Roasted Chicken Drumsticks and Vegetables with Mustard-Tarragon Sauce

Roasted Chicken Drumsticks and Vegetables with Mustard-Tarragon Sauce

Chicken breasts often get all the glory, when it comes to preparing a poultry recipe. It could be that the white meat is top choice. Some do say that the drumsticks and thighs are the juiciest and flavorful meat on a chicken. We would add they inexpensive and easy to prepare as well.

Our featured recipe is a simple way to take those ordinary (I had to add that),  juicy and flavorful chicken drumsticks into an extraordinary meal. You can adapt the recipe and use thighs as well.

Chicken Trivia

Today’s domestic chicken is mainly descended from the wild red jungle fowl of Asia, with some additional input from the grey jungle fowl (Science Daily).

Since their domestication, a large number of breeds have been established, but with the exception of the white Leghorn, most commercial birds are of hybrid origin (cab direct).

Chicken Jokes

Why Did The Chicken Cross The RoadSince we are discussing chicken, we can’t feature the recipe without telling a few chicken jokes.

The Hen got up in the Roosters face and said, “What was you doing with that chick on the other side of the road?”

A duck decided to cross the road, and a chicken appeared from out of no where and said, “Stop, don’t do it, you will never hear the end of it.”

As the Roaster crossed the road he said, “I have a dream, a dream of a world were chickens can cross the road without having our motives questioned.”

Now for our featured recipe: Roasted Chicken Drumsticks and Vegetables with Mustard-Tarragon Sauce, and here is what you will need.

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoon Himalayan salt

1 ½ teaspoons black pepper

1 ¼ pounds small tri-colored baby potatoes

1 pound large rainbow carrots (about 3)

1 red onion cut in ½ inch chucks

1 large lemon, sliced, seeds removed

3 garlic cloves, sliced into three’s

8 large chicken drumsticks

¾ cup white wine, your choice

½ cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon flour

1 tablespoon sweet garlic Dijon mustard (if not able to find, Dijon mustard is fine)

1 ½ tablespoons fresh tarragon

Heat oven to 450 degrees

preparing chopped vegetablesIn a large bowl toss 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper with potatoes, carrots, onion, and garlic. Add mix to a large roasting pan or baking dish.

adding chicken and wine to baking dishNext using a large bowl, add remaining 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoons pepper, and chicken legs. Toss drumsticks to coat with oil. Next arrange the leg on top of the vegetables in the pan, and pour wine into the pan.

Place dish in a preheated oven and roast for 45 to 50 minutes, or until chicken is done and golden but not crispy.

Remove chicken legs and keep warm.

mustard tarragon sauceIn a small bowl or cup, stir together cream and next 3 ingredients until smooth, add to vegetables and stir in mix well. Place dish back into heated oven and bake 5 to 8 more minutes, stirring once, until sauce is thickened.

Roasted Chicken Drumsticks and Vegetables with Mustard-Tarragon Sauce - plattedPlate and serve chicken with vegetables. Your option to sprinkle with additional chopped tarragon.

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National Strawberry Ice Cream Day 2015

National Strawberry Ice Cream Day 2015

Today, January 15, 2015 is National Strawberry Ice Cream Day (USA).

Ice cream is a frozen food usually made from dairy products, such as milk and cream and often combined with fruits or other ingredients and flavors.

Ancient civilizations have served ice for cold foods for thousands of years. Around 200 B.C the Chinese served a frozen mixture of milk and rice. During Nero’s time of ruling over the Roman Emperor (37–68 AD) he had ice brought from the mountains and had it mixed it with fruit.

Introduction of Ice Cream to Europe

In Europe the first recipe for flavored ices appears in France around 1674, and made its appearance to England in the 18th century. In 1718 in England’s capital, London, was published a book titled “Mrs. Mary Eales’s Receipts” which contained an ice cream recipe.

Ice Cream…A New Find in the New World

In the “New World” (USA) ice cream sodas was first introduced in 1874 and by the late 19th century the ice cream sundae came to be. During the American Prohibition (US outlawed the making and serving of any alcohol) the ice cream parlor to some extent replaced the outlawed bars and saloons.

In 1851, in the city Boston, the first commercial factory was built for the production of ice cream.

Eating Ice Cream To Your Hearts Delight

Americans are the number one consumers of ice cream, an average person living in the USA eats 48 pints of ice cream a year. In 2011 the total amount of ice cream consumed in the United States was 1.58 billion gallons.

To make one gallon of ice cream, it requires 192 ounces of milk. Dairy cows produce about 1024 ounces of milk in a day (about 128 8 oz. glasses of milk). That means, if we have calculated appropriately, one dairy cow makes approximately 5.5 gallons of ice cream every day.

Being Thankful for Ice Cream

Let’s give thanks to the cow for ice cream. Really without them, we would not have ice cream, nor would January 15th each year in the United States, be National Strawberry Ice cream Day.

For those of you who are adventurous and would like to make homemade ice cream, here is a recipe we found on food.com by Elizabeth Knicely.

The recipe calls for fresh strawberries. But if you are unable to find fresh ones at your local market, frozen will work as will.

Homemade Strawberry Ice Cream

3 cups fresh ripe strawberries, stemmed and sliced

4 tablespoons lemon juice

1 1⁄2 cups sugar

1 1⁄2 cups whole milk

2 3⁄4 cups heavy cream

1 1⁄2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Combine strawberries, lemon juice, and 1/2 cup of sugar in a bowl and stir. Allow to sit for up to 2 hours.

Strain berries and reserve the juices.

Puree half the berries.

In a medium bowl mix milk and remaining sugar until sugar is dissolved. Stir in heavy cream, leftover juice from the berry mixture, vanilla, and mashed strawberries.

Turn on Ice Cream Machine and pour mixture into the frozen freezer bowl for about 20 minutes.

Add the rest of the strawberries and mix for another 5 minutes.

A NOTE FROM Elizabeth Knicely…

The ice cream will be very soft and creamy. We transferred ours to a container and stuck it in the freezer for about an hour to thicken it up a little the way we like it.

I am looking forward to trying out some other new ice cream recipes now that I see just how easy it is to do! In fact, I have a container of blueberries in the kitchen that I think would be great in ice cream too!

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