Explore the Web Through a Virtual Tour

Explore the Web Through a Virtual Tour

Were you aware of a company called Nude Food? Will, it is a place that sells gluten free, dairy free, and soy free energy bars. Without all those vital Nude foodnecessities for making food, the gluten and dairy that is, what is left? Nutrient dense, raw, organic food.

They even make the claim that it is kosher food. In other words it is in is natural form, never been mixed with something other than what is natural. Much like extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil.

Naked JuiceDid you know there is a juice that has been named Naked Juice?

Yes, and the juice is close to being fresh.

Oh wait, before you slap my face, I don’t mean the juice is fresh like overly bold or impertinent with you, I mean like freshly juiced fruit and vegetables.

Since we have used the word’s nude and naked, does that make you overly uncomfortable? Of course there usually is, or we should say always is one thing that will come to mind with the words nude and naked.

A person who is wearing no close at all. But has this ever come to mind with the word naked, “naked, unprovoked aggression.”

The following are definitions for the word “naked” according to the Free on-line Dictionary:

1. Having no clothing on the body; nude.

2. Having no covering, especially the usual one: a naked sword.

3. Devoid of vegetation, trees, or foliage: the naked ground; naked tree limbs.

4. Being without addition, concealment, disguise, or embellishment: the naked facts; naked ambition.

5. Devoid of a specified quality, characteristic, or element: a look that was naked of all pretense.

6. Exposed to harm; vulnerable: “naked to mine enemies” (Shakespeare).

7. Botany

a. Not enclosed in an ovary: naked seeds.

b. Unprotected by scales: naked buds.

c. Lacking a perianth: naked flowers.

d. Without leaves or pubescence: naked stalks.

8. Zoology Lacking outer covering such as scales, fur, feathers, or a shell.

Even Websters dictionary will start with saying, “the medical definition” of Naked or Nude. I guess they do that to put the reader at ease, having a conversation with those two words, seems to make people uneasy or uncomfortable.

Were you aware that there are many nudist parks throughout the USA? Yes there are, in Utah, Idaho, California, Florida, just to name a few states.

Even some popular food sights will refer to there food photography as food porn, which again the word porn always brings to mind, nudity.

What is the purpose of our article? Will I want to put you at ease, because our blog was mentioned in an article on February. 5, 2015 at A Guy Without Boxers. Roger, the author of the site, is a same gender loving man. He is a professed nudist, and he writes and posts the nonsexual perspective of nudism. Roger is a professor at a local Washington D.C University.

About a year ago, Roger made a comment on one of our posts and then followed our blog. He stated he doesn’t like to cook, but he always passes on some of our recipes to his partner, who is the cook. Roger even had our posted dessert Blueberry Lemon Flognarde for a few of his Sunday Brunches, as well as made it for his parents on his visit to Greece last Fall (2014). He stated his father’s likes were traditional when it comes to food, but his father was very impressed with the dessert.

We were nominated by Roger with the Virtual Blog Tour Award, and he encouraged the nominated blogs to respond and post by Monday, March 2, 2015. But as you can see, I am days late to posting my acceptance of the Virtual Blog Tour Award, and it isn’t on a Monday.

The rules are as follows:

  • Answer four questions about your creative process which lets other bloggers and visitors know what inspires you to do what you do.
  • Write a one-time article which is to be posted on a Monday (the date supplied by your nominator).  This article can be in the same post in which you answered the four questions.
  • Pass the tour on to up to four other bloggers. Give them the rules and a specific Monday to post.

I nominate the following blogs for the Virtual Blog Tour Award…Don’t feel you have to do anything, only join in if you want to! The date to respond is the 13th of April  2015…

I nominate the following:

Parent Rap – I enjoy Jackie’s blog because she writes about parenting advise that really works. She belongs to the local chapter Parents Anonymous® of New Jersey, Inc. She has been supporting other parents in need foe over 20 years now.

Jovina Cooks Italian –  She writes awesome articles about Italy and the cuisine. She stated she use to write for food magazines.

The Militant Negro He write about Politics, Food, Thoughts and Opinions of Facts and Truth as will as Art and Poetry.

Get Everyone Cooking  This blog owner is new to the blogs-fer. His name is Wayne and he believes everyone should get back to health by cooking great homemade food.

Virtual Blog Tour AwardNow as to the four questions. I wasn’t provide with any questions, but all I can say is I, the owner of this website (Splendid Recipes and More) loves cooking.

Cooking at home with fresh food, less canola oil, and using more coconut olive, and avocado oils, has helped to improve my health, among other things.

Cooking is a stress reliever for me, I love cooking for others. Gardening is another love of mine, and I grow my own food as well (a few season’s I was not able). I also enjoy writing about nutrition (Health News Library).

 

 

 

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Is It Really Organic and What Does That Mean Anyway?

Is It Really Organic and What Does That Mean Anyway?

Before you go out and buy a bunch of organic foods blindly, let’s really sit down and talk about what organic means.   Is it really organic?

According to Wikipedia organic foods are “Foods that are produced using methods that do not involve modern synthetic inputs such  as synthetic pesticides and chemical fertilizers. Organic foods are also not processed using irradiation, industrial solvents, or chemical food additives.

