Bruschetta with Chicken Salad & Cheddar Cheese

In the United States, the word Bruschetta is used to refer to a prepared topping, which is typically sold in jars at local markets and are usually tomato-based.

An example of viewing Bruschetta in the U.S as a topping, is – Healthy Canning – a website that aims to direct people towards information on canning that is safe and healthy.

One of their posts is – Bruschetta in a jar: tomatoes in dry white wine with basil and oregano.

The article goes on to say, “Open a jar, drain, and serve on toasted Italian bread with a good Italian cheese and a drizzle of fruity olive oil.”

Here is a photo of Healthy Canning’s Bruschetta in a jar. It’s a delicious looking canned tomatoes with wine, and herbs.

Check Out Healthy Canning For Healthy Recipes and How To Safely Can Them

What Is A Bruschetta

Actually though, a tomato based Bruschetta is unheard of in Italy.

As this image shows, a product of Italy jarred sweet peppers offered as a Bruschetta topping.

In Italy, a Bruschetta is an antipasto dish starter that is prepared with toasting or grilling bread (typically Italian bread) and rubbing it with garlic and topped with olive oil and salt.

In other words, a Bruschetta is a fancy way of saying, “put it on toast”.

Toppings for a Bruschetta can include, Healthy Canning’s canned tomatoes, wine and herbs or vegetables, fruit, beans, cured meats and cheese.

Or try this Sweet Tomato Chutney as a Bruschetta topping. It is made with Roma and heritage orange tomatoes, garlic, sweet onion and spices.

The recipe featured is sliced whole wheat French bread Bruschetta topped with a chicken salad and cheddar cheese.

Bruschetta can be served hot or cold, and is always a quick and easy appetizer to any casual meal.

History of Bruschetta

Bruschetta originated in Italy during 15th century.

The dish though, can be traced back to Ancient Rome when olive growers would bring their olives to a local olive press and taste a sample of their freshly pressed oil using a slice of bread.

Typically, bruschetta is served as a snack or appetizer.

It can also be made for brunch, or prepared and taken to parties, dinner gatherings and potlucks.

Bruschetta with Chicken Salad & Cheddar Cheese

For the Bruschetta

1 loaf whole wheat Italian or French bread, sliced thick, about 1 1/2 inch slice

1/2 – 1 cup olive oil

1 teaspoon Harissa seasoning, optional

Salt and black pepper to taste

Brush olive oil onto bread slices, one side only.

Next sprinkle some Harissa seasoning over olive oil brushed bread slices.

Place bread into a large iron skillet and place skillet under broiler and broil bread until lightly toasted.

Remove skillet from heat and set toasted bread aside.

The Cheese

1 slice mild cheddar cheese per bread slice

The Salad

2 cups cooked shredded chopped chicken breast or shredded chopped rotisserie chicken

1/3 cup mayonnaise

2 tablespoons sweet pickled relish

1/2 cup chopped celery

1/4 cup chopped white onion

salt and pepper to taste

In a large bowl place all prepared salad ingredients and mix until well combined.

Spoon 2 or 3 heaping tablespoons of salad on to bruschetta.

Next top bruschetta and chicken salad with a slice of cheese.

Place and arrange bruschetta slices with toppings into a large cast iron skillet.

Put skillet under high heat broiler until cheese is melted and bubbling a little but not burnt.

Plate bruschetta and eat alone or with a side dish of your choice. Here bruschetta is plated with a broccoli slaw.

Want a fruity chicken salad to top your Bruschetta? Then you love preparing this Mango Guacamole Chicken Salad.


Maple Syrup – The Same As Cane Sugar – Recipes Included

Research involving cane sugar at the University of California-San Francisco reports that sugar is essentially a toxin that causes all sorts of lifestyle diseases, including hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and even cancer.

Sugar is just about in every day foods bought. Such as bread, low-fat yogurt, soy milk, bbq sauce, tomato sauce, chocolate milk, cereals, smoothies, cookies, and muffins among many other foods.

