Explore the Web Through a Virtual Tour

Explore the Web Through a Virtual Tour

Were you aware of a company called Nude Food? Will, it is a place that sells gluten free, dairy free, and soy free energy bars. Without all those vital Nude foodnecessities for making food, the gluten and dairy that is, what is left? Nutrient dense, raw, organic food.

They even make the claim that it is kosher food. In other words it is in is natural form, never been mixed with something other than what is natural. Much like extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil.

Naked JuiceDid you know there is a juice that has been named Naked Juice?

Yes, and the juice is close to being fresh.

Oh wait, before you slap my face, I don’t mean the juice is fresh like overly bold or impertinent with you, I mean like freshly juiced fruit and vegetables.

Since we have used the word’s nude and naked, does that make you overly uncomfortable? Of course there usually is, or we should say always is one thing that will come to mind with the words nude and naked.

A person who is wearing no close at all. But has this ever come to mind with the word naked, “naked, unprovoked aggression.”

The following are definitions for the word “naked” according to the Free on-line Dictionary:

1. Having no clothing on the body; nude.

2. Having no covering, especially the usual one: a naked sword.

3. Devoid of vegetation, trees, or foliage: the naked ground; naked tree limbs.

4. Being without addition, concealment, disguise, or embellishment: the naked facts; naked ambition.

5. Devoid of a specified quality, characteristic, or element: a look that was naked of all pretense.

6. Exposed to harm; vulnerable: “naked to mine enemies” (Shakespeare).

7. Botany

a. Not enclosed in an ovary: naked seeds.

b. Unprotected by scales: naked buds.

c. Lacking a perianth: naked flowers.

d. Without leaves or pubescence: naked stalks.

8. Zoology Lacking outer covering such as scales, fur, feathers, or a shell.

Even Websters dictionary will start with saying, “the medical definition” of Naked or Nude. I guess they do that to put the reader at ease, having a conversation with those two words, seems to make people uneasy or uncomfortable.

Were you aware that there are many nudist parks throughout the USA? Yes there are, in Utah, Idaho, California, Florida, just to name a few states.

Even some popular food sights will refer to there food photography as food porn, which again the word porn always brings to mind, nudity.

What is the purpose of our article? Will I want to put you at ease, because our blog was mentioned in an article on February. 5, 2015 at A Guy Without Boxers. Roger, the author of the site, is a same gender loving man. He is a professed nudist, and he writes and posts the nonsexual perspective of nudism. Roger is a professor at a local Washington D.C University.

About a year ago, Roger made a comment on one of our posts and then followed our blog. He stated he doesn’t like to cook, but he always passes on some of our recipes to his partner, who is the cook. Roger even had our posted dessert Blueberry Lemon Flognarde for a few of his Sunday Brunches, as well as made it for his parents on his visit to Greece last Fall (2014). He stated his father’s likes were traditional when it comes to food, but his father was very impressed with the dessert.

We were nominated by Roger with the Virtual Blog Tour Award, and he encouraged the nominated blogs to respond and post by Monday, March 2, 2015. But as you can see, I am days late to posting my acceptance of the Virtual Blog Tour Award, and it isn’t on a Monday.

The rules are as follows:

  • Answer four questions about your creative process which lets other bloggers and visitors know what inspires you to do what you do.
  • Write a one-time article which is to be posted on a Monday (the date supplied by your nominator).  This article can be in the same post in which you answered the four questions.
  • Pass the tour on to up to four other bloggers. Give them the rules and a specific Monday to post.

I nominate the following blogs for the Virtual Blog Tour Award…Don’t feel you have to do anything, only join in if you want to! The date to respond is the 13th of April  2015…

I nominate the following:

Parent Rap – I enjoy Jackie’s blog because she writes about parenting advise that really works. She belongs to the local chapter Parents Anonymous® of New Jersey, Inc. She has been supporting other parents in need foe over 20 years now.

Jovina Cooks Italian –  She writes awesome articles about Italy and the cuisine. She stated she use to write for food magazines.