So organic food leaves out the things I talked about a couple of posts back. Organic foods are void of pesticides and fertilizers. They aren’t irradiated or processed chemically – all important stuff.

However, the word “organic” is not a legal term in the United States, so sometimes it seems quite meaningless. In the United States, the legal term for organic food is “Certified Organic.” Food can be certified by the USDA when it meets certain conditions set out by the National Organic Program (NOP).

National Organic Program

Certified Organic produce must be grown using organic methods without chemical pesticides, genetically modified ingredients or petroleum or sewage-based fertilizers. It also can’t be processed with irradiation or contain prohibitive preservatives.

Certified Organic livestock must not be given antibiotics or growth hormones. They also need to have access to the outdoors.

When it comes to processed Certified Organic foods, 95% of the ingredients must be grown organically to contain the seal. And if a label says it is “made with organic ingredients,” it only needs to be made of 70-95% organic ingredients.

Food that bears this certification seal is generally thought to provide the consumer protection, but it’s not without its critics. Critics are concerned that the regulations deal with the way the food is grown, but offers no guarantee of the quality of the product. There are also reports that the certification standards are lacking and that includes a 2010 report from the Inspector General.

So what does this all mean for the consumer?

1. Products, especially non-food items, can be labeled as organic, but don’t meet the appropriate guidelines. Non-food products are not subject to the Certified Organic standards.

2. The guidelines may not be enforced properly, causing some foods to be labeled as Certified Organic when they really shouldn’t be.

3. Food that is organic may not actually be certified because the grower chooses not to get Do your researchcertified or isn’t able to get certified because they produce less than $5000 in products each year.

What can you do?

Given all these potential problems with organic labeling, it’s natural to wonder if it’s all worth it. The key is to read labels and be aware of word play. Stating things like “made with organic ingredients” is a typical way of making something sound good, when it may not be quite what it seems. Above all, know where your food is coming from, buy locally and do your homework.

Next post click here: Weird-Looking Heirloom Vegetables: Why They’re Important

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How to Eat Organic on a Budget

A lot of people tell me they love the idea of organic food and would start eating it in a heartbeat but their budgets simply don’t eating organic on a budget allow it. It’s true that organic food can cost considerably more than conventionally grown food…absolutely. The one glimmer of hope is that there has been a downward pricing trend as organic foods became more popular. Still, the prices aren’t low enough for many people, so how can you eat organic when you’re on a budget?

Here are a few ideas you can start with.

Start with one thing at a time. Going organic doesn’t mean you have to go all or none. Take small steps to where you want to go. I also recommend downloading the EWG (Environmental Working Group) Dirty Dozen list that shows you the produce that is most likely to be grown with the most pesticides, so either avoid those or purchase them organically. The list includes items like apples, bell peppers, peaches, potatoes, blueberries, spinach, celery, strawberries and more. They also keep a list of produce that is least likely be grown with as much pesticide, so you may not have to rush into organic versions of those.

You can get the list or download a mobile app here.

Dirty Dozen App

Buy from farmers markets. There are many organic options at farmer’s markets and they are often more affordable than organic fare found at regular supermarkets. You can search Google for “[your town] farmer’s market” or use the Local Harvest website to find markets in your area.

Cut out expensive, processed foods. While processed foods may seem like a great deal because they save time and they appear to be inexpensive, they often don’t provide a lot in the way of portion size or nutritional value and can really eat up a food budget if you rely on them. Try reducing the amount of processed foods you buy and eat more nutrient dense whole foods. It’s good for the budget and good for your health.

Stock up when things go on sale and then can, dry or freeze it. It’s the same money-saving concept that people have been using for years and you can apply it to organic foods as well. Invest in a food dehydrator, canning equipment and freezer-ready containers, so you can store organic foods for later eating.

Make it a goal to eat a fully local and/or organic meal each week. It’s an idea borrowed from TheDailyGreen.com and it’s a good one. If you just try for one meal, you’ll be making a difference without a lot of cost. Plus, leftovers and extra ingredients can be stretched out to additional meals.

Eat more vegetarian meals. I know it’s scary for some meat lovers, me included, but eating more meatless meals gives you so much more money in the food budget. Or if you’re not ready to do vegetarian, consider using smaller portions of meat in your meals. Try things like stir fries and similar meals where meat is simply an accompaniment, rather than the main focus of the meal.

Pick Your OwnPick your own. Don’t be afraid of a little manual labor. Using “you pick” opportunities allows you save a lot of money and stock up for canning, drying and freezing. You can pick a variety of fruits and vegetables. You can look for you picks in your area by visiting PickYourOwn.org, but do confirm they are organic growers first.

Every little bit helps and the better you get at picking the right foods, the more affordable it can be. And remember, the long term health benefits of eating more naturally will likely save you plenty in health costs in the long run.

Just one thing before you head out and stock up on everything…we should talk about what organic really means and we’ll do that in my next post.

Next post click here: Is It Really Organic and What Does That Mean Anyway?

