Satay Lima Beans in Peanut Sauce

Growing Lima Beans and Enjoying the Benefits

Satay Lima Beans in Peanut Sauce

Now is the time to plant lima beans. They are easy to grow, and they provide an excellent source of many different nutrients. They are a starchy vegetable that are sometimes known as butter beans because of their smooth, buttery texture.

You can buy lima beans dried or canned, but fresh lima beans are harder to come by, and therefore a great vegetable to grow in your garden.

Lima bean podsAs the lima bean grows it looks a lot like a green bean, although the pods are flatter, much like a sweet pea.

They ripen and are ready for harvest in the late summer and autumn.

When you harvest the beans, you will need to shuck the beans out of the pods, and each pod will yield between 3 to 4 fresh lima beans.

Christmas or ChestNut lima beans

Christmas or ChestNut lima beans

 

 

 

The color of the bean you may be familiar with is usually green or cream colored, but there are other colors, which include red, purple, black, brown, and white.

Health Benefits of Lima Beans

Lima beans are one of the few vegetables that contain molybdenum about 141 mcg, which is a part of an enzyme called sulfite oxidase. Sulfites are commonly found in wine, pickles, processed meats and dried fruit.

Sulfite oxidase helps to eradicate and detoxify our bodies of sulfites. A person can be sensitive to sulfites if there is not have enough sulfite oxidase enzymes in the body. As was noted earlier, this enzyme is essential for detoxifying sulfites.

When sulfites are not properly broken down in the body, a person may experience rapid heart rate, headache and confusion.

Lima beans would be a great addition to your vegetable garden as the bean can help control and eradicate sulfites from the body.

The butter bean or lima bean is a source of minerals and B-vitamins, they help to control blood sugar levels and help to lower blood cholesterol levels.

If you are vegetable gardener that is diabetic or has high cholesterol, the lima bean would be a great addition to your garden.

Dietary Fiber and Lima Beans

Lima bean plants in a vegetable gardenLima beans are a starchy vegetable, and are also a great source of soluble fiber, which as we noted helps to lower blood cholesterol, sweeping away any excess buildup of cholesterol.

Because of the fiber, there is no need to worry a lot about the starch. Fibrous vegetables digest slower and do not spike blood glucose.

That is why it is encouraged to eat a potato with its fibrous skin, if not the starch can cause a spike in your sugar levels.

Fiber also binds with the bile acids in the duodenum. It is bile acids that process and make cholesterol.

This is why it is important to consume fiber on a daily basis. Not eating enough fiber can cause your cholesterol to rise to a dangerous level.

Therefore as fiber binds with the bile acids, it passes right through the digestive system without being absorbed and made into cholesterol.

Lima beans are also rich in insoluble fiber, meaning that it bulks up the stool and allows for regular bowel movements and less constipation. Insoluble fiber is excellent for people who suffer with diverticulosis or irritable bowel syndrome.

Lima Beans Can Reduce the Risk of Heart Problems

Lima beans can help reduce your risk of cardiovascular problems. Lima beans also provide a complete protein if you combine them with whole grains, such as whole grain rice.

Lima beans are a type of legume and legumes have been extensively studied as sources of heart disease protection. One 25 year study involved over 16,000 male participants across the world that was at risk for heart disease. The study found that those who ate more legumes had a reduced risk of heart disease.

Another 19 year study in the U.S.A involved male participants who ate high fiber foods, including lima beans. The study noted that those who ate 21 grams of fiber per day had a 12% lesser chance of coming down with heart disease when compared to people who ate less than 5 grams of fiber per day.

Water-soluble fiber was determined to have the best protection against heart disease, and legumes, including lima beans alone decreased the risk of dying from heart disease by 82%.

Magnesium And Folate

Lima beans contain high amounts of magnesium, manganese, iron, and folate per serving. The folate is a vitamin that lowers the quantity of homocysteine in the bloodstream, which is a risk factor for all forms of heart disease, including stroke, heart attack, and peripheral vascular disease.

The magnesium in lima beans acts as calcium channel blockers, which lowers blood pressure and improves the flow of nutrients and oxygen within the bloodstream. A lack of magnesium in the diet can lead to heart problems and the liberation of oxygen free radicals in the body, which are dangerous to all cells of the body.

The Best Way To Eat Lima Beans

You can eat them alone, salted, or incorporate them into soups and casseroles.

With their buttery flavor, lima beans are a great addition to soups, stews, casseroles. Cooked, cooled  lima beans are an excellent addition to green salads.  You can eat lima beans fresh in their pods in the summer, but only if you have a vegetable garden.

Try this great recipe with your fresh harvested lima beans.

Satay Lima Beans in Peanut SauceSatay Lima Beans in Peanut Sauce

Sauce:

1 (10 ounce) can coconut milk

1/2 cup crunchy peanut butter

1/2 small onion, grated

1 tablespoon dark soy sauce

2 teaspoons brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine coconut milk, peanut butter, onion, soy sauce, brown sugar, and pepper flakes. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Remove from heat, and keep warm.

If you are allergic to peanuts, use almond butter instead.

Next dice up one each of a green and red sweet pepper, and one small white onion, and set aside. Chop a bunch of  your choice of chard or kale, and mix with the sweet peppers, white onion, and 16 ounces of cooked lima beans in a large bowl. Next add the warm satay sauce, mix until well coated. Plate and serve.

Enjoy this recipe as a warm salad, side dish, main protein dish, and even as a vegan dish.

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Oriental Chicken Wraps

Oriental Chicken Wraps

Do you want a slow, steady energy supply?  Would you like to prevent chronic disease? Eating the recommended three servings per day of this food has been shown to reduce heart disease by 28 percent, stroke by 36 percent and type II diabetes by 30 percent.