The Militant Negro He write about Politics, Food, Thoughts and Opinions of Facts and Truth as will as Art and Poetry.

Get Everyone Cooking  This blog owner is new to the blogs-fer. His name is Wayne and he believes everyone should get back to health by cooking great homemade food.

Virtual Blog Tour AwardNow as to the four questions. I wasn’t provide with any questions, but all I can say is I, the owner of this website (Splendid Recipes and More) loves cooking.

Cooking at home with fresh food, less canola oil, and using more coconut olive, and avocado oils, has helped to improve my health, among other things.

Cooking is a stress reliever for me, I love cooking for others. Gardening is another love of mine, and I grow my own food as well (a few season’s I was not able). I also enjoy writing about nutrition (Health News Library).

 

 

 

What Others Are Reading:

National Popcorn Day 2015

National Popcorn Day 2015The Washington Post say, “The powers that pop have decreed that Monday is National Popcorn Day. Though the origins of the “holiday” are unclear…”

Popcorn also called by popping corn, is a type of corn that expands from the kernel and puffs up or pops when heated. The kernel can pop because it has a hard moisture-sealed hull and a dense starchy interior. As it is heated, pressure builds up within the kernel, and a small explosion is the result. Some varieties of corn are now cultivated specifically as popping corns, and we say Ya!! The more popcorn, the more we can eat on this day National Popcorn Day.

During the Great Depression, popcorn was really cheap at about 5 cents a bag. While other businesses failed during the Depression, the popcorn business thrived and became a source of income for many struggling farmers. During World War II, candy production went down because of sugar rations, and Americans compensated by eating three times as much popcorn as they had before.

national-popcorn-day-2015-popcorn-served-at-the-movies-since-1912Popcorn is a popular snack food at sporting events and in cinemas, where it has been served since 1912 (USA).

Depending on how popcorn is prepared or cooked, it can be considered a health food. Make sure though, if possible to use non GMO popcorn. You can find some non GMO popcorn here on-line at Tropical Traditions.

Bob’s Red Mill (a national famous organic food brand) also offers packaged organic non GMO popcorn.

Our favorite popcorn is Caramel Popcorn. We found this recipe that goes a bit further and adds apples. We found this recipe at Cookies and Cups .

Caramel Apple Popcorn

Makes about 14 cups caramel corn

Caramel Apple Popcorn

Photo Credit: Cookies and Cups

1 cup unpopped corn kernels

2 (2.5 oz) bags of apple chips

1 cup light brown sugar

1 cup light corn syrup

½ cup butter

1 tsp salt

1 (14 oz ) can of sweetened condensed milk

Preheat oven to 250°

In an air popper, pop your kernels into a large bowl. Pick out any unpopped kernels.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine brown sugar, butter, corn syrup and salt. Heat until melted and begins to boil. Once boiling, pour in your can of sweetened condensed milk and stir continuously for 5 minutes, to prevent burning.

Remove from heat and pour directly over popcorn and apples, stirring until coated evenly.

Place in preheated oven and bake for 45-50 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes to cook evenly.

Remove from oven, break into pieces and allow to cool.

Notes from Cookies and Cups:

Store in an airtight container for about a week.

You don’t have to bake this caramel corn if you prefer it softer and chewier. But if you don’t bake it, it will remain fairly sticky.

What Others Are Reading:

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread Pudding

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread PuddingOur featured dessert is original prepared only with blueberries. But we were given Bosc pears, and they are very good eating. We decided to use them as an addition to the bread pudding. The Bosc is a cultivar of the European Pear grown in the northwestern U.S. states of California, Washington, and Oregon. It is also cultivated in Australia, as well as in British Columbia, and of course Europe. In Europe it is sometimes referred to a the Kaiser pear.

The featured recipe was prepared in video format, please enjoy. The recipe follows at the end, and you can also copy it were it is posted below the video.

