.

Unlike most paste and sauce tomatoes, this is an indeterminate variety which produces lots of large (2 x 4 inch), dark red fruit, with a splendid “tomatoey” flavor.

San Marzano

Compared to the Roma tomato, the San Marzano tomatoes are thinner and more pointed. The flesh is much thicker with fewer seeds, and the taste is stronger, sweeter and less acidic. Expert tomato growers describe the taste as bittersweet.

Again, the Mater Gardener’s program says the San Marzano is a “Tomato Festival” favorite.

This Italian tomato variety produces an 8 ounce, deep red fruit, that is 4 inches in length. And though the San Marzano in the raw or uncooked has a lot to be desired in respects to flavor, the process of cooking them down to make sauce releases magic qualities, and therefore you will want to grow them year after year.

Polish Linguisa

Polish Linguisa tomato

Image credit: Tomato Geeks

The Polish Linguisa is a variety of tomato from Eastern Europe, and it was brought to the USA by Polish gardeners in the 1800’s.

This particular tomato has bright red fruit, and according to the Tomato Geeks, it has a broad range of uses:

  • Paste
  • Sauce
  • Canning
  • Drying
  • Freezing

Jersey Devil

one half pound Jersy Devil tomato

Image Credit: Teresa Giovanzana

The Jersey Devil tomato is a extremely prolific producer of 4-5” long, bright red fruit that are shaped like banana peppers.

They are very meaty and sweet, with few seeds. The Master Gardeners say it is an excellent tomato for canning as well as eating fresh.

Teresa Giovanzana boasts a 1/2 pound Jersey Devil in the 2013 tomato season.

Amish Paste

Amish Paste tomatoes produce bright red fruit up to 12 ounces that vary greatly in shape from ox-heart to a rounded plum shape.

From the Pennsylvania Amish (USA), the tomato is a large, meaty, bright red heirloom with superior taste, and a nice balance of sweet and acid.

The Amish Paste has been chosen by Organic Gardening magazine as a top paste tomato, as it is juicier than most other paste tomato varieties. Though it is a great tomato to make paste, it also is worth eating straight from the garden. Add some to your favorite salad or sandwich, but make sure you save enough to makes lots of thick and full-bodied sauce!

Tomatoes on VineAll the tomato varieties above are – indeterminate, also called vining tomatoes. The plant will grow continuously until it dies, usually in Fall with the first deep frost.

Once they produce flowers and set tomatoes they will do so continuously until the plant dies.

The five tomato varieties that we reviewed, is far from comprehensive, as there are lots of other terrific choices that can be used to make succulent pastes and sauces.

These tomatoes are a great starting point, because you can easily find seeds at your local garden centers or online. Try adding some or all of them to your garden this year for truly outstanding results during harvest time.

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Ingredients For Delicious Winter Salads

An younf woman eating a warm winter saladFood crops harvested in winter months with the use of hoop houses or hot houses (such as used in California, USA) and other methods that extend the natural growing season, and old-fashioned storage vegetables like cabbages and potatoes all mean that there are plenty of winter produce to choose from.

What winter produce that is available, is sufficient to enjoy delicious winter salads along with great homemade dressings and vinaigrette’s.

The different crops available in the winter months include among others:

Beets: Available in season from fall through spring in temperate climates, and those available during the summer months, are from storage.

Belgian Endive: This leafy green is forced to produce under artificial conditions, making them available year round. Their traditional season, as with all chicories, is late fall through winter.

When grown in open fields they are covered with sand for about 6 months to keep out the light. When grown in hot houses they are placed in darkness for 6 months before shipping to market for purchase.

Read more here about the endive (includes a recipe with video): Endive and Fruit Salad with Chicken

Broccoli: This and all other cruciferous vegetables can be grown year-round in temperate climates, but broccoli tastes best when harvested in the cooler temperatures of fall in most climates.

salad plate with Warm Winter Salad with Apples Spinach Blue Cheese and Walnuts

Warm Winter Salad with Apples Spinach Blue Cheese and Walnuts

Brussels sprouts: These vegetables are part of the cabbage family.  They grow on stalks, and they last somewhat longer than when sold packaged or removed from their stalks.

