Honey Mustard Salmon Salad

Honey Mustard Salmon Salad on a green platter with gluten free crackers Rich salmon with slightly sweet garlic mustard, and local raw honey. There’s crunchy vegetables included that makes this fresh salad a more flavorful one than tuna salad. Children, teens, and adults alike will enjoy it on some crackers, or as a sandwich. We enjoyed our “Honey Mustard Salmon Salad” with some crackers made from red, yellow, and green lentil flour.

Wild caught salmon is in season from April through November, during which time you can find it fresh at your local markets and it is the least expensive. Wild salmon not only provides exceptional flavor and nutrition found in few other foods, but is easy to prepare and enjoyed even by those who are not always fond of fish (WHF).

Skinning and Boning A Salmon Fillet

Though we used canned salmon from The Whole Foods Market, you can use fresh cooked salmon as well.

If you happen to buy some with the skin still on and you wish to remove it and not really sure how to do it, just follow these instructions from The World’s Healthiest Foods – Salmon Bones and Skin Removed.

salmon-skinned-deboned

GIF credit: Worlds Healthiest Foods

Start with a sharp knife and hold one edge of the filet with your fingers and slide the knife between the skin and meat at about a 45° angle facing the edge of the blade toward the skin.

Position the blade so that the fish is in the middle. Do not move your knife back and forth, but rather move the salmon back and forth on your knife blade holding the skin.

Keep the edge of  the knifes blade at an angle so it cuts between the meat and skin without cutting through the skin.

To remove the bones, run your fingers over the top of the fish too find a line of bones. Remove them one at a time with a pair of tweezers, pliers, or your fingers. Pull them out going with the grain of the fish so they slide out without tearing the meat.

It takes some practice, but with a sharp knife it can actually be quite easy.

Bears Enjoy Salmon To

We would say that this recipe has been kitchen tested, and is budget friendly. Here is what you will need to prepare your own Honey Mustard Salmon Salad.

4 tablespoons sweet garlic mustard (found at Whole foods Market)

4 tablespoons plain yogurt (we used a homemade yogurt)

2 tablespoons local raw honey

2 – 6 ounce cans Alaskan Wild Salmon, drained

1 small red bell pepper, diced

2 celery stalks, sliced thin

1/2 cup white onion, diced

ingredients for Honey Mustard Salmon SaladIn a large bowl, mix together mustard, yogurt, and honey. Add salmon, red bell pepper, celery, and onion.

mixing in honey - Honey Mustard Salmon SaladStir together until mixed.

Honey Mustard Salmon Salad - close upPlace the Honey Mustard Salmon Salad in the center of a serving platter and surround the fish mixture with your favorite crackers, and serve.

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Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils

Prosciutto Cotto and LentilsLentils have 18 grams of protein per serving, making them the third highest level of protein than any other plant food. Garbanzo beans and wheat berries both have 12 grams of protein per serving.

types of lentilsOut of all the varieties that are grown for consumption, the French Green Lentils are considered the most flavorful, having a delicate peppery taste.

They originated in Puy, France, though today they are also grown in Canada (highest production) Italy and the United States.

The French variety lentil hold their shape well while only taking about 30 to 40 minutes to cook.

On New Year’s Eve in Italy people eat “lenticchie stufate” or in a soup. Why? This is an old symbol of good luck in the Italian tradition, because of their round shape, which resembles coins. They say the more you eat, the more wealth that comes to you.

Our featured recipe contains French Green Lentils, and here is what you well need to prepare your own Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils.

diced vegetables for Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils

Real Whole Food Nutrition

2 medium stalks celery, diced

2 medium yellow carrots, diced

1 small sweet potato, peeled and diced

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 small red onion chopped

1/2 cup tomato paste

4 1/2 cups broth, your choice beef – chicken – vegetable

3/4 pound prosciutto cotto – about 2 slices 1/2 inch cut, cut into 1/2 inch x 1/2 inch squares

3 tablespoons olive oil

3 tablespoons avocado oil

In a large soup pot over medium heat, add olive oil and minced garlic – sauté until fragrant.

adding vegetables to garlicNext add prepared onion – carrots and sweet potato and mix together.

adding lentils and tomato paste Next add rinsed lentils and mix in. Then add tomato paste and stir being sure ever lentil is coated.

adding brothAdd broth, place lid on pot and simmer 30 minutes or until lentils are cooked.

After 30 minutes there will be only about 1 cup or so of broth – drain and set aside – leave lentil mixture in soup pot.

warming avocado oil and pork fatIn a warm pan with avocado oil add some prosciutto fat with prepare prosciutto cotto and sauté in oil until meat is warmed.