If you were to have just one serving of each of the foods in the above image, you would have consumed about 13 tablespoons of sugar or 37 – 40 teaspoons.

That’s 30 teaspoons past the daily recommended intake by USDA of only 10 teaspoons or 3 tablespoons (The Question of Sugar – USDA).


You’ll enjoy this read – National Maple Syrup Day – is every year on December 17th.


The Alternative To Cane Sugar

There is an alternative sweetener, and what most people don’t know is that it beats out all the others.

What is the alternative? Maple syrup. Maples taste profile is even better than sugar.

Maple Syrup Flavor

Maple syrup has caramel notes along with the woodsy maple flavor that you might expect from a maple syrup product.

Maple syrup can have a complex flavor with notes of vanilla, cinnamon and even hazelnut.

Cane sugar tastes highly refined and incredibly sweet.

Maple Syrup Health Benefits

Maple syrup contains 100 essential nutritional compounds including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, phytohormones, and 67 polyphenols.

A study done by the University of Rhode Island – The College of Pharmacy, reported that maple syrup has antioxidants and minerals that deem this syrup a superfood (Study Source).

The researchers said that in their laboratory research they found several compounds that possessed anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been shown to fight cancer, diabetes and bacterial illnesses.

When examining other sweeteners, real maple is higher in – magnesium, calcium, zinc, manganese, and potassium than honey, brown sugar, and white sugar.

The USDA Nutritional Database, says a 1/4 cup serving of Real Maple Syrup supplies 95% of our daily intake of manganese, 37% of riboflavin, 7% of magnesium, 6% of zinc, 5% of calcium and 5% of potassium.

The database also reports maple syrup is higher in antioxidants than cabbage, tomatoes, and cantaloupe.

Real Maple Syrup has a glycemic index of 54, and is defined as having a “medium” index.

Cane Sugar on the other hand, has a glycemic index of 68 and is defined as having a “high” index.

Honey has a glycemic index of 60 – Brown sugar has a glycemic index of 70.

If your vegan, maple syrup is an alternative to honey. It is also fat-free.

Eating and Cooking With Maple Syrup

Maple syrup can be used for more than just pancakes.

It can be used as an easy replacement for sugar in coffee, tea, and lemonade, as a homemade salad dressing, in baking, in marinades, and on roasted vegetables.

Here are a few recipes that use real Maple syrup.

Balsamic Vinegar Compliments More Than Just a Salad

Balsamic Vinegar Complements More Than Just A Salad

Balsamic vinegar enhances nearly any food it touches as it is so much more than a salad dressing.

You can use balsamic vinegar to marinate meats, glaze roasted vegetables and even as a baking ingredient.

The process of making balsamic vinegar is a more than 900 year old tradition from Italy.

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

Fennel and Spinach Salad with Shrimp and Balsamic Mustard Vinaigrette

How Balsamic Vinegar Is Made

Balsamic vinegar is made by pressing grapes complete with the stem, seeds, and skin.

The unfermented grape juice, also called “grape must,” is reduced and then cooked down and aged in hard wood barrels either oak, cherry or walnut, to create a delicate flavor that expertly balances both sweet and savory.

Depending on the wood barrels being used, flavor is added to the essence of the balsamic gradually over time.

As it ages, moisture evaporates out, further thickening and concentrating the balsamic.

Balsamic-Honey Glazed Chicken and Asparagus

Balsamic-Honey Glazed Chicken and Asparagus

Traditional Balsamic verses Commercial Made

Many consumers outside of Italy are unaware of the fact that there are two types of balsamic vinegar.

According to Compass and Fork, the balsamic vinegars sold at a local market or gourmet food shops are commercially made vinegar, and even if it says Modena on it, it has not been produced according to the traditional standard.

Roasted Sweet Potatoes and Figs

Roasted Sweet Potatoes And Figs – with a Balsamic Dressing

To be able to be labelled as a balsamic from Modena, only one step in the process has to be performed and it can be to any quality standard.