Information on different varieties of Pears: Local Foods – Pear Varieties

 

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread Pudding

3 eggs

Blueberry Pear and White Chocolate Bread Pudding4 cups heavy whipping cream

1 cup sugar

1 tsp. salt*

3 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups blueberries (fresh or frozen)

1/2 cup Bosc pears, 2 medium, diced

1 (10 -12 ounce) package white chocolate chips

1 loaf French bread, cut into 1-inch cubes

 

Preheat oven 350°

In a large mixing bowl; combine eggs, cream, sugar and vanilla. Stir in blueberries, pears and baking chips.

Mix in bread cubes; let stand for 15 minutes or until bread is softened. Transfer to a greased 13×9 inch baking dish.

Bake, uncovered, for 50-65 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Let stand for 20 minutes before serving.

*With the presence of sugar in a recipe, using salt can require less sugar. The original recipe calls for 2 cups sugar but no salt. By adding the salt, less sugar is needed. The salt brings out the sweetness of the sugar, and making it seem as though you put two cups.

 

What Others are saying About Bread Puddings:

Choosing the Right Honeydew Melon

Choosing the Right Honeydew Melon

Honeydew is another summer favorite fruit. If you missed the prior articles about the watermelon and cantaloupe you can read about them here: Articles on Melons.

It’s so disappointing when you get a melon that just doesn’t taste good. It may not be sweet enough or not ripe enough. It just makes the whole melon eating experience a let-down. That’s why we’re going to ask Mark a vendor at our local Farmer’s Market to show us how to pick out just the right honeydew melon so you can get the most flavorful, enjoyable melon possible.

Squeeze the ends of the honeydew melon. You want them to have a little bit of a give to it, as that means it’s ripe.

Look at the color of the outside of the honeydew melon, the more yellow it is, the better. Look for a golden hue to it.

The skin will have almost a sticky texture when it’s at its ripest.

Brown spots on the rind of a honeydew melon are kind of like brown spots on a banana. That’s where the fruit is the sweetest. So don’t shy away from a few brown spots.

Pay attention to the shape of your honeydew melon. You want it to be spherical in shape for the tastiest melon.

Weight matters, too. Because melons consist of mostly water, you want one that is heavier than it appears. This will be the juiciest melon.

Use all of your senses when checking your honeydew melon. Give it a smell. If it has a nice, pleasant aroma, then it’s going to taste good too.

Mark grabbed a honeydew melon up to his ear and started shaking it side to side. He said, “If you can hear the seeds rolling around in there, then it’s ripe.” I tried it, but couldn’t hear the seeds. He said that one takes practice.

Tapping on the melon with your knuckle and hearing a hollow sound, means the melon is ripe.

I asked Mark about honeydews that are orange inside?

orange flesh honeydew

An organic orange flesh honeydew…Picture credit: http://www.burpee.com

Mark said, “If you find honeydew with orange-flesh, that’s okay. This is a new kind of honeydew which is easier to tell if it’s ripe, the more orange it is, the better. However, be warned – it might not have as sweet of a taste as your typical honeydew melon.”

Make also said that if f a honeydew melon is picked too soon, that is, before it turns yellow, it will never ripen. He also said it’s best to avoid buying melons past August, because you probably aren’t going to get a very tasty melon unless you live in California where they are grown.

Mark pointed out that the most important thing when choosing just the right honeydew melon is to pay attention to the color of the rind. A honeydew melon starts out green. If it remains green or even has a greenish hue to it, then it’s not at all ready yet. Watch out for green spots too. This means it’s not ripe yet either. And it’s not going to get that way with time like bananas will. Honeydews don’t keep ripening after their picked.

Honeydew melon is really a melon you have to buy to eat right away. It doesn’t get better if you buy it early and let it sit in the sun. You also want to store it at room temperature.  However, after it has been cut into you will need to store it in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. This will help keep it fresh for up to two weeks.

Now go out and pick your perfect honeydew melon and then enjoy all of its sweet, watery goodness. You’ll never pick a disappointing melon again, thanks to the tips Mark shared with us on how to choose the best honeydew melon.

