Organic Coconut Popcorn

Organic non-gmo tri-colored corn kernelsDo you know what’s in that bag of popcorn you put in the microwave? Are you ready for the answer?

1. Diacetyl: It is used a s a flavoring in microwave popcorn. It can obliterate the airways, and lungs if exposed to too much. It was used in World War I, to do exactly that. Factory works who are exposed to the chemical have irreversible lung damage.

Brown University documented three cases of bronchiolitis obliterans (caused by diacetyl) in microwave popcorn lovers. One man, 47, ate three bags a day, and needed a lung transplant. A 56 year old coughed up blood one day, and he ate 3 bags of microwave popcorn a day.

The University of Minnesota reported that the chemical diacetyl, can pass the blood-brain barrier, and weaken the brain’s defenses against the formation of amyloid plaques, causing Alzheimer’s.

2. Perfluorooctanoic Acid: Most manufacturer’s  line the microwave popcorn bags with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) to keep grease from leaking out. When the bags are heated, they leach the PFOA into the popcorn.

3. Tertiary Butylhydroquinone (TBHQ): This chemical is made from butane, a known toxic gas. Medical studies have reported that just eating 1 gram could cause ADHD in children, asthma, allergies, dermatitis, and dizziness. It’s been associated with stomach cancer in laboratory animals.

Most of the corn in the U.S.A., about 86% is harvested from GMO seeds. We also noted, microwavable popcorn is not sold in health food stores. But you can buy lose non-gmo corn kernels, or in jars, and that brings us to our featured recipe: Organic Coconut Popcorn. Here is what you will need.

heating coconut oil

Heat 3 tablespoons of refined coconut oil in a 3 quart pan over medium heat. Let oil solids melt. From 1/3 cup of organic popcorn kernels, add 4 kernels to heated oil and cover pan with lid. When the kernels pop, remove pan from heat and add the 1/3 cup of kernels to pan in an even layer. Return lid to pan and count to 30. Return pan to heat and wait for kernels to start popping. Once they do, gently shake pan over heat. When you no longer hear any popping remove pan from heat and add popcorn to a serving bowl.

melting butterWith pan still hot, add organic pasture fed cows butter or organic virgin coconut oil, and melt. Next pour over popcorn and mix in. You can also add Himalayan salt, organic smoked paprika, or organic Parmesan cheese.

Organic Coconut Popcornpopcorn pan not burned using coconut oilFollow this method and ever kernel of popcorn will always pop evenly and not burn, not even the pan. You can never say that about those chemical filled microwave popcorn bags.

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Raspberry Tiramisu

Raspberry Tiramisu

Probably the most famous of all Italian desserts, is the Tiramisu.

Tiramisu in the Italian language, means “pick me up” or “cheer me up.”

It is a coffee-flavoured Italian dessert. It is made of ladyfingers (sponge cake) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of eggs, sugar, and mascarpone cheese, and flavored with cocoa.

Most accounts of the desserts origin date its invention to the 1960s in the region of Veneto, Italy, at restaurant named “Le Beccherie” in Treviso.

Specifically, the dish is claimed to have first been created by a confectioner named Roberto Linguanotto, owner of “Le Beccherie.”

Some debate remains, however. As others say the dessert may have been made as far back as the Renaissance area.

Italian cookbooks did not include recipes for Tiramisu until the 1980s, when it literally became one of the most popular desserts in Europe and the United States.

Since then, others have gotten away from the traditional cake by making a Chocolate-Raspberry Tiramisu, and a Mango Tiramisu with Raspberry Sauce.

Raspberry Tiramisu

2 lemons

Raspberry Tiramisu - in cake dish1/3 cup granulated sugar

3 tbsp. granulated sugar

3 sprigs fresh mint

3/4 cup filtered water

8 oz. mascarpone

8 oz. whole-milk ricotta

1 1/2 cup heavy cream

4 cups raspberries, fresh or frozen (thawed)

2 packages lady fingers (each package contains 20 cookies)

lemon peel mint sugur waterWith a vegetable peeler, remove rind of one lemon in strips and place into a medium sauce pan. With the other peeled lemonlemon finely grate the zest and place aside.

Next add 1/4 cup of lemon juice, sugar, mint, and water into the sauce pan with the lemon rind. Bring pan to a boil, lower heat, simmer for 1 minute.