Cabbage: This vegetable is crispy when raw with bitter flavor, though it mellows and sweetens the longer it’s cooked.

Sweet Potatoes: This root vegetable is often referred too or interchangeable with yams. The two vegetables are different though.

Most yams in the USA are sweet potatoes. Yams are dry and starchy, and grown mainly in Africa and Asia. They can weigh up too 100 pounds.

Sweet potatoes store very well and are available year round in warmer areas. Though their season is from late summer through winter.

Other vegetables available in fall to winter months include, radicchio, radishes, turnips, winter squash, rutabagas, parsnips, chard, collard greens, cress, spinach, kale, carrots, leeks, fennel, and celery among others.

There are also a verity of fruits in season during the winter months that you can enjoy in fruit salads, or as a snack. To view the available in season winter fruits link here: Fruits Info – Seasonal Fruits.

Salads To Enjoy In The Winter Months

Chilly temperatures, and dark winter days are traditionally suited to cheese, meat, and vegetable casseroles, including pastas. A salad filled with raw vegetables may not seem appealing in the cold winter.

But what if you could prepare a warm winter salad, like this one – Warm Kale Salad with Dried Cranberries and Walnuts. This recipe is offered by a professional chef, author, recipe developer, educator and certified health coach at A Food Centric Life.

THE RECIPE

Warm Kale Salad with Dried Cranberries and Walnuts

1 large bunch of organic kale (Tuscan, Lacinato or Dinosaur)

a white salad plate with Warm Kale Salad with Dried Cranberries and Walnuts

Image Credit: A Food Centric Life

1 large shallot

2 teaspoons salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 large cloves of garlic, minced

Handful of dried cranberries

Small handful of chopped walnuts

1 tablespoon Balsamic vinegar (suggestion: infused balsamic fruit flavored variety like dark cherry)

Salt and pepper, to season

Bring a large pot (5 quart/liter) of water to a boil while you are trimming the kale leaves and slicing the shallot. Trim the ribs out of the center of the kale leaves, and then cut the leaves crosswise into ribbons. Slice the peeled shallot crosswise into thin rings.

When water boils, add 2 teaspoons salt, then drop the kale leaves into the water and cook for 2 minutes (called blanching). Drain well through a sieve and place kale on a clean kitchen towel. Alternatively you can steam your kale for 2-3 minutes, and then proceed with the recipe.

In a medium sauté or fry pan, heat the olive oil over medium low heat until warm. Add the shallot rings, then the garlic. Cook for 1-2 minutes, stirring until softened. Be careful not to let them burn. Add the cranberries, walnuts, and vinegar. Stir and cook for a minute, then add the cooked kale. Toss the kale ribbons to coat and warm, season up with salt and pepper, and then serve.

Make this a even more warm winter salad by either serving the warm salad as a side dish with roasted chicken, as Sally the author of “A Food Centric Life” explains, or as a foundation for roasted salmon. She also suggests placing the warm salad over a bed of quinoa for a vegetarian or vegan entree.

Sally says you can use a fruit flavored infused balsamic vinegar like dark cherry or fig when making the vinaigrette.

Another great warm winter salad you can enjoy is: Sweet Potato, Kale and Shrimp Skillet

2 tablespoons olive oil

salad plate with Sweet Potato, Kale and Shrimp Skillet½ cup onion, diced

Red pepper flakes, to taste

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 cups sweet potatoes, diced

2 cups fresh shrimp

3 cups trimmed and coarsely chopped kale leaves

Salt and black pepper to taste

Heat a a ceramic coated cast iron pan over medium heat, add olive oil.

Next add onions and red pepper flakes, and saute until onions are soft and browned.

Next add garlic and cook about 30 seconds more.

Next add sweet potato and cook until soft, about 10-15 minutes. If necessary add a 2 or 3 tablespoons of water to help cook the sweet potato.

Next add shrimp and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until they are pink in color.

Turn heat to low and add kale, stirring in until wilted.

Season to taste with salt and pepper (optional).

Plate and serve.