Substituting this food 3 times a day for its processed counterpart will help you manage hunger, eat less and ultimately maintain your weight.

You eat to derive energy from protein and carbohydrates you eat, right? You need to eat this food with its fiber intact as it has Manganese, and it plays a key role in the synthesis of fatty acids to receive that energy you’re looking for when you eat.

What is it, you ask with enthusiasm? It’s 100% whole wheat, and brown rice, and here is a recipe from Splendid Recipes and More that will provide you with 1 of those 3 servings per day, plus your Manganese for energy: Oriental Chicken Wraps.

Here is what you will need.

ingredients-for-Oriental-Chicken-Wraps

 

8 (7-8 inches) whole wheat tortillas

1 cup frozen string green beans

1 cup frozen mix peas and carrots

1 cup brown rice, cooked

1 lg. chicken breast, cooked and cut into small chunks

2 green onions, diced

2 cups chicken broth, no salt added

1/2 cup peanut sauce

diced-cut-chicken-breast-and-diced-green-onions-and-heating-tortillas

Dice two green onions and chop chicken breast into 1 inch pieces and set aside.  Heat oven to 300 degrees. Wrap tortillas in foil and warm for 10 minutes. Shown here in the image, we are using our counter top Nuwave oven. Cook rice according to package instructions with 1 cup of chicken broth and 1 cup water.

 

with-slotted-spoon-spoon-chicken-and-vegetables-to-large-bowl

In a small sauce pan bring 1 cup chicken broth to boiling. Add frozen vegetables and turn heat to low. Simmer 2 to 3 minutes. Just allowing vegetables to thaw out and warm up. Turn off heat and set aside. Next add chopped chicken breast to a large frying pan over medium heat. Cook chicken until no longer pink and cooked through.

Spoon the warmed vegetables to a medium boil along with the cooked chicken pieces.

 

adding-diced-green-onions

Next add cooked chicken, rice and vegetables to a large bowl.  Add green onions, and mix till well incorporated.

spread-peanut-sauce-on-warm-tortilla

Next, spread peanut sauce on one side of warm tortilla. Fold in half, roll up into a cone shape and fill with chicken mixture.

serving-a-plate-of-Oriental-Chicken-Wraps

 

Plate and serve. Serve with additional peanut sauce, if desired.

 

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Thai Chicken with Linguini

Thai Chicken with Linguini

Another Asian dish from the kitchen of Splendid Recipes and More. I actually came up with this recipe when I was out to lunch one day at the Cheesecake Factory. If I recall on their menu it said”Thai Chicken and Liguini.” They were selling a plate for about $10 or $12. In your own kitchen you can make this recipe to serve 4 to 6 plates for under $3.00 each.

Here is what you will need.

16 oz. linguini cooked

4 lbs. chicken breast

2 cups carrots, cut Julianne style

2 cups celery, cut Julianne style

2 cloves garlic, minced

4 tbsp. avocado oil

1 cup hot peanut sauce (see end of article for home-made peanut sauce)

1 cup peanuts, unsalted

 

Most Asian recipes call for vegetables cut Julianne style or on the diagonal. Vegetables cut this way take less time to cook as more surface area is exposed to the heat source. Vegetables cook faster, leaving them crunchy and most of the nutrition is not cooked out.

Here is an illustration of a very easy way to cut carrots Julianne style.

First wash your carrot. From left to right (image), cut the carrot into 1.5 to 2 inch sections. Square the carrot, by thinly slicing outer skin of carrot. Next cut squared carrot into 4 slices. Then cut each slice into match sticks (about 4 slices).

cutting carrot Julianne style

To cut your celery Julianne style is about the same. But there is no need to square the celery or remove the outer skin.

cutting celery Julianne style

Wash celery and then cut into 1.5 to 2 inch sections. Next face rounded side of celery up and slice down the middle. With each section, cut into about 4 match sticks.

Most people though do not like to contend with the stringy part of the celery. Even though the celery is cut Julianne style, you can still have strings, though much smaller. This is how I like to cut my celery, at an angle. There is no strings to contend with, using this cut.

cutting celery at an angle

Cutting the celery in this way, also exposes more surface to the heat source and cooking the celery fast, and leaving it crunchy.

Now on to preparing Thai Chicken with Linguini.

Cook the pasta according to package instructions.

Cut each chicken breast into ¼ inch chunks. In a large frying pan; heat oil. Add minced garlic and sauté. Add vegetables and sauté until tender and then add chicken and cook until pink is gone.

Pour about ½ cup of peanut sauce into pan over chicken and vegetable mixture and mix in well.  Add peanuts mix some more and add the final ½ cup peanut sauce and mix. Remove from pan and put onto a large serving dish.

close-up of Thai Chicken with Linguini

Plate and serve.

Home -made Peanut Sauce

1 13.5 oz. can unsweetened coconut milk, full fat

¼ cup red curry paste

¾ cup natural creamy peanut butter, no sugar added

½ tbsp. salt

¾ cup sugar

2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar or white vinegar

½ cup water

Mix everything into a medium sauce pan and bring to a soft boil over medium heat. Wisk while the ingredients are coming to a boil. Do this for about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and use in the recipe. Let the rest cool down, place in a jar with a tight fitting lid and refrigerate, should last about 4 months. The sauce will thicken, to loosen or make saucy again, place jar into a small pot of boiling water.

Buy your peanut butter fresh ground at your local market. This way there is no peanut or other seed oil used. These types of oils (omega-6) cause inflammation within your body.

 

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