Set pan aside to let cool completely, then discard the lemon zest and mint. You should have 1 cup (8 ounces) of prepared lemon syrup.

mixing dairy products, zest and sugar - folding in raspberries for Raspberry TiramisuAdd mascarpone, ricotta, reserved zest and remaining 3 tablespoons sugar to a large bowl, and mix together with an electric beater on medium speed until smooth.

Reduce the mixer speed to low and gradually add the heavy cream, mixing to incorporate. Increase the mixer speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form.

Fold in the raspberries with a large mixing spoon or spatula, gently mashing them against the sides of the bowl.

building the Raspberry TiramisuUsing a baking dish that will allow for a two layer cake, line a 9 X 9-inch baking dish with lady fingers, as shown in illustration.

Drizzle half the lemon syrup over the lady fingers, then top with half the cream mixture (about 4 cups).

Repeat with the remaining fingers, syrup and raspberry cream. Refrigerate for 1 hour or up to 24 hours.

After one hour of refrigeration, cover the dish so cream doesn’t give you a dried out look.

Raspberry Tiramisu -LgPlate and serve. If you wish top each plated serving with mint and fresh raspberries.

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What Do You Really Know About GMO Foods

What Do You Really Know About GMO Foods

We found this article that is entitled – Does It Really Matter If You Eat GMO Foods? we think after you read this article, you will think twice about eating food supplies that have been harvest from gmo crops.

Does It Really Matter If You Eat GMO Foods?

The Denver Post LIFESTYLES posted in their paper on May. 26, 2015 that GMO (genetically modified organisms) labeling is now part of a huge national conversation that started, ironically, after Dr. Oz was attacked as an enemy of genetically modified organisms (April 23, 2015 showing of “The Dr. Oz Show” – Denver Post)

Does it really matter if you eat GMO foods and should they be identified or labeled? If you have a concern about what you are eating, how it is grown, and where it comes from, then we would say YES.

Consider what is in genetically modified seeds, Round-up. Most of us are familiar with what Round-up is. It kills all plant life, weeds, grass, and eatable plants alike…Read 567 words more here

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The article also has a video of an interview with Dr. Stephanie Seneff, a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, were in she states, that glyphosate (used in Round-up) is causing havoc on human health.

Read the article and consider this info-graphic as well on possible foods you may be purchasing that are GMO’s.

Stop GMO Foods

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Pickled Mini Sweet Peppers

Pickled Mini Sweet Peppers

February is National Canning Month in the United States. Why, you may ask in the middle of winter? I am not really sure why. It would seem that the mid summer months  on in to October would seem more appropriate, when most summer fruit and vegetables are at there peak and are being harvested.

To honor the occasion, Registrar Corp is presenting important information about U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) registration regulations for Food Canning Establishments (FCE), according to PRWeb.

The process of canning food in the United States dates back to May of 1862 when Abraham Lincoln signed into law the Agricultural Act that established the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

By 1901 the canning company who went by the name “Norton Brothers” joined with 60 other firms to form the American Can Company. Canning food back in the early 1900’s was fairly new, and food was canned in different containers, including glass jars and tin cans.

pickling  seasoning with salt and coconut sugarDuring the early years of commercial canning, there were numerous cases of botulism outbreaks. But the industry canned on, until they got it right.

Salt as well as sugar is the secret to canning. Salt flavors and preserves. It also creates a hostile environment for microorganisms that would otherwise spoil foods.

This is why the amount of salt you put in most brined pickle recipes is critical. It also applies to caning other food products.

Salt helps keep the brine and canned food at a balanced pH level that prevents bad bacteria from forming. Sugar can do the same thing, such as in canned jams and jellies.

Good bacteria also need nutrients to grow. In our canning we used Himalayan salt, which contains 72 trace minerals., minerals we thrive on for good health. We tried something a little different in our recipe, we used coconut sugar, in place of white refined sugar. Because of that our pickling brine is not clear, but it has good flavor.

Let’s get started with our feature canning recipe and here is what you will need:

10 ounces mini sweet peppers (yellow, red and orange), ends cut off and remove seeds

2 fresh Serrano peppers, seeded, and thinly sliced

1 cup water

mini sweet peppers marinating in brine1 cup white vinegar

1/4 cup coconut sugar (or granulated sugar)

2 tablespoons pickling spices

1 1/2 tablespoons Himalayan salt

Place peppers in a large heat-proof bowl and set aside.

In a medium stainless steel saucepan combine water, vinegar, sugar, pickling spices, and salt.

Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat until sugar and salt has dissolved.

mini sweet peppers in jar waiting for brinePour hot vinegar mixture over peppers and cool, until brine temperature reaches about 75 to 80 degrees.

Transfer to two 4 cup glass containers with lids. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to 1 month.

seeding and veining Serrano chiliesSerrano peppers can be hot, because of their volatile oil content. When seeding them as well as removing the veins, you need to be careful not to touch your eyes, as they will burn.

Avoid direct contact with chilies as much as possible. When working with chili peppers, use a spoon to remove the veins and seeds. First cut the stem, then cut in half from the top to the bottom of the pepper.

Grab the bottom tip of the chili with one hand and slide a spoon under the seeds and veins to completely remove them. Then cut into strips and cut in half each strip depending the length of the chili pepper.

Each jar has 8 servings each. Each serving is 1/4 of a cup.  Enjoy 3 sweet peppers per day, as they provide 200% of your daily need for vitamin-C, your epidermis (skin) will thank you.

 

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Slow Cooking, is it Safe?

crock-pot and recipe book

Original Post February 17, 2014 – Updated October 1, 2021

In early times past, food stuff such as roots, vegetables and meats were wrapped in leaves and placed on warm or hot rocks that made a ring around a fire.

The wrapped food was left there for a long period of time. Early cooks discovered that cooking this way tenderized tough plants and meats, and released more flavor into the food.

This concept or type of cooking was carried over into  pot-based cooking over fires and eventually to stoves.

History of the Crockpot

This tradition of slow cooking was first commercialized by the Naxon Corporation with its electric slow cooker intended only for beans.

Rival Corporation bought Naxon in 1971. Rival redesigned the slow cooker and branded the bean cooker as the crockpot.

The original crockpot’s stoneware liner wasn’t removable. Than In 1974 the product was redesigned with a removable liner, for easy cleaning.

Aside from cosmetic changes and the addition of larger sizes, crockpots remained virtually unchanged until the introduction of a programmable crockpot in 2001.

Is Slow Cooking Safe

Yes, the slow cooker, a countertop electrical appliance, cooks foods slowly at a low temperature—generally between 170° and 280° F. The low heat helps less expensive, leaner cuts of meat become tender and shrink less.

The direct heat from the pot, lengthy cooking and steam created within the tightly-covered container combine to destroy bacteria and make the slow cooker a safe process for cooking foods.

Use Caution When Using A Slow Cooker

Some disadvantages to crockpot cooking are: vitamins and nutrients are lost because of enzyme action during cooking.

Raw beans must be boiled before cooking to remove an enzyme that can cause food poisoning. Canned beans do not require boiling, as they are boiled in the canning process.

A slow cooker is certainly convenient, but if not used correctly there is the potential for food-safety hazards.

Temperatures between 40° and 140°F fall into the so-called “Danger Zone,” and bacteria thrive at these temperatures.

When using a slow cooker be sure to take precautions that keep food from being in the Danger Zone for too long.

To avoid the Danger Zone, never add frozen ingredients to your cooker, refrigerate any ingredients you’ve prepped ahead in separate storage containers and bring liquids to a simmer if you’re cooking on Low before adding them to your cooker to give the heating process a jump-start.

Never attempt to cook a whole chicken or roast in your slow cooker: large hunks of meat won’t cook thoroughly enough in the slow cooker.

So when cooking with meat, make sure it’s cut into smaller pieces that will cook throughout.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) state that bacteria grow the fastest between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit.

Depending on the meat, it needs to be cooked to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit to kill most bacteria (poultry should be cooked to 165 degrees Fahrenheit and ground meat to 160 degrees Fahrenheit).

Even if your food is eventually cooked to the proper temperature, if it stays too long in the 40-140 range, it will house much more bacteria than if cooked properly.

When possible, preheat the Crock-Pot before you add the food. This process will ensure the food is not kept at a temperature that allows bacteria to grow rapidly.

In addition to preheating, setting the temperature to a high setting for the first hour before switching to the low setting will help to ensure the food reaches the correct, safe eating temperature.

It is recommended to never use a crockpot to reheat already cooked foods, but have been stored in the refrigerator.

Also it is worthy to note, that crockpots bought with in the last 5 to 6 years do cook faster than the older models.

Therefore, not leaving the raw foods to long in the temperature danger zone (40 and 140 degrees).

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Sources of information: 7 Tricks for Better Slow-Cooking in Your Crock Pot    Safety Tips Regarding Crock-Pots    Crockpot History

 

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