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Pork – That’s What’s For Breakfast Lunch And Dinner

Pork - That's What's For Breakfast Lunch And DinnerThe Washington Post wrote an article in October of 2014 about the Tudor Place that housed 6 generations from 1816 to 1983.

Tudor Place became one of the first 70 U.S. properties designated a “National Historic Landmark” in 1960, when the designation was created.

Tudor Place

Image Credit: City Profile

Tudor Place in Georgetown Heights (Washington D.C.) was built by Martha Washington’s granddaughter, Martha Curtis Peter and her husband.

Residents of Tudor Place had a small smoke-house that all 6 generations relied on to smoke their meats.

Can you guess what meat they smoked most often, and ate for breakfast, lunch, and dinner? If you guessed “Pork,” you guessed correctly.

When touring the residence, you are able to see displayed, a cookbook that served 6 generations providing the kitchen cooks with recipes that only included pork as the main ingredient.

The Washington Post wrote stating that communications officer for Tudor Place, Mandy Katz says that pork was on the dinning table 3 times a day.

Smokehouse at Tuder Place

Preservation Manager Jessica Zullinger and staff tour newly restored Smokehouse – Image Credit: tuderplace.org

The small smoke-house we made mention of was never on the tour of Tudor Place. But it was renovated and became part of the tour on the 23rd of October 2014.

The newly added structure to the Tudor Place tour was celebrated with, yes you guessed – pork. Little smokies and pulled pork sliders to be exact.

This year, 2016 is Tudor Place Bicentennial. You can read and learn more about Tudor Place by linking here: Tudor Place – America’s Story Lives Here.

Our featured recipes include pork, and they are…

  1. Smoked Bacon Golden Beets and Kale Hash
  2. Orange Ginger Pork Meatball Soup
  3. Stuffed And Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin Chops with Brown Sugar And Spice Glazed Carrots

Smoked Bacon Golden Beets and Kale HashSmoked Bacon Golden Beets and Kale Hash

2 strips of smoked bacon per serving, cut into 1-inch slices

1 medium golden beet, shredded

1/2 cup kale, remove leafy parts from steam, leaves torn bite size

Heat a frying pan over medium heat. Add bacon and cook until just done. Next add beets, stir in, and cook 1 minute more. Add kale and stir in just until wilted. Plate and serve.

Orange Ginger Pork Meatball Soup

1 lb. ground pork

2 green onions

Orange Ginger Pork Meatball Soup3 clove garlic, minced

1 piece (1-inch) peeled fresh ginger, finely chopped

4-5 teaspoons of orange zest

4 cups vegetable broth

8 oz. snow peas, cut into thirds at an angle

1 cup of cooked brown rice

1 cup cooked black beans

Arrange oven rack 6 inches from broiler heat source. Preheat broiler on high. Line large rimmed baking sheet with foil.

In a medium bowl, combine pork, green onions, garlic, ginger, orange zest, and 1/2 teaspoon each of Himalayan salt and fresh ground pepper (both optional). Form pork mixture into bite-size meatballs (about 1 inch each).  Arrange in a single layer on prepared baking sheet. Broil 5 to 7 minutes, or until browned.

Meanwhile, in covered 5-quart sauce pot, heat broth to simmering on high. Once the broth is simmering, add snow peas, rice, beans and cooked meatballs. Reduce heat to medium, and simmer 5 minutes, or until meatballs are cooked through and snow peas are tender.

Stuffed And Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin Chops With Brown Sugar And Spice Glazed Carrots

1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed

Stuffed and Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin Chops with Brown Sugar and Spice Glazed Carrots1 teaspoon dried thyme

3/4 teaspoon dried minced garlic

1/4 cup butter, milted

1/4 cup brown sugar, packed

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt (optional)

1/4 teaspoon black pepper (optional)

1 pound pork loin chops, thin cut

8 slices smoked bacon

8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature

1 pound carrots, sliced down the middle and cut into 2 inch slices

Heat oven to 400 degrees

Mix sugar and spices in a small bowl and set aside.

Spread some cream cheese on one side of chops. Sprinkle on some sugar-spice mix. Roll chops and wrap with one slice of bacon. Use a tooth pick or two to hold in place.