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Eight Reasons Eating Organic is Important to You…and the World around You

This is the second post of Going Organic with guest speaker Grace Simpson. If you missed the Introduction please link here to read: Going Organic

Now for -Eight Reasons Eating Organic is Important to You…and the World around You- with Grace Simpson. way-of-life

It seems like everyone is talking about organic foods like it’s some kind of buzz word or status symbol. I suppose for some, it might be. But for many of us, it’s a way of life that takes us back to a more natural way of living and farming. One that has been destroyed by the machine food production has become today.

Now, I don’t mean to sound like one of those doom and gloom, anti-establishment types. I don’t disparage anyone for choosing the foods that they do. Sometimes it’s an economic necessity. Other times it’s simply not having enough information about what’s really going on with our food. Sometimes it’s just apathy.

“Science may have found a cure for most evils; but we have found no remedy for the worst of them all, the apathy of human beings.” ~ Helen Keller

I’m not sure what I can do about the apathetic, but for people like you who may have budgeting obstacles or are trying to find more information about what’s going into you bodies, I am here to help.

So the first natural question is…why go organic?

farm

Organic eating has a number of benefits and here are just a few of them:

– Organic produce is free of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Even if you wash your produce, you cannot remove all these harmful chemicals that can affect your nervous system, cause cancer and more. Also consider that conventional farming which uses harmful chemicals can contribute to the contamination of our water supply, so supporting organic, you are also supporting a cleaner water supply for all.

– While people may not be quite as concerned, eating organic can help you avoid foods that have been irradiated. Government bodies tout the irradiation process as helpful in reducing harmful bacteria, preventing spoilage and increasing shelf life of foods. However, irradiation reduces the nutritional value of your foods and there is growing concern by researchers that the process may not be as safe as previously thought.

– Avoidance of genetically modified foods or GMOs (genetically modified organisms). While huge biotechnology companies like Monstanto will have you believing that they are increasing the viability of crop growing, there are long-term dangers in GMOs that have caused them to be banned by much of Europe and Japan.

– Organic livestock is fed its natural diet, rather than potentially contaminated grains, antibiotics and hormones. This is in contrast to conventionally-raised livestock that get hormones to help them grow faster and antibiotics are given en masse as a preventative measure to illness. The scary thing is that the preventative measure may be necessary given the poor hygienic conditions of the animals. With organic, animals are raised more humanely and more naturally, eliminating the need for these potentially dangerous situations for both livestock and human.

– Organic growing contributes to improved soil quality. A lot of people don’t realize it, but our soils are so depleted that we no longer get the nutrients we did from our foods a few decades ago. In order to obtain the certified organic label from the USDA, soil must be free of prohibited chemicals for three years and the increased soil quality is a necessary goal for organic farmers. To learn more about a variety of soil studies, check this out.

– Organic farming is more wildlife friendly. From animals to plant species, a more natural ecology is supported through organic methods. There are many studies supporting this including a study from the University of Oxford that found that there is increased biodiversity on organically farmed land.

– Buying organic allows you to support your local economy and farmers. This is good for you because you get fresher foods and also reduces the pollution that results from food transport.

There are so many reasons to go organic and this post touches on just a few of them. Here’s the most immediate one that people can really appreciate. Organic foods simply taste better. This is real food, free of all unnecessary human interventions and inventions. It’s nature’s perfection and once you try it, you probably won’t want to go back to your other options.

Of course, this still leaves the issue of cost and how organic food seems unaffordable to many families today. Well, that is exactly what we’ll be talking about in my next post: How to Eat Organic, Even if You’re on a Budget.

Next post click here:  How to Eat Organic on a Budget and What Organic Really Mean

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Going Organic

Meet Guest Blogger: Grace Simpson on Going Organic

If you’ve ever thought about going organic, you’ve probably had a few questions on your mind.

What does organic really mean?1-a-veg Going Organic

How can it benefit you?

And can it really be done on a budget?

Well, I’ve enlisted a special guest for our site here and her name is Grace Simpson. She’s very educated about organics and is great at helping people understand and ease into a more natural way of eating.

She’ll be here for the next little while sharing great advice and tidbits, so I’ll let her introduce herself…

Hi, I’m Grace. I’ve been studying organic living since the USDA introduced national standards in 2002 and my family has been eating fully organic since about 2006. This subject means a lot to me because I want my family to have the healthiest meals possible. A few other related subjects that I feel are important are our nation’s health, our wildlife and the sustainability of food production.

Even though certified organics have been around for a decade, I know there are still a lot of questions surrounding organic food. That’s why I am so happy to be here to talk about many of those concerns people have.

1-b-growing-veg Going Organic

Here’s what you can expect in the next few posts:

– Why eating organic is important…to you and the world around you.
– How to introduce organics, even if you’re on a budget.
– What does organic really mean and are you really eating organic?
– We’ll also discuss issues surrounding, meats, and produce in more detail.
– Being your own source of organic foods.
– Do you need supplements?

We’re going to cover a lot, but remember, as you start consider the organic lifestyle; you don’t have to do this all at once. Just take it one step at a time adding healthier options slowly and keeping this great earth of ours in harmony.

Next theme click here: Eight Reasons Eating Organic is Important to You…and the World around You

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