Though the bottled balsamic vinegar is sold at moderate pricing, it is only bottled in Modena.

Wine Vinegar Included – Not Traditionally Made

Traditionally produced balsamic vinegar is also protected under labeling laws, with only products made in a particular way and in Modena bearing the Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena label.

How To Use Balsamic Vinegar

There are three basic age groups of balsamic vinegar, and each is used differently:

Group One

The youngest group, 3 to 5 years, is good for salad dressings, dipping sauces for vegetables and bread, sauces and marinades.

Group Two

The middle age group, 6 to 11 years, is more viscous and is quite versatile. Use it in sauces (at the end of cooking), in risotto and pasta dishes, in marinades and mixed with mayonnaise or sour cream for a sandwich condiment.

Group Three

Well-aged balsamic vinegar (12 to 150+ years) is best used after the cooking is finished, and in otherwise mild dishes (nothing spicy or heavily seasoned), so it can shine on its own.

Use it to flavor meat like chicken, steak, fish or veal. It is well-suited to fruit and cheese pairings, such as strawberries, peaches and pears, along with ricotta or feta cheese.

Smoked Bacon And Goat Cheese Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Smoked Bacon And Ricotta Cheese Stuffed Chicken Breasts – with a Balsamic Drizzled over Chicken

It may be enjoyed by itself (just a tiny amount) or added to water (or sparkling water) for a refreshing beverage.

Flavors Infused with Commercially Made Balsamic Vinegar

There are commercially made balsamic vinegars that are infused with different flavors such as but not limit too:

  •  Chile Balsamic Vinegar
  • Garlic Cilantro Balsamic Vinegar
  • Strawberry Balsamic Vinegar
  • White Sesame Ginger Balsamic Vinegar
  • Pomegranate Balsamic Vinegar
  • Cranberry Balsamic Vinegar

What Others are saying about Balsamic Vinegar:

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Herbs De Provence Fried Potatoes Over Smoked Gouda

Herbs De Provence Fried Potatoes Over Smoked Gouda

Herbs De Provence is a mixture of dried herbs procured in the southeastern region of France.

The blend of herbs contain savory, marjoram, rosemary, thyme, and oregano.

Lavender leaves are also included with production in the North American market.

Herbs de Providence
Herbs de Providence

The herb mixture is typically used with grilled foods and stews and are used before or during cooking.

A fat is added to the pan, like butter or a vegetable oil prior to cooking so as to infuse the flavor into the food.

Smoked Gouda Cheese

Gouda is made from pasteurized cow’s milk but some varieties are also are made from sheep or goat’s milk.

Smoked Gouda is named after the south #Holland province Gouda – where the cheese was originally developed.

Smoked Gouda Cheese

Gouda is described as a semi-hard cheese with a mild flavor, and gets it richer taste from smoke-curing it.

The cheese gets its smoky flavoring from shavings or chips from hickory trees.

Among all the smoked cheese produced and sold, smoked Gouda comes in 2nd place followed by Provolone, Rauchkase, Scamorza, Sulguni, Oscypek, Fynsk rygeost, and smoked Cheddar.

First place smoked cheese is smoked Gruyère – a cheese from Switzerland.


Top Nine Varieties Of Cheese’s Enjoyed By Food Lovers


Yukon Gold Potatoes

The Yukon Gold potato was created in the 1960s by Gary Johnston, scientist and agricultural icon in Canada.

He bred the first Yukon Gold variety at Ontario Agricultural College in 1966 from a white fleshed potato from North Dakota, called norgleam with a wild South American yellow-fleshed variety.

The flesh of a Yukon Gold potato is richly flavored and fairly firm and moist, with medium starch content.

Their medium starch content allows them to hold up to a variety of preparations, including boiling, baking, sauteing and frying.

The frying method, called sautéing, quickly cooks the potatoes at a temperature high enough to brown them.

These golden fried potatoes can be used as a dish for breakfast or dinner.