Arrange prepared chops into a 13 X 9 inch glass baking dish.

Next add melted butter to sugar-spice mix, and incorporate.  Add cut carrots to a 13 X 9 glass baking dish and mix in sugar-spice.

Roast both prepared baking dishes for 30 minutes, or until pork is cook.

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Leafy Green Salads With Homemade Cheese

Leafy Green Salads With Homemade CheeseThrowing some leafy greens with other vegetables together on a plate and topping it with some nuts, seeds and your favorite dressing or vinaigrette is a great way to get your daily servings of vegetables.

How about going a step further and adding some cheese, like Parmesan, grumbled goat cheese, or even some of your own homemade cheese made in an hour? What? Yes you read right, homemade cheese made in one hour.

One Hour Cheese by Claudia LuceroWe were listening to NPR this past week, and the program was All Things Considered, and I was very intrigued at hearing that you could make cheese in one hour.

Listen here to the 3 minute interview with Claudia Lucero who runs Urban Cheesecraft in Portland, Oregon, and authored the book “One Hour Cheese” (CLICK HERE TO HEAR INTERVIEW). 

After listening in the car to the interview with Claudia, the very next day with a gallon of milk from Whole Foods Market, I ventured to make some homemade cheese in my own kitchen for the first time.

Here’s what you need to do to make your own cheese in an hour….

Pour 4 cups milk into a 2-quart saucepan and heat it on medium as you stir.

Look for foam to begin forming around the inside edges of the pot as well as little simmer bubbles coming from the bottom—not a rolling boil. Stir continuously so that a skin doesn’t form on the milk’s surface.

Once you see a soft boiling of the milk, slowly add 1/8 cup of fresh lemon juice. You can also use vinegar. Apple cider or white vinegar will do.

As you are slowly pouring in the lemon juice, stir gently to incorporate it until you see the clear separation of curds, which will be white solids, and whey, a clear liquid.

This separation of curds from the whey is called coagulation.  When you see coagulation and the liquid no longer looks like plain milk, turn the heat to low and stir the curds very, very gently as you cook them for 2 minutes more after the coagulation begins.

Have a cheese cloth placed in a small strainer over a bowl, and using a slotted spoon, carefully spoon out the curds and place them into the cheese cloth, and let any excess whey drain off.

After the whey has drained off, you can add some sea salt or Himalayan salt to the cheese and mix in.

We add some garlic seasoning, which gave it a great flavor. In Claudia Lucero’s book, she even shows you how to make a faux cheddar cheese (which takes days to make) in an hour by just adding turmeric to give it that orange look that you see when purchased at the market.

Here is what we got at our first try making homemade cheese.

making homemade cheese

The cheese is much like a crumbled cheese you would buy at the market. Here are a few leafy green salads we put together using our homemade cheese.

Leafy Green Salad With Homemade Cheese

               Leafy Green Salad With Homemade Cheese

This salad is a few handfuls of leafy greens (your choice) topped with sliced radishes, pecan pieces, pomegranate vinaigrette, and homemade crumbled cheese.

making a leafy green salad with root vegetables and homemade cheese

Our next salad is a plate of leafy greens, with a fried egg and some root vegetables, consisting of sliced radishes and golden beets. We topped the salad with a olive oil and sweet balsamic vinaigrette, homemade crumbled cheese and fresh thyme.

Leafy Greens With Root Vegetables and A Fried Egg And Homemade Cheese

Leafy Greens With Root Vegetables and A Fried Egg And Homemade Cheese

As we mentioned at the on set of the article, this is a great way to get a few servings of your daily need of vegetables, and a added treat you make yourself, Homemade Cheese.

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National Maple Syrup Day

National Maple Syrup Day - Baked French Toast and Cream Cheese Casserole

Today December 17 is the perfect day to have pancakes or french toast topped off with some delicious, real maple syrup to celebrate National Maple Syrup Day.

Maple syrup is from the xylem sap of red maple or black maple trees.

Two French Toast recipes topped with Real Maple Syrup

In the spring, the maple trees are tapped by boring holes into the trunks of the trees, and the sap is collected in buckets.

