Fermented Beet and Fresh Pear Salad with Goat Cheese

Fermented Beet and Fresh Pear Salad with Goat Cheese

Pickled or fermented beets are a good source of complex carbohydrates, as one cup of fermented beets has 37 grams. Fermented beets are also a good source of dietary fiber. One cup of sliced pickled beets provides 6 grams of the 23-30 grams of needed fiber daily. Dietary fiber offers a number of health benefits, which includes promoting a healthy digestive system, and stabilizing blood sugar levels.

If the fermentation process is done right, the jarred fermented or pickled beets have beneficial bacteria, and enzymes, needed for maintaining a healthy body.

The magazine of “International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism” published research on carbohydrates in their December 2010 journal, stating that carbohydrates are a crucial component of a well-designed post-workout meal.

Even if you don’t work out, but are very active, complex carbohydrates are crucial to giving your body the energy it needs to keep you active.

Eating pickled beets from a can or jar done by manufactured preparation can contain high sodium.

Himalayan Pink Salt It is recommended to ferment the beets yourself, because Himalayan salt can be used, as it contains all of the trace minerals, unlike table salt. Using Himalayan salt requires ½ to ¾ less use of salt because of the accompanying trace minerals, and therefore less sodium in your diet.

If you don’t want to do the fermentation yourself, then find a friend or a health food store, such as Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s or the equivalent that will have fermented foods that state using Sea Salt or Himalayan Salt in the fermentation process.

This is a simple salad, but a great food to keep your digestive tract in working order.

Fermented Beet and Fresh Pear Salad with Goat Cheese

1 – 15 ounce jar fermented beets (preferable sea salt or Himalayan salt used in fermentation process)

1 large pear, cored, sliced thin

½ cup sunflower seeds

½ cup white raisins

4 ounces goat cheese

Open jar and drain juice* and pour beets into a salad serving bowl. Add sliced pear, seeds, and raisins, mix and top with chucked goat cheese.

Plate and serve.

*You can choose to pour a small amount of the juice over the salad. If you do drain the juice, drain it into a glass and drink it. It contains vital bacteria, and enzymes for healthy digestion.

For more reading on Fermented foods, consider this article: Protect Foods from Spoilage with Fermentation  and read more about the importance of fermented foods on your health by linking here: Health News Library.

 

 

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The Rich History of Fermented Foods

fermented foods

Fermented foods have a rich history of tradition and methods of fermentation have been passed down through generations. It’s safe to say that fermentation may have saved the human race during times of drastic climatic changes such as droughts and floods.

Every culture has its own history of fermentation and within these various cultures, traditional tastes and methods began to emerge, so we have the Greeks who perfected the fermentation of yogurt and different breads made with cultures such as sourdough.

We know that Egyptians produced sourdough cultures for making bread as early as 4000 B.C.E. and also fermented wine and cheeses. It may have been completely by accident that some fermentation methods were discovered, but these methods have certainly made an impact on the history of food preservation.

As early as 2,000 years ago, the Chinese were building the Great Wall of China and began to ferment cabbage as a way to feed the workers. During an invasion of Genghis Khan in Eastern Europe, he introduced the cabbage and it became a staple among peasants and sailors who took huge kegs on long voyages for its abundance of Vitamin C.

Eventually, the fermented cabbage came to the Americas, where it was known as ‘sauerkraut’ from the German words, sauer (sour) and kraut (vegetable). Although sauerkraut wasn’t originated by the Germans, it is now considered a German dish.

Dairy is an example of a successful attempt to preserve milk. In the early days, wandering nomads carried milk in special animal stomach canteens. Since animal stomachs have the enzyme, rennin, which coagulates (curdles) milk, the nomad would have curdled milk or cheese to eat.

History tells us that Sumarians and Egyptians had cheese as early as 4,000 B.C. and the bible mentions that David, future king of Israel, ate cheese and presented it as a gift to the army of Israel.

Salt began to be used for preserving meats in the form of sausages and later, microorganisms helped to ferment meat and preserve them for later use. Fermenting meats was very important before freezing and refrigeration brought a way to keep meats without the fermenting process.

The history of fermentation the world over is an interesting journey. Every culture has its own fabulous recipes and methods for creating amazing dishes. Explore some of the recipes from around the world and see how fermentation has progressed to the present day.

Read more about the benefits of cultured or fermented foods on your health. Link here and scroll the page to read the 6 posted articles at the Health News Library: http://www.savorthefood.com/tag/fermentation/

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Protect Foods from Spoilage with Fermentation

Protect Foods from Spoilage with Fermentation

It’s amazing that the three types of microorganisms that preserve food during the fermentation process can also cause spoilage. The good news is that it’s fairly easy to keep food from spoiling by knowing which temperature and processing methods to use.

Food spoilage can cause illnesses that can keep you down for awhile, so it’s important to know how the spoiling microorganisms work to avoid the situation. Almost any type of food can be fermented and preserved with no danger whatsoever of developing an illness because of spoilage.

Yeasts come in two types – true and false. The true yeast found in the fermentation process helps to metabolize the sugar and produce gases (carbon dioxide) and alcohol. False yeast occur in foods that contain high acid or sugar levels and grow on a food’s surface rather than within as in the fermenting process.

Bacteria’s worst type of food spoilage is food poisoning. There are spore and non-spore bacteria that grow in low-acid foods such as meat and some vegetables. This type of bacteria can be destroyed by heat and processing for a certain length of time. Pressure cookers are often used to destroy bacteria at high temperature.

Molds are especially harmful to humans if the person has an allergic reaction to them. When someone eats a moldy food, it usually causes stomach discomfort and diarrhea and vomiting. Molds can grow in highly acidic foods, just like yeasts, but can be destroyed by subjecting the foods to high temperatures.

If fresh (uncooked) foods aren’t fermented or cooked, they can produce enzymes that can cause illnesses. One of the reasons why it’s important to pack foods you want to ferment so tightly is that oxidation may occur causing the food to change colors or become rancid.

Protecting fermenting foods from spoiling involves using starter cultures, limiting oxidation and using salt or brine for packing the foods. Sometimes an acidic fruit juice is used to protect the food such as a bit of lemon juice.

The main object of protecting the fermentation process is to get the fermenting process going before the spoilers have a chance to become established in the food. After that is accomplished, the spoilers lose their foothold.

Find out more about preserving foods by fermentation by searching online and taking advantage of books and reports that have been written about the process. Cookbooks for fermenting are also available if you want to try your hand at it.

How to ferment foods bookTo get you started, here is a book you can read on your Kindle for FREE. Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones and tablets. The boook to download and read is: Fermented Foods: How to Ferment Vegetables [Kindle Edition].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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