Herbs De Provence Fried Potatoes Over Smoked Gouda

1 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes peeled, diced 1/2 inch

1 tbsp olive oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 teaspoon herbs de Providence

Salt and pepper

Add olive oil to a skillet over medium-low heat.

Add the potatoes and stir to coat. Season with salt and pepper.

Cook potatoes, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes

Add garlic and herbs and cook for 5 more minutes or until potatoes are tender and garlic and herbs are fragrant.

Set skillet aside.

Next add a slice of Gouda to a plate. Top with some fried potatoes. Set aside.

Fried Potatoes Over Smoked Gouda Cheese

Fry an egg any style you like. Sunny side up – over medium or with yoke cooked.

Once egg is cooked serve over potatoes and cheese. Top with chopped parsley, cilantro, or dill. Your choice. Enjoy!

You love potatoes? Then you’ll also like making this dish: Roasted Red Potatoes with Garlic Parmesan.

Oven Roasted Gnocchi with Sausage and Peppers

The first known use of gnocchi was in 1891.

Gnocchi is an Italian dumpling. With simple ingredients, like potato flour, water, and eggs.

This dish originates from the Northern part of Italy. Due to the colder Northern Italian climate, potatoes are easier to grow than wheat grain.

Culinary Inventors of the Dumpling

The Chinese are the culinary inventors of the dumpling. Just as long noodles represent longevity, and dumplings represent wealth and prosperity.

At family dumpling-making gatherings on the eve of the new year, a coin may be slipped into a dumpling for good luck.

The little dough balls are usually stuffed with various ingredients from chives and shrimp to pork and cabbage.

Gnocchi verses Dumplings

What is the difference between gnocchi and dumplings?

First of all, the word gnocchi in Italian means “little dumpling.”

A gnocchi is a dumpling. The difference though, is that gnocchi is not stuffed or filled with anything as other types of dumplings are.

Instead of putting a filling inside of the dough, the “filling” ingredients are mixed with the dough, and a ball is formed afterward.

Gnocchi like dumplings can either be steamed, boiled, deep-fried, pan-fried, or roasted in the oven.

Oven Roasted Gnocchi Sausage and Peppers

1 pound sweet Italian sausage, casings removed, crumbled

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 small red bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small orange bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small red onion, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

8 ounces fresh cherry tomatoes (different colors), sliced in half

One 17.5-ounce package potato gnocchi

1/4 cup grated Parmesan, plus more for serving

1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves, chopped

1 pound sweet Italian sausage, casings removed, crumbled

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 small red bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small orange bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small red onion, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

8 ounces fresh cherry tomatoes (different colors), sliced in half

One 17.5-ounce package potato gnocchi

1/4 cup grated Parmesan, plus more for serving

1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves, chopped

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Toss together the oregano, red pepper flakes, garlic, bell peppers, onion, tomatoes, 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of black pepper on a sheet pan.

Top with sausage and gently shake the pan a few times to evenly distribute.

Roast in preheated oven until the sausage is cooked through and the vegetables are soft, 18 to 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, toss the gnocchi with the Parmesan, remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1/2 teaspoon salt. 

When sausage is cooked, remove sheet pan and turn the oven to broil.

Sprinkle the gnocchi over the sausage and vegetables and place under broiler until dark golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes.

Divide among 4 plates and if you wish, sprinkle with fresh chopped parsley or fresh oregano leaves and Parmesan cheese.

Why We Cook

To think about cooking as purely functional would be to look at just one aspect of it. When in fact there are several reasons why we cook.

Cooking makes food more edible and in doing so cuts down on the time it takes to digest it.

Some foods we can eat raw, but there are others that need to be cooked, like meat or eggs for example.

How To Make The Perfect Egg In One Minute

Humankind has been on the earth for thousands of years and throughout the centuries we have learned the art of cooking.

Yes cooking is an art. If you are a professional-cook or not – when you put together different flavors you are creating a dish to satisfy your taste and hunger.