After the sap is collected, it is processed by heating to evaporate much of the water, leaving only the concentrated syrup.

European settlers to the north american continent learned the process from the indigenous people, or native Americans. Up until the 1930’s the United States led the world in the production of maple syrup, but now Canada is collecting sap to produce maple syrupthe world’s largest maple syrup producer, were as Vermont is the largest producer of maple syrup in the United States.

If you didn’t know, a production farm turning sap into maple syrup is known as a sugar-bush, sugar-wood or sugar-shack.

Wow too much talk about maple syrup is making our mouths water, so let’s get to our featured recipe, which is a twist on french toast, French Toast Cream Cheese Casserole, and here is what you will need.

French Toast Cream Cheese Casserole

8 eggs

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 1/2 cups whole milk

2/3 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup maple syrup

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

National Maple Syrup Day - Baked French Toast and Cream Cheese Casserole1 stick or 1/2 cup salted butter, melted

1 loaf of real sourdough bread, cubed into bite-size pieces (optional to use a loaf of French bread)

8 ounces cream cheese, cubed into 1/2 inch pieces

1 tablespoon cinnamon

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

In a large mixing bowl, cream eggs and sugar, then add whole milk, cream, maple syrup, and vanilla. Mix together until well combined.

Next add the melted butter to the egg mixture and mix together thoroughly.

Butter a 9×13-inch glass baking dish. Sprinkle butter with coconut sugar or brown sugar for some added sweetness (optional). Next, spread half of the bread over the bottom of the dish then sprinkle half of the cream cheese chunks over the top. Add the rest of the bread then sprinkle with the remaining cream cheese.

Pour the egg mixture evenly over the top of the pan making sure to get the entire bread wet.

Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon cinnamon. You can use a mesh strainer to spread the cinnamon more evenly.

Cover the dish with foil.

Bake for 35 minutes then remove the foil from the pan and bake for another 10 minutes.

Let cool for a few minutes then serve with real maple syrup.

Check out our other French Toast recipes with real maple syrup…

French Toast Fruit Roll Ups

Breaded Coconut French Toast

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Teriyaki Chicken with Vegetables

Teriyaki Chicken with Vegetables

Chicken Teriyaki  is a very popular Japanese food in the US.  Teriyaki in Japanese means “grilled with shine.”  Sugar in teriyaki sauce gives a shine to the food, making it not only delicious, but also looks more appetizing.

It is very simple to make teriyaki sauce, as it is a mixture of only three ingredients, soy sauce, sugar, and sake. You can also use mirin for a sweeter teriyaki.  One of the advantages of making the sauce yourself is you can adjust the flavor the way you prefer.  Also making your own, avoids the unnecessary chemicals in store bought teriyaki sauce.

 common-japanese-cooking-ingredientsAccording to Japanese Cooking 101, this is a list of common ingredients used in Japanese cuisine:

Aburaage
Aonori
Dashi
Dried Bonito Flakes (Katsuobushi)
Dried Shiitake Mushroom
Mirin
Miso Paste
Nagaimo (Dioscorea opposita, Chinese yam)
Panko (Bread Crumbs)
Pickled Red Ginger (Benishouga)
Rice
Rice Vinegar
Roasted Seaweed (Sushi Nori)
Sake
Soy Sauce
Tonkatsu Sauce

It is not common in traditional Japanese cuisine to use garlic, though it is in Korean cooking.

Our featured recipe is a Teriyaki Chicken with Vegetables, though not an authentic recipe, but an American rendition.

homemade Teriyaki Sauce

Teriyaki Sauce

4 tablespoons tamari sauce  (works the same as soy sauce)

4 tablespoons mirin (can use sake for a less sweeter teriyaki sauce)

2 tablespoons coconut sugar (not used in Japanese cooking, can use white sugar if you wish)

2 teaspoons arrowroot (can also use cornstarch or potato starch)

2 tablespoons water

Mix together in a small sauce pan over medium heat, the first three ingredients. In a small cup mix together the water and arrowroot. Bring the pot to a slow boil and add the arrowroot-water mixture to the boiling pot. Stir in and continue to stir until the liquid thickens. Remove from heat and set aside.