We used refined high heat (to 550 degrees) avocado oil, which has no flavor, therefore not contaminating or changing the smoked flavor of the prosciutto cotto.

Remove meat and mix with lentil mixture.

Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils - close upSpoon Prosciutto Cotto and Lentils to a platter and serve.

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Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo Soup

Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo

When the suns behind the winter clouds and not able to warm your skin, the next best thing is Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo Soup.

The cannellini beans or white beans are also known as white Italian kidney beans. The skin of the white kidney beans are much thinner and more delicate than their red cousins. White beans also have a smooth, but slightly nutty tasting interior.

Concerned about your daily fiber in take? A half cup serving of cooked cannellini beans are a excellent source of dietary fiber, providing you with 7 grams of your 30 grams of fiber needed daily for good health.

Here is what you will need for this simple and nutritious Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo Soup.

Our ingredients are all organic grown and harvested and pasture fed meat.

red kale2 tablespoons avocado oil

12 ounces pork chorizo sausage, 1-inch slices

1 medium red onion, diced

3 gloves garlic, minced

1 medium purple carrot, diced

1 rib celery, diced

4 cups chicken stock

2 15 ounce cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

1 teaspoon Himalayan salt optional

4 cups red kale, stemmed and leaves torn

spooning from the sauce pot - Red Kale Cannellini Beans and ChorizoOver medium heat, add oil to a large sauce pot. Once heated add meat and brown. Next add onions, and garlic. Stir until garlic and onion is just browned about 1 minute.

Next add diced carrots and celery, and stir until you see the vegetables brighten in color, about 2 minutes. Next add chicken broth, beans and salt.

a large sauce pot of Red Kale Cannellini Beans and ChorizoBring to a boil, then lower heat to a simmer, and add kale, then stir in. Place lid on pot, and on simmer let soup cook another 5 minutes.

Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo - close upTo thicken the soup a little, as we did not use potatoes (their starch content will thicken soups), you can add some arrowroot starch. In a small glass add 1 tablespoon of starch and stir in a teaspoon of fresh water, and add when soup is boiling. When soup has thickened some, lower heat to a simmer. Add kale and stir in, then place lid on soup pot and let cook another 5 minutes.

Red Kale Cannellini Beans and Chorizo

According to Mangia Bene Pasta, the Cannellini beans are difficult to harvest when ripe and therefore are harvested in the fall when the pod is completely dry.  As a result, the beans are rarely eaten fresh.

In some parts of Italy, the beans are a popular accompaniment to tuna and pasta dishes containing poultry. In the United States, vegetarians often utilize the hearty beans as a fish or chicken substitute, due to its protein source (WiseGeek).

The dried beans double in size when soaked, so a few beans go a long way in a dish.  Cannellini beans are available in supermarkets in both dried and canned form. If cannellini beans are unavailable, great northern beans or navy beans can be used, though they are a much smaller bean.

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Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Don’t toss the food scrapes just yet! You can still use them to make or prepare something you may never given any thought too.

Watermelon Rinds

Watermelon rind has nutritional benefits. It contain vitamin-C and vitamin B-6, both great for skin, immunity, and the nervous system. Here’s something that maybe a surprise to you the rinds may help your sex life. A 2008 study at Texas A&M University research reported that watermelon rinds have high concentrations of a compound called citrulline, which the body converts into an amino acid that helps improve circulation and relax blood vessels.

After cutting up a watermelon save those rinds and blend them into a fruit smoothie, or try using them in a stir-fry. The rinds when cooked have a zucchini-like texture, with a slightly sweeter flavor.

Banana Peels

A 2013 study found that around 40 million tons of banana peels are thrown in the trash and go unused worldwide. Did you know you can use the peels to heal wounds, just rub the pulp side on bruises and scrapes to deliver potassium to heal the wound.  Soak the peels in a jar of water, for a few days, then mix five parts water to one part banana-water, and fertilize your potted plants .

The Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2011) wrote that banana peels contain carotenoids and polyphenols, which are thought to help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Wash the peel in water then blend into a fruit smoothie. India boasts a dry vegetable curry using chopped banana peels boiled with turmeric powder and salt, then mixed with other ingredients, such as mustard seeds, green chilies, and cabbage.

Sweet Potato Peelings

After peeling a sweet potato, use the peels help lighten those persistent dark circles under the eyes. Even some have used the peels as a remedy to fad away freckles and age spots o the skin. It’s the enzyme called catecholase in the potatoes that give the peelings of the sweet potato this ability.

Stale Bread

Stale bread has always been used to make crumbs or croutons But did you can know you can run stale bread through your spice or coffee grinders to remove any leftover odors or residue?