Frequently Asked Questions about Healthy Cooking

The More You Know

We spend just five percent (5%) of our day eating. So make the food you eat count towards a healthier you. Read more here: First Step To Being Healthy


The bottom line is, we have learned through trial and error that some foods need to be cooked.

So again, ever thought while you are preparing something to eat, why you cook it?

Why We Cook

It makes eating food safe, as cooking destroys bacteria, and the toxins they produce.

The food flavors multiple with using heat to cook. The heat browns meat, vegetables, breads, and cakes.

Roasted Root Vegetables with Brussels sprouts and Bacon

Cooking caramelizes sugar and helps herbs and spices to release their locked in flavors in a process known as the Maillard reaction.

Read More Here About Cooking With Herbs – Spices – and Caramelizing Sugar

How To Spice Thngs Up When Cooking
Spanish Flan – recipe and video on How To Carmelize Sugar

Food that has been cooked helps with your digestion as it softens starches and releases foods nutrients.

Roasted Red Potatoes with Garlic Parmesan

Cooked food tastes delicious and brings new textures to food.

Cooking To Gather Family and Friends

You may have heard the expression, make friends by “breaking bread together.”

Research has shown that the ritual of cooking and sharing your cooked food with others is entrenched in our psyche, and it brings family and friends together.

Regularly eating cooked food with others also improves our well-being.

Cooking Supports A Healthy Life Style

Here’s a great response to why we cook.

Julia A. Wolfson, MPP, lead author of a study on home cooking and weight lossat the John Hopkins Center, says if you are trying to lose weight or not, people who cook most of their meals at home, consume fewer carbohydrates, less sugar and less fat than those who cook less or not at all (Study Suggests Home Cooking is a Main Ingredient in Healthier Diet).

According to Civil Eats – The power of a communal meal, or eating together – either it be a Thanksgiving feast, a community potluck, or a dinner-table gathering can build cultural ties and tear down political walls.

So now you know. Let’s get cooking.

Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

Risotto is a dish that is creamy, scrumptious and filling.

The beauty of preparing risotto is that you can add just about anything you’d like.

You can use various types of vegetables, herbs, and meat. You can make with or without meat.

Risotto is a comfort food, as it is filling, and is a wonderful dish for leftovers.

Risotto can be a side dish (without meat) but it is also often consumed as a complete meal (when prepared with meat).


Pumpkin Pecan Risotto with Dried Cranberries and Goat Cheese


Unlike other rice that is left in a pot of water to boil, risotto rice requires constant attention to ensure a perfectly finished dish.

The rice is not to be pre-rinsed, boiled, or drained, as washing would remove much of the starch required for a creamy texture.

When Arborio rice is cooked slowly with stock (usually chicken or vegetable stock) it allows the amylopectin starch to be released.

As a result, the rice takes on a smooth, creamy texture.

A 1/3 cup of uncooked Arborio rice (used in preparing risotto) has about 166 calories.

Bacon and Spring Pea Risotto

4 pieces bacon

1/2 yellow onion, diced

2 cups arborio rice

4 cups chicken stock, hot

1 cup frozen peas and carrots

1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Zest of 1 lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

Cut bacon into small bite-sized pieces. Add to a large, deep, skillet and cook until crispy. Remove from pan to cool.

Drain most of the bacon grease, leaving about 1 Tbsp. in the pan. Add diced onions and cook on low heat until translucent.

Turn heat to medium and add uncooked rice to the pan. Stir to coat in bacon grease.

Add 1 cup hot chicken stock, reduce heat to low and stir while rice absorbs the liquid. Once it’s absorbed, add another 1 cup and repeat until all the liquid is gone and rice is tender.

This process should take about 20 minutes.

Next, add to tender rice frozen peas and carrots, lemon zest, cilantro and bacon. Mix in well.

Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve warm.

Blood Orange Upside Down Cake

The blood orange is a member of the citrus family, it is both beautiful in color and delicious in flavor.

They are in season from December through May, though the exact months vary depending on what type of blood Orange you’re baking or cooking with.