 

Header image credit: Epicurus

 

What Others are saying about Honeydew:

Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?

Mexican vs. Tex-Mex: What is the Difference?

 

Today we have a guest blog speaker who is a native Mexican who will speak to us on the Tastes of Mexico.  Our guest speaker is Norma and the owner of Splendid Recipes and More (SRandM) is interviewing her.

SRandM: So how are you Norma?

Norma: Fine thank you. I just want to say I am excited to be a guest on Splendid Recipes and More. You have a lot of great recipes posted here on your blog. I had seen a few Mexican dishes as well.

SRandM: Will thank you Norma and I am glad you could speak with us. So Norma were in Mexico are you from?

playas de RosaritoNorma: I was born in the Mexican state of Baja California North, in a small beach town called Palayas de  Rosirito.

SRandM: Exactly where is Rosarito?

Norma: Across the border from San Diego, California. When you cross the border you come into Tijuana first, and Rosarito is about 20 minutes from Tijuana going south.

SRandM: So you told me you immigrated to the U.S. in 1992 and have been an American citizen since 2004?

Norma: Yes that is correct.

SRandM: What do you think about the Mexican food that is made here in the States?

Norma: For the most part it is authentic. But many Americans for their love of the Mexican food have made their own recipes using the ingredients we use in Mexico, and call it a Mexican dish. Such as New Mexico, they make enchiladas as we do in Mexico, but they use flour tortillas, and the Mexicans use corn tortillas. Some people have even made enchiladas, casserole style calling it an Enchilada pie, which is not authentic Mexican.

SRandM: Yes I understand. What do you think about the variations in Texas? Is Mexican food and Tex-Mex the same?

Before Norma answers our question, have you ever wondered what the difference is between authentic Mexican and Tex-Mex food? If you look around online, you’ll find plenty of debate over which style of theorizing cooking is better. Some “traditionalists” even question if Tex-Mex is a legitimate form of American cuisine.

No matter where the debate leads, Tex-Mex has earned its place on the American table. Still, that doesn’t answer how Tex-Mex differs from authentic Mexican food.  So let’s allow Norma to answer that.

Norma: Will here’s a little history. The roots of Tex-Mex cuisine trace back to the Spanish. The Spanish missionaries brought their recipes to Texas, and when they left the area in the 1700s, the natives of the region had already assimilated portions of their cooking culture into their own.

chili con carneAlong with this influence, early colonization of Texas also included other cultures. For example, individuals from the Canary Islands brought a different flavor palate with them, which included cumin, garlic, and chili powder. These flavors now form the foundation for the Tex-Mex favorite, chili con carne.

SRandM: So chili con carne is not an authentic Mexican dish?

Norma: No, chili or ground meat with beans and the use of spicy peppers are a Western frontier dish.

This blending of outside cultures with Mexican farm food and Texas ranch food is evident in many other modern Tex-Mex dishes.

One example that comes to mind is the use of beef. You will find a lot more beef in Tex-Mex recipes than in traditional Mexican dishes. Even though beef cattle could be found in Mexico, grasslands were overgrazed and herds were scarce.

SRandM: What types of meat are most popular then, in authentic Mexican cooking?

Norma: Pork, turkeys, wild fowl, chicken, and seafood were more available to the average Mexican household, and as a result, these ingredients were used and are used today in Mexican dishes, with the exception of turkey. You won’t find that at all in any Mexican dish.

SRandM: I guess since beef cattle have long been a staple in Texas, it would make sense that beef plays a more pre-dominate role in Tex-Mex recipes.

Norma: That is correct.

SRandMore: What other foods are used in authentic Mexican dishes?

Norma: Will before trade and commerce exploded in Mexico, beans, corn, and rice formed the basis for many meals. As Mexican people moved north, these foods found their way onto the plates of many households in Texas.

In return, Texans introduced Mexican cooks to more plentiful milk and cheese, in addition to beef. This blending of cultures and cuisine created excitement, especially during the 1940s and 1950s as the borders between the two countries became more open.