If you have smudges or marks on the walls, including crayon marks, stale bread can help. First remove the crust, then wipe the marks or smudges with a soft cloth, then rub semi-stale bread against it. The sponge like texture will work like a store bought cleaning eraser.

Onion Skin‘s

The wrapping around onions is rich in the nutrient quercetin, a plant pigment that helps to prevent your arteries from clogging, and helping with lowering blood sugar, and reducing inflammation.

A 2011 study reported that in the European Union alone, around 500,000 tons of onion skins go to waist each year. Though the onion skin is not palatable, you can reap the health benefits by tossing the onion skins into beef, chicken or vegetable broth while cooking soups and stews. The out come will be a rich, flavorful soup. Don’t for get to remove the skin before serving.

Olive Oil

Do you have a bottle of olive oil that has lost its fragrant taste? Will don’t toss it. There are still ways to use it.

Do you have a pair of paints that has a zipper that just won’t budge? Dab some oilve oil on the teeth of the zipper to make it zip again. You can even use it to wipe off eye makeup. Surprised? Just try it and see for yourself.

Other uses include rubbing into the leaves of potted plants to make them shine and look healthier, or even use to polish your leather shoes.

Swiss Chard Stalks

Those of us that use Swiss chard, always toss the stalks, but wait, German researchers reported that the stalks contain glutamine an amino acid , which boosts the immune system, and can also aid the body to recover from surgery and heal wounds.

Cut the stalks into one-inch cubes, roast for about 20 minutes, and season with lemon juice, chopped garlic, salt, and pepper. Add a whole Swiss chard (stalks included) to the blender for a powerful boost to your green juice or smoothie.

If none of the for gone ideas sound appealing to you, you can toss those scrapes into a mulch bend to add to the soil in your garden. Even if you don’t garden, give your scrapes off to a friend who does, or to your local community garden.

 

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Spicy Chorizo and Bean Soup

Spicy Chorizo and Bean Soup

When we were living down in Mexico, I learned to love chorizo. That was a time before we all knew what processed foods were really doing to us. But since a few years ago, we have learned to eat healthy, and we really try to walk that road. Though you can splurge a little now and again. That piece of so wanted “Double Fudge Cake” is okay to eat.

The point I guess I am trying to make, is chorizo isn’t really good for you. It’s really overly greasy, and a heart attack waiting to happen. But today we splurged, we had been saving up, and the chorizo was our piece of “Double Fudge Cake.”

There can be some good to say about that chorizo though, and here it is.

The Mexican style chorizo in this soup provides 24.1 grams of protein per 3.5 ounce serving, and because chorizo is made from animal sources — beef and pork — it contributes essential amino acids required for tissue repair and food breakdown. One serving of chorizo sausage (3.5 oz.) contains 0.6 mg of thiamine, or vitamin B-1. The thiamine in this food allows your body to more effectively use certain amino acids, and it helps convert food to energy.

To boost your intake of this vitamin even more, serve chorizo with a side of lentils, pinto beans or black beans. The 3.5 oz. serving of chorizo also has 2 mcg of vitamin B-12, a nutrient that plays an important role in nerve function.  A serving of chorizo contains 21.1 mcg of selenium, a significant portion of the suggested intake of 55 mcg per day. The selenium available in the sausage creates antioxidants, which ward off damage often triggered by free radicals.

Here is what you will need to prepare the soup that is very nutritious and sure to warm your insides:

ingredients for Spicy Chorizo and Bean Soup

1 large white onion, finely sliced

2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

1 tsp. of smoked paprika

2 celery stalks, cut into fine slices

2 roman tomatoes, quartered and cut into chunks

1-16 oz. can pinto beans, drained

Black pepper

4 cups chicken stock

½ lb. beef chorizo, torn into small chunks

2 tbsp. of olive oil

chopped tomatoes, onion, celery and garlic

First dice the onions and celery. Then quarter and chop the tomatoes, and mince garlic. Set all of that aside.

pulling apart beef chorizo with hands

Remove the casing from the chorizo and pull it apart into small pieces.

frying beef chorizo

In a medium stock pot over medium-high heat, heat 1 tbsp. olive oil. When heated, add chorizo and fry until crisp about 2 to 4 minutes.

soaking up fat from chorizo

Using a slotted spoon, spoon out chorizo onto a paper towel lined plate, and set aside.

adding tomatoes

Lower the heat to medium and add 1 tablespoon of olive oil and heat. Now add the chopped onion, and celery. Fry while stirring until tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. Next add chopped garlic and smoked paprika and mix in well, frying another 1 to 2 minutes. Add chopped tomatoes and mix in well.Fry for another minute.

adding beef broth

Next add the beef stock and chorizo. Bring to a boil, turn heat down, and simmer for 10 minutes.

adding pinto beans

Next add drained pinto beans, and cook for about 5 minutes.