The most common variety available in markets is the the Moro variety.

Moro Blood Orange

The Moro blood orange is the most colorful of the blood oranges, with a deep red flesh and a rind with a bright red blush.

The deep red flesh means the orange ranges in color from orange veined ruby coloration, to vermilion, to vivid crimson, to nearly black.

Different Hues of the Blood Orange

The flavor is stronger and the aroma is more intense than a normal orange. The fruit has a distinct, sweet flavor with a hint of raspberry.

Are Blood Oranges Naturally Red

Author Harold McGee explains in his book “On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen” – that a blood orange owes the deep maroon color of their juice to anthocyanin pigments, which develop only when night temperatures are low, in the Mediterranean autumn and winter.”

On Food and Cooking

What are anthocyanin pigments? The pigment is found naturally in a number of eatable plants.

These pigments are what produces the red, purple, and blue coloring of eatable plants, such as the blueberry, cherry, and strawberry among others.

The anthocyanin pigments will only develop when temperatures are low at night, as during the Mediterranean fall and winter.

In addition to acting an antioxidant, anthocyanins help fight free radicals, and are found to offer anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer benefits.

Nutritional Value of The Blood Orange

A fresh blood orange is a rich source of vitamins C (20% or greater of the Daily Value), a moderate source of folate (15% of the Daily Value) and dietary fiber.

The orange also has potassium, which is needed for healthy blood pressure and the absorption of zinc.

Interesting Facts About The Blood Orange

Within Europe, the arancia rossa di Sicilia, or the red orange of Sicily, has Protected Geographical Status.

According to The National Gardening Association, the flavor of blood oranges is essentially a cross between an orange and a raspberry.

garden.org

Blood Orange Upside Down Cake

This recipe is baked in a 9-inch spring form pan. But we used four, 5-inch spring form pans. Using this size is up to you, but using them makes individual small sized cakes.

Cakes this size are great for serving at gathers, tea parties, and brunch.

5-inch sized Blood Orange Upside Down Cake

• 2 sticks plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

• 2/3 cup light brown sugar

• 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

• 4 medium-sized blood oranges

• 1 cup fine cornmeal, may sub almond flour

• 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

• 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

• 1/2 teaspoon salt

• 1 cup granulated sugar

• 4 large eggs, at room temperature

• ⅓ cup sour cream

• 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place a 9 inch round piece parchment paper into a 9-inch round spring form pan.

Note: If using the 5-inch spring forms – do the same and place a piece of parchment paper in the bottom of pans.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt 3 tablespoons butter. Add the brown sugar and lemon juice. Stir until sugar melts, about 3 minutes. Scrape mixture into bottom of prepared pan (pans).

Grate 1/2 teaspoon zest from one of the oranges, then slice off the tops and bottoms of oranges.

Place oranges on a clean, flat surface, and slice away the rind and pith, top to bottom, following the curve of the fruit.

Slice each orange crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick wheels and discard any seeds.

Arrange orange wheels on top of brown sugar mixture in a single, tight layer.

In a large bowl, whisk together orange zest, cornmeal, flour, baking powder and salt.

In a separate bowl, cream together remaining 2 sticks butter with granulated sugar. Beat in eggs, one a time, then beat in sour cream and vanilla. Fold in the dry mixture by hand.

Scrape batter into pan (pans) over oranges. Transfer to oven and bake until cake is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center emerges clean, 40 to 50 minutes.

Cool cake in pan 10 minutes, then run a knife along pan’s edges to loosen it. Unlock side of pan and remove.

Next, invert cake onto a platter and cool completely before serving.

Microgreens Another Source Of Great Nutrition

Microgreens are young vegetable greens that fall somewhere between sprouts and baby leaf vegetables.

Sprouts are technically the newly germinated seeds, while the microgreens are the 1-2 week-old youngster seedlings.

Sprouts grow more like a fungus, as they are provided with high humidity, an enclosed area, and a low light environment.

