Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Mozzarella sticks ate a go to appetizer. Their a finger-food that everyone at the table scrambles to snatch up while the cheese is still hot and extra pull-able or gooey.

Their also a big hit as a happy hour snack.

They’re served on party platters, for lunch and at brunch.

Party platter with mozzarella  cheese sticks

Mozzarella sticks are no cheesy joke, just gooey and delicious.

Deep-fried cheese has been said to originate in Paris, France in the 15th century.

However, recipes for breaded cheese sticks can be traced back to 1393. The original recipe called for the use of Muenster cheese instead of Mozzarella.

According to Vision Launch (who writes about the history of cheese) traditional Mozzarella was made using milk from the Water Buffalo.

What Is Panko

With a unique name, panko is simply a type of breadcrumb.

Panko is a Japanese culinary invention. The word panko in Japanese is “pan” meaning bread and “ko” meaning flour.

Herb Panko breadcrumbs

Authentic panko is baked using a pan connected to an electrical current. The finished product has no crust.

The reason the bread is baked this way is not well documented.

But Upper Crust Enterprises, a company that makes authentic panko in LosAngeles (USA), claims this method started during WWII, when Japanese soldiers fighting the Russians needed to bake bread.

With no oven for baking, they reportedly used electric current to cook bread, creating a product still made today.

If you’re looking for a crisp, crunchy texture when you bake or fry something breaded or with bread crumbs, panko is the way to go.

Herb Panko Mozzarella Cheese Sticks

Mozzarella cheese sticks are a irresistible combination of gooey melted cheese and crisp, golden breading.

  • 1 pound fresh mozzarella, patted dry and cut into sticks or individually wrapped cheese sticks
  • 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup herb Panko breadcrumbs
  • Avocado oil or other neutral-flavored oil, for frying
  • Marinara, warmed, for serving or optional to serve with Tzatziki Sauce

Cut mozzarella lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick slices, then cut again into 4-by-1/2-inch sticks.

Place flour in a shallow dish and season with salt and pepper.

Whisk eggs in a separate dish and season with salt and pepper.

Place mozzarella sticks in flour and coat, tapping off excess flour.

Next dip into eggs batter allowing excess to drip off, and coat with breadcrumbs, patting to adhere.

Transfer mozzarella sticks to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Freeze until firm, at least 1 hour. (Mozzarella sticks can be covered and frozen at this point up to 2 months.)

Breaded mozzarella cheese sticks  on parchment paper

Pour enough oil into a heavy pot (preferably cast iron) to come 2 inches up sides. Heat over medium-high until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350 degrees.

Working in batches, add mozzarella sticks; cook, turning occasionally, until golden and crisp, 2 to 3 minutes (adjust heat as necessary to maintain oil temperature.)

Transfer to a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet to drain.

Plate and serve with marinara sauce or optional to serve with tzatziki sauce.

Rotisserie Chicken Baguette Sandwich With Basil

Rotisserie Chicken baguetteRotisserie chicken sold at Costco and other markets for $4.99 is a great deal. They say that they are actually losing money by doing that, but it gets you in the warehouse or store to by commodities, like food, clothing and other products that they sell. So their loss is made up in the other things that you buy.

Cooking 3 rotisserie chicken on the grill with Charcoal and Briquettes Most are familiar with what a rotisserie chicken is.

For those who are not familiar, the chicken is skewered on a spit or a long solid rod while it is being cooked over an open fire, such as in a fireplace or over a campfire, or roasted in a rotisserie oven.

The rotation of the chicken on the spit cooks the meat evenly in its own juices and allows easy access for continuous self-basting.

Rotisserie cooking was popular in medieval times and in early modern kitchens that had a fire place.

Some fresh baguettes in the basket at the bakery The loaf of baguette that we used is a long thin loaf of French bread.

The history of the baguette according to Wikipedia is that the word “baguette” was not used to refer to a type of bread until the 1920’s, but what we know as a baguette today, may have existed well before then.

The word is derived from the Italian bacchetta which simply means “wand” or “baton.”

Our featured recipe is a delicious meal that can be ready in 20 minutes from start to finish.

Here is what you will need for your – Rotisserie Chicken Baguette Sandwich With Basil

1 (1 lb) loaf baguette

1 (18 oz) bottle bottle of your favorite BBQ sauce (We use BBQ sauces from Whole Foods that do not have soy or canola oil in them)

2 cups cooked and shredded Rotisserie chicken

1/3 cup chopped red onion

3-4 fresh torn basil leaves

2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Cut baguette loaf in half lengthwise.

Pour 1 cup each of BBQ sauce on top of both halves of bread.

Next, place 1 cup of shredded rotisserie chicken onto each baguette half.

Evenly sprinkle 1 cup of mozzarella cheese onto each of the baguette halves.

Evenly sprinkle chopped onion over the cheese between the two baguette halves.

Place the two baguette halves on a cookie sheet and bake for 15 minutes or until cheese has melted and bread is heated through.

Rotisserie Chicken baguetteSprinkle some torn basil leaves over the tops of both baguette halves. Note: do not tear basil leaves until you are ready to place them over the prepared cooked sandwich.

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