Serve warm in soup bowls and spoon sour cream on top and sprinkled with chopped cilantro.

What’s your favorite not so healthy food to splurge with now and again?

 

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Smoked Turkey, Black Bean, Bell Pepper and Corn Salad

Smoked Turkey, Black Bean, Bell Pepper and Corn Salad

This is an easy dinner idea in just 20 minutes. It is one of my “Salad as a Main Course” recipe because of mixing a meat with the leafy greens and other vegetables.

This meal is packed with antioxidants, minerals and vitamins.

This salad contains…

.52 g of protein

.13 g of total fat

.73 g of carbohydrates

.3 g of fiber

.41 g of natural sugars

It is low in salt, high in fiber, and cholesterol-free.

All of this in just one cup of what is in this meal: Arugula. The flavor of Arugula is peppery and  pungent. The salad also includes mint, lemon juice, orange bell pepper and all the rest that is in this fast and simple meal idea…you can’t go wrong with preparing and eating it.

Recipe:

Smoked Turkey, Black Bean, Bell Pepper and Corn Salad

3 cups (about 3/4 pound) diced, cooked smoked turkey breast

1 can (15.5 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained

1 1/2 cups fresh corn kernels

1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved

1 cup diced bell peppers (any colors)

1/2 cup finely chopped red onion

3 cups arugula

Dressing

1/2 cup chopped fresh mint (plus leaves for garnish)

1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic

1/2 cup tomato juice

2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon sherry (or balsamic) vinegar

1 tablespoon olive oil

Combine turkey, beans, corn, tomatoes, bell peppers and onion in a bowl. Whisk all dressing ingredients in another bowl. Add dressing to turkey mixture and toss to combine. Divide arugula among 4 plates and top with turkey salad.

For more information about how food correlates to a healthy you visit: Health News Library

 

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Traditional Mexican Sopes

Traditional Mexican sope header

The traditional sope is a recipe from Mexico. Through out Mexico (depending on the reign) sopes are prepared, using local ingredients and adding salsas and toppings, resulting in great regional variety.

The distinctive characteristic of the sope is the pinched sides. Though there are also flat sopes resembling a thick tortilla or a tostada. The most common variation of the sope involves simply adding meat, the most common being chicken and is known as the  “sope de pollo”. In the northern regions of Mexico, sopes are often prepared without vegetables, and substituting meat for black beans.

Here is our version of the Traditional Mexican Sope and what you will need:

For the base you will need

1 cup all-purpose unbleached flour

2 cup masa (corn) flour (you can find this in the Latin section of your market or a local Latin Market)

1 cup warm water

kneading flour, corn masa and water together

Place flour and masa in large bowl, and mix together. Make a well in center of flour mix and gradually add water, kneading until smooth.

Form dough into small balls

Form dough into 16 small balls.

mexican tortilla press

With a Mexican tortilla press, place one ball of dough at a time between two pieces of waxed paper and press into 3-inch round patty. If you don’t have a press, use a pie pin roller, placing one ball of dough at a time between two pieces of waxed paper, rolling pie pin over ball into a 3-inch round patty.

cooking sopes in avocado oil

Next, add oil to a large skillet over medium-high and heat for 1 to 2 minutes. Cook patties for 3 minutes on each side or until golden brown, adding additional oil as needed to prevent sticking.

pinching sides of sopes

Allow sopes to cool for 2 to 3 minutes. Next place fingers of both hands on patty, with fingers on the patty and the thumbs on the edge. With a circular motion, pinch the edges of the patty up ¼ inch.

 

Now for the toppings:

1 (16-ounce) can black beans, warmed

1/8 cup avocado oil

8 oz. mild salsa

2 cups shredded green lettuce or dark greens

2 medium tomatoes, diced

1 medium avocado, peeled and sliced

1 cup sour cream

1 cup crumbled Mexican Cotija cheese

smashing black beans

Place black beans in a heated medium skillet. Heat beans thoroughly. Place heated beans into a large bowl and while hot smash beans with a potato smasher or equivalent.

traditional topping for Mexican Sopes

Prepare the other toppings according to ingredient, amount and preparation above. The image shows a bowl of radishes. I just love to eat radishes with my Mexican meals. when I lived in Mexico, I always bought hand tacos at local taco stands. While you were waiting you could munch on prepared vegetables they had sitting out, and radishes was one of them.

Top each sope  first with black beans

Now, top each sope with black beans.

Traditional Mexican Sopes

Add the other toppings in this order: lettuce, sour cream, tomatoes, salsa, Cotija, avocado slice, and more salsa if desired.  ! Buen Provecho! That’s Spanish for Enjoy!

 

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