Tamari is specifically a Japanese form of soy sauce, traditionally made as a by-product of miso paste. Tamari is a gluten-free product, were as soy sauce is not.

Now let’s prepare the meat and vegetables to mix with our homemade teriyaki sauce.

vegetables cut Julienne style4  tablespoons coconut oil (or sesame oil), divided

2 inch piece of fresh ginger, grated

3 green onions, chopped

2 carrots, cut julienne style

2 celery ribs, cut julienne style

8 asparagus spires, cut into 1 to 2 inch pieces

4 chicken breasts, skinless and bones, cut into 1 inch chunks

2-3 tablespoons sesame seeds

A traditional Japanese chicken teriyaki uses chicken thighs, and asparagus is not a vegetable normally used in Japanese cooking.

sauteing ginger and green onionsSaute the prepared ginger and green onions in the heated coconut oil (2 tablespoons) over medium heat in a large frying pan, until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Next add the carrots, celery, and asparagus, and continue to stir-fry until vegetables are just tender, about 10 minutes. Set aside.

cooking chicken thigh chunks in teriyaki sauceHeat a large frying pan over medium heat with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil, and add chopped meat and cook until meat is oblique. Next add the teriyaki sauce and mix in.

mixing in sesame seedsNext mix in the sesame seeds, and add the vegetables and mix in as well.

Teriyaki Chicken with VegetablesPlate and serve over white rice.

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Roasted Chicken With Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze 

Roasted Chicken With Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze The Scovilla scale is the measurement of how hot or spicy a chilli pepper is. The scale was first used in 1912 and named after its inventor Wilbur Scovilla.

According to the scale chipotles are between 3,000 to 10,000 SHU (Scovilla heat units), and that means a hot chili.

The word chipotle is derived from chilpoctli an Aztec word, and is a smoked red dried jalapeño chili from Mexico.

The chili is used in Mexican prepared foods as well as Mexican-American, Tex-Mex, and prepared dishes of the southwestern parts of the US, like New Mexico (Link Here for more information about Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What Is The Difference?).

Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze Our featured recipe is an inspiration as it uses the chili to glaze the chicken. We found the recipe in Novembers issue (2014) of “Good Housekeeping.” The glaze is prepared to use while roasting a turkey.

We thought why not test it on some chicken breasts and see if our palate could endure the spice while eating the roasted poultry, and if so, it would be used to roast a turkey.

Our featured recipe is Baked Chicken With Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze, and here is what you will need.

Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze

1 teaspoon chipotle in adobe
Juice from 1/2 an orange
1 1/2 teaspoon raw honey
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
1 to 2 garlic cloves
2 teaspoons orange zest
1/2 teaspoon powdered cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt

Blend together in a blender until smooth.

This recipe was reduced down to accommodate four (4) chicken breasts. For the full recipe to roast a turkey link here: Good Housekeeping.

Now let’s glaze some chicken with that Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze.

preparing chicken breastsUsing a fork or knife, poke holes all over each chicken breast. You can use breast’s with the skin on, but as you can see we have some with the skin removed.

raw chicken breast wih Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze Next, spoon on some sauce or glaze and spread out over the meat. Set aside for about 30 to 40 minutes and allow the flavor of the spices to absorb in.

putting chicken breasts with Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze in oven to roastPlace chicken into a 350 degree preheated oven for for 40 minutes or until internal chicken temperature is 165 degrees.

Roasted Chicken With Chipotle Cinnamon Orange Glaze on a platterPlace the roasted chicken breasts on a platter and serve with an appropriate side dish. Link Here for some suggestions.

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Explore the Web Through a Virtual Tour

Explore the Web Through a Virtual Tour

Were you aware of a company called Nude Food? Will, it is a place that sells gluten free, dairy free, and soy free energy bars. Without all those vital Nude foodnecessities for making food, the gluten and dairy that is, what is left? Nutrient dense, raw, organic food.

They even make the claim that it is kosher food. In other words it is in is natural form, never been mixed with something other than what is natural. Much like extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil.

Naked JuiceDid you know there is a juice that has been named Naked Juice?

Yes, and the juice is close to being fresh.

