Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Mozzarella sticks ate a go to appetizer. Their a finger-food that everyone at the table scrambles to snatch up while the cheese is still hot and extra pull-able or gooey.

Their also a big hit as a happy hour snack.

They’re served on party platters, for lunch and at brunch.

Party platter with mozzarella  cheese sticks

Mozzarella sticks are no cheesy joke, just gooey and delicious.

Deep-fried cheese has been said to originate in Paris, France in the 15th century.

However, recipes for breaded cheese sticks can be traced back to 1393. The original recipe called for the use of Muenster cheese instead of Mozzarella.

According to Vision Launch (who writes about the history of cheese) traditional Mozzarella was made using milk from the Water Buffalo.

What Is Panko

With a unique name, panko is simply a type of breadcrumb.

Panko is a Japanese culinary invention. The word panko in Japanese is “pan” meaning bread and “ko” meaning flour.

Herb Panko breadcrumbs

Authentic panko is baked using a pan connected to an electrical current. The finished product has no crust.

The reason the bread is baked this way is not well documented.

But Upper Crust Enterprises, a company that makes authentic panko in LosAngeles (USA), claims this method started during WWII, when Japanese soldiers fighting the Russians needed to bake bread.

With no oven for baking, they reportedly used electric current to cook bread, creating a product still made today.

If you’re looking for a crisp, crunchy texture when you bake or fry something breaded or with bread crumbs, panko is the way to go.

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Mozzarella cheese sticks are a irresistible combination of gooey melted cheese and crisp, golden breading.

  • 1 pound fresh mozzarella, patted dry and cut into sticks or individually wrapped cheese sticks
  • 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup herb Panko breadcrumbs
  • Avocado oil or other neutral-flavored oil, for frying
  • Marinara, warmed, for serving or optional to serve with Tzatziki Sauce

Cut mozzarella lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick slices, then cut again into 4-by-1/2-inch sticks.

Place flour in a shallow dish and season with salt and pepper.

Whisk eggs in a separate dish and season with salt and pepper.

Place mozzarella sticks in flour and coat, tapping off excess flour.

Next dip into eggs batter allowing excess to drip off, and coat with breadcrumbs, patting to adhere.

Transfer mozzarella sticks to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Freeze until firm, at least 1 hour. (Mozzarella sticks can be covered and frozen at this point up to 2 months.)

Breaded mozzarella cheese sticks  on parchment paper

Pour enough oil into a heavy pot (preferably cast iron) to come 2 inches up sides. Heat over medium-high until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350 degrees.

Working in batches, add mozzarella sticks; cook, turning occasionally, until golden and crisp, 2 to 3 minutes (adjust heat as necessary to maintain oil temperature.)

Transfer to a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet to drain.

Plate and serve with marinara sauce or optional to serve with tzatziki sauce.

Beat the Summer Heat with Crock Pot Cooking

Beat the Summer Heat with Crock Pot Cooking

As the weather outside warms up, the kitchen can be a terrible place to be. There are many things you can do however, when it comes to cooking a nice homemade meal that doesn’t require traditional stove top or oven cooking.

Learn to utilize some of the lesser heat producing equipment in your kitchen, such as the crock pot, in order to truly beat the summer heat and keep your cool while preparing a nice hot meal for friends and family.

How does crock pot cooking really help beat the heat? Simply put, the crock pot in and of itself puts off far less heat when cooking than an oven or stove top. This is the first and possibly the best reason to utilize the crock pot in your summer meal planning.

You should also consider the fact that using a crock pot to cook with will not heat the house and therefore preventing your air conditioning (or other cooling methods) from working overtime in order to compensate for the additional heat that other cooking methods introduce.

This makes crock pot cooking a win-win situation as the costs involved in operating a crock pot are far less than the costs involved in operating a stove or oven in general. Whether electric or gas, your stove and oven are often serious energy hogs. Add to that the fact that you are not raising the temperature in your home by traditional means of cooking and you are using even less electricity.

Unfortunately, the general consensus has been that crock pots are meant for comfort foods and hearty winter meals. The truth is that the crock pot should be one of your best loved and most often utilized cooking methods if you can manage it.

When it comes to cooking with a crock pot, the options are almost limitless. Almost anything that can be baked can be made in the crock pot. That includes many wonderful, enticing meals and treats.

Benefits of Crock Pot Cooking

In addition to the cost benefits mentioned above when it comes to crock pot cooking there are many other benefits that are well worth mentioning.

First of all, the bulk of the work involved in crock pot cooking takes place early in the day when you are refreshed rather than at the end of a hectic work or play day. This means that you are less likely to forget an ingredient or make other mistakes that often occur as we hurry to prepare a dinner when we are exhausted from the activities of our day.

Second, many great crock pot recipes include the vegetables that insure we are getting the nutrients we need. So often, when preparing a meal at the last minute, we may open a can of vegetables (in most cases canned vegetables have little to no nutritional value) in favor of expedience. Crock pot cooking in many instances is a meal in one dish.

Another great reason to use a crock pot for your summertime cooking is the ease of clean up. Unlike pots and pans, most crock pot meals are made in one dish. This means that there will not be mountains of dishes to be either hand washed or loaded into the dishwasher afterwards.

You can spend less time cleaning just as you spent less time slaving over a hot stove. Once cleanup is complete you can get back to enjoying the sun set, chasing the lightening bugs with your little ones, or waiting for the first star.

While there will never be a one size fits all best cooking method, crock pot cooking comes very close. If you have a crock pot collecting dust somewhere in the back of your pantry it is time to get it out, dust if off, and dig up some great summertime crock pot cooking recipes.

Here’s a great article we posted on the safety of crock pot cooking: Slow Cooking, Is it Safe?

 

Header Image credit: Restore Community Center

 

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