Whereas, microgreens grow more like a plant. It absorbs nutrients directly from the seed, soil, or nutrients added to water (if grown hypotonic) and light (photosynthesis).

Hydroponic grown microgreens
Hydroponic Grown Microgreens

Microgreens are rich in potassium, zinc, magnesium, iron, and copper – all of which are essential nutrients for the health of your body.

According to studies that have been conducted on microgreens, they contain up to 40 times more nutrients compared to their fully mature counterparts.

This means that you can get the right amounts of nutrients that you need for optimal health by just adding a few microgreens servings into your diet.

What Do Mircrogreens Taste Like

As noted above, these tiny and edible greens that grow from vegetable and herb seeds pack a nutritional punch and are absolutely delicious.

Generally speaking, microgreens have an intense aromatic flavor.

Here is a small list of the most popular microgreens grown out of over 100 varieties and their description of taste.

• Alfalfa – Mild, nutty, crunchy, pea-like taste

• Arugula – Nutty, peppery

• Broccoli – Mild, crunchy, dense, slightly bitter

• Clover – Mild earthy, nutty, crunchy, juicy

• Cress – Peppery, tangy

• Daikon Radish – Strong, Peppery

Daikon radish microgreen
Daikon Radish Microgreen

• Dun pea – Slight sweet, crunchy, robust flavor

• Kale – Mild, subtly sweet, broccoli-like taste

• Kohlrabi – Mild, sweet

• Lentils – Mild bitter, pea-like taste

• Mung bean – Mild bean taste, slight buttery

• Wheatgrass – Mild sweet, bitter, grassy

How To Use Microgreens

Apart from their nutrition, microgreens also give plated dishes visual appeal that is as a result of their delicateness and vibrancy.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Salad with Microgreens

Microgreens are not only important in giving your dish an appealing look, but also adds taste and texture to the plated food.

Microgreens can be used as a sandwich stuffer, with wraps, burritos, salads, soups, topped on fried or scrambled eggs, and used in smoothies among many other uses.

Pastrami Sandwich with Microgreens

Easy To Grow Year Round

The best part about growing microgreens is their ability to grow all year-round. You can grow them anywhere, whether you want to grow them indoors or in your garden.

Since you can grow them anywhere, you don’t have to wait for the right weather to set in so you can start growing them.

During summer, you can grow your microgreens anywhere as long as there is enough natural sunlight.

During the cooler seasons where sunlight hours are limited and temperatures drop below 40 degrees, you sprout the seeds in your home using a grow light to help them thrive.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Sprouts

Asian pears, also known as apple pears, are a healthy treat that present the best qualities of both the apple and pear.

The fruit is crunchy and sweet fruit that grows to be round like an apple. They do not change texture after picking or storage as do European pears such as the Bartlett or Comice.

Chilling Asian pearsChilling an Asian pear before eating can enhance the delicious flavor.

Asian Pear Health Benefits

According to OAW Health – if you have any of the following health problems, they suggest adding pears to your diet with these few noted health issues among many others:

• Acid reflux

• High cholesterol

• Gas – bloating – constipation – diarrhea

• Intestinal inflammation

• Insulin resistance

• Weight gain

What To Do With The Asian Pear

The pear is often given as a gift throughout East Asia, due to its long shelf-life and delicious flavor.

Because of its wonderful texture, you can enjoy these pears in stir-fries, as well as salads.

And how ironic, as the Asian pear is also called a “salad pear” in Japan.

Asian Pear Carrot and Daikon Radish Sprouts

1 cup daikon radish sprouts

2 cups Asian pears, washed and corded and chop into medium sized pieces

1 1/2 tbsp rice wine vinegar

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes chili flakes

1/8 tsp white pepper

2 1/2 tbsp raw honey

Combine vinegar, red pepper flakes, white pepper and honey – mix well until honey dissolves. Add Asian pear, daikon radish sprouts and carrot.

Mix well and set aside for flavors to meld for at least one hour.

Can be made up to a day in advance and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Serve at room temperature.