Oh wait, before you slap my face, I don’t mean the juice is fresh like overly bold or impertinent with you, I mean like freshly juiced fruit and vegetables.

Since we have used the word’s nude and naked, does that make you overly uncomfortable? Of course there usually is, or we should say always is one thing that will come to mind with the words nude and naked.

A person who is wearing no close at all. But has this ever come to mind with the word naked, “naked, unprovoked aggression.”

The following are definitions for the word “naked” according to the Free on-line Dictionary:

1. Having no clothing on the body; nude.

2. Having no covering, especially the usual one: a naked sword.

3. Devoid of vegetation, trees, or foliage: the naked ground; naked tree limbs.

4. Being without addition, concealment, disguise, or embellishment: the naked facts; naked ambition.

5. Devoid of a specified quality, characteristic, or element: a look that was naked of all pretense.

6. Exposed to harm; vulnerable: “naked to mine enemies” (Shakespeare).

7. Botany

a. Not enclosed in an ovary: naked seeds.

b. Unprotected by scales: naked buds.

c. Lacking a perianth: naked flowers.

d. Without leaves or pubescence: naked stalks.

8. Zoology Lacking outer covering such as scales, fur, feathers, or a shell.

Even Websters dictionary will start with saying, “the medical definition” of Naked or Nude. I guess they do that to put the reader at ease, having a conversation with those two words, seems to make people uneasy or uncomfortable.

Were you aware that there are many nudist parks throughout the USA? Yes there are, in Utah, Idaho, California, Florida, just to name a few states.

Even some popular food sights will refer to there food photography as food porn, which again the word porn always brings to mind, nudity.

What is the purpose of our article? Will I want to put you at ease, because our blog was mentioned in an article on February. 5, 2015 at A Guy Without Boxers. Roger, the author of the site, is a same gender loving man. He is a professed nudist, and he writes and posts the nonsexual perspective of nudism. Roger is a professor at a local Washington D.C University.

About a year ago, Roger made a comment on one of our posts and then followed our blog. He stated he doesn’t like to cook, but he always passes on some of our recipes to his partner, who is the cook. Roger even had our posted dessert Blueberry Lemon Flognarde for a few of his Sunday Brunches, as well as made it for his parents on his visit to Greece last Fall (2014). He stated his father’s likes were traditional when it comes to food, but his father was very impressed with the dessert.

We were nominated by Roger with the Virtual Blog Tour Award, and he encouraged the nominated blogs to respond and post by Monday, March 2, 2015. But as you can see, I am days late to posting my acceptance of the Virtual Blog Tour Award, and it isn’t on a Monday.

The rules are as follows:

  • Answer four questions about your creative process which lets other bloggers and visitors know what inspires you to do what you do.
  • Write a one-time article which is to be posted on a Monday (the date supplied by your nominator).  This article can be in the same post in which you answered the four questions.
  • Pass the tour on to up to four other bloggers. Give them the rules and a specific Monday to post.

I nominate the following blogs for the Virtual Blog Tour Award…Don’t feel you have to do anything, only join in if you want to! The date to respond is the 13th of April  2015…

I nominate the following:

Parent Rap – I enjoy Jackie’s blog because she writes about parenting advise that really works. She belongs to the local chapter Parents Anonymous® of New Jersey, Inc. She has been supporting other parents in need foe over 20 years now.

Jovina Cooks Italian –  She writes awesome articles about Italy and the cuisine. She stated she use to write for food magazines.

The Militant Negro He write about Politics, Food, Thoughts and Opinions of Facts and Truth as will as Art and Poetry.

Get Everyone Cooking  This blog owner is new to the blogs-fer. His name is Wayne and he believes everyone should get back to health by cooking great homemade food.

Virtual Blog Tour AwardNow as to the four questions. I wasn’t provide with any questions, but all I can say is I, the owner of this website (Splendid Recipes and More) loves cooking.

Cooking at home with fresh food, less canola oil, and using more coconut olive, and avocado oils, has helped to improve my health, among other things.

Cooking is a stress reliever for me, I love cooking for others. Gardening is another love of mine, and I grow my own food as well (a few season’s I was not able). I also enjoy writing about nutrition (Health News Library).