 Los Pesos Tex MexSRandM: So could it be correct to say it was around that time when the term ‘Tex-Mex’ was coined?

Norma: Yes, and was proudly used to describe Mexican dishes adapted by Texan cooks. But I will say as the years passed, the recipes lost much of their heritage.

SRandM: How so?

Norma: Will by the 1970s, many Tex-Mex dishes were almost completely revamped into unrecognizable concoctions that are not authentic Mexican dishes.

SRandMore: Such as?

Norma: Will, like Chimichangas, cheese nachos, just to name a few is Tex-Mex cuisine inventions.

Much of what we know as Tex-Mex today can be traced in part to the fast food franchise explosion which introduced “Mexican” food to most Americans.

The menus you typically see featured in these restaurants have pre-made taco shells which house a variety of ingredients buried under piles of cheese and sauces.  Though these restaurants will give a general nod to a “south of the border” flavor, their menus really have little in common with authentic Mexican food.

Another fact I find funny, is restaurants that have popped up all over America make the claim to serve only “authentic” Mexican food, when they are actually making a stab at Tex-Mex.

SRandM: So do you feel Tex-Mex has stolen the spot light from the real thing?

Norma: Will when it comes down to deciding which is best – authentic Mexican or Tex-Mex cuisine – I really can’t find a right or wrong answer to your question.

All you can do is compare and decide for yourself which you prefer. There are many cookbooks available for both Tex-Mex and Mexican cuisines to see what appeals to you. You can also visit authentic local restaurants to try for yourself.


NachosSRandM:
Will that is all the time we have today Norma. Tell our readers what recipes you will be presenting in the next post?

Norma: I thought I would prepare some authentic Guacamole and Real Mexican salsa, a couple of great condiments that pair well with lots of Mexican dishes.

SRandM: We look for to that Norma. So to our readers, return here to Splendid Recipes and More for some authentic recipes that will be prepared by Norma, which is: Homemade Guacamole and Fresh Mexican Salsa.

Link to: Homemade Guacamole and Fresh Mexican Salsa

Image credits:

Chili con carne    

Palayas de Rosarito

Los Pesos Tex-Mex

Clip art of Nachos and Taco

What Others are Saying About Mexican and Tex-Mex food:

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Mango Coconut Rice Pudding

Mango Coconut Rice PuddingMango season in the Northern hemisphere is April to October. One does not need special skills to eat the ripe fruit. Simply peel the fruit and bite into its juicy flesh.

Many love to eat the raw skin of the fruit as well. Myself personally, I have never tried to eat the peel. Now days you can find the mango dried, or frozen. In both cases the mango is still sweet in flavor. You can juice the mango, which I have with fresh blueberries, what a yummy smoothie.

Mexico's Tasty MangoesYou can make mango salsa and even in India they make Mango Jam. Mangoes do not grow in mild to cooler climates, they are grown in tropical regions of the earth. In 2012 the consumption of mangoes by Americans was up 30% over the prior 5  years.

If you are familiar with NPR or National Public Radio (USA), they had a report the morning of April. 9, 2013 entitled “Demand Is High For Mexico‘s Magnificent Mangoes”.

Take a moment to listen. Just Click Here to listen to the 1 1/2 minute NPR Report – another window will open to here report.

Our featured recipe:

Mango Coconut Rice Pudding

1 – 14 ounce can coconut milk
¼ cup Arborio rice
1/8 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. sugar
1/6 tsp. nutmeg, ground
1/6 tsp. cinnamon, ground
¼ cup mango (pureed)
some macadamia nuts (chopped, optional)

Place the coconut milk, rice, salt, sugar and cardamom in a sauce pan and bring to a boil.

Reduce the heat and simmer for 25-35 minutes stirring occasionally.

Remove from heat and let cool. Mix in the mango and garnish with chopped macadamia nuts.

What Others are Saying About Mangoes:

Image credit: Closet Cooking

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