 

 

 

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National Popcorn Day 2015

National Popcorn Day 2015The Washington Post say, “The powers that pop have decreed that Monday is National Popcorn Day. Though the origins of the “holiday” are unclear…”

Popcorn also called by popping corn, is a type of corn that expands from the kernel and puffs up or pops when heated. The kernel can pop because it has a hard moisture-sealed hull and a dense starchy interior. As it is heated, pressure builds up within the kernel, and a small explosion is the result. Some varieties of corn are now cultivated specifically as popping corns, and we say Ya!! The more popcorn, the more we can eat on this day National Popcorn Day.

During the Great Depression, popcorn was really cheap at about 5 cents a bag. While other businesses failed during the Depression, the popcorn business thrived and became a source of income for many struggling farmers. During World War II, candy production went down because of sugar rations, and Americans compensated by eating three times as much popcorn as they had before.

national-popcorn-day-2015-popcorn-served-at-the-movies-since-1912Popcorn is a popular snack food at sporting events and in cinemas, where it has been served since 1912 (USA).

Depending on how popcorn is prepared or cooked, it can be considered a health food. Make sure though, if possible to use non GMO popcorn. You can find some non GMO popcorn here on-line at Tropical Traditions.

Bob’s Red Mill (a national famous organic food brand) also offers packaged organic non GMO popcorn.

Our favorite popcorn is Caramel Popcorn. We found this recipe that goes a bit further and adds apples. We found this recipe at Cookies and Cups .

Caramel Apple Popcorn

Makes about 14 cups caramel corn

Caramel Apple Popcorn

Photo Credit: Cookies and Cups

1 cup unpopped corn kernels

2 (2.5 oz) bags of apple chips

1 cup light brown sugar

1 cup light corn syrup

½ cup butter

1 tsp salt

1 (14 oz ) can of sweetened condensed milk

Preheat oven to 250°

In an air popper, pop your kernels into a large bowl. Pick out any unpopped kernels.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine brown sugar, butter, corn syrup and salt. Heat until melted and begins to boil. Once boiling, pour in your can of sweetened condensed milk and stir continuously for 5 minutes, to prevent burning.

Remove from heat and pour directly over popcorn and apples, stirring until coated evenly.

Place in preheated oven and bake for 45-50 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes to cook evenly.

Remove from oven, break into pieces and allow to cool.

Notes from Cookies and Cups:

Store in an airtight container for about a week.

You don’t have to bake this caramel corn if you prefer it softer and chewier. But if you don’t bake it, it will remain fairly sticky.

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Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread Pudding

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread PuddingOur featured dessert is original prepared only with blueberries. But we were given Bosc pears, and they are very good eating. We decided to use them as an addition to the bread pudding. The Bosc is a cultivar of the European Pear grown in the northwestern U.S. states of California, Washington, and Oregon. It is also cultivated in Australia, as well as in British Columbia, and of course Europe. In Europe it is sometimes referred to a the Kaiser pear.

The featured recipe was prepared in video format, please enjoy. The recipe follows at the end, and you can also copy it were it is posted below the video.

Information on different varieties of Pears: Local Foods – Pear Varieties

 

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread Pudding

3 eggs

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread Pudding4 cups heavy whipping cream

1 cup sugar

1 tsp. salt*

3 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups blueberries (fresh or frozen)

1/2 cup Bosc pears, 2 medium, diced

1 (10 -12 ounce) package white chocolate chips

1 loaf French bread, cut into 1-inch cubes

 

Preheat oven 350°

In a large mixing bowl; combine eggs, cream, sugar and vanilla. Stir in blueberries, pears and baking chips.

Mix in bread cubes; let stand for 15 minutes or until bread is softened. Transfer to a greased 13×9 inch baking dish.

Bake, uncovered, for 50-65 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Let stand for 20 minutes before serving.

*With the presence of sugar in a recipe, using salt can require less sugar. The original recipe calls for 2 cups sugar but no salt. By adding the salt, less sugar is needed. The salt brings out the sweetness of the sugar, and making it seem as though you put two cups.

 

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