Sugar Snap Peas with Tarragon

Sugar Snap Peas with TarragonFresh tarragon has an intense flavor over dried tarragon. When the herb is dried the oils dissipate.

You can store tarragon from 3 to 5 months in the freezer, doing so retains the most flavor of fresh tarragon during sprig of tarragonstorage. There is no need to defrost the herb before using it. Dried tarragon should be kept in a sealed container in a cool, dark place and used within 1 year.

Heat greatly intensifies the flavor of tarragon.

Though is may not look like it, tarragon is a species of perennial herb in the sunflower family.

There are variations of the herb and they include “French tarragon“, which is best used for culinary purposes, “Russian tarragon”, typically better than wild tarragon but not as good as the French tarragon, and “wild tarragon”.

Flavor

If you are wondering what the flavor of tarragon is, we would describe it as slightly peppery and it has a taste that’s somewhat similar to fennel, anise or licorice.

Health Benefits

Tarragon has great health benefits. It contains trace amounts of minerals including iron, potassium, and small amounts of calcium. It also contains vitamin-A, a nutrient essential for healthy eyes. This is herb is one of the recommendations to reduce your risk of macular degeneration.

Our featured recipe also includes:

Cilantro: contains trace minerals and vitamin-A

Shallots: Part of the allium family, which includes onions, garlic and scallions. Shallots also help to ward off cancer. They also contain 34 micrograms of folate, which is good for brain and nerve function.

Sugar Snap Peas:  They are a good source of vitamin-C, a nutrient that protects DNA structures from damage and improves the immune system. The sugar snaps also contain folate, which helps to improve heart health. Low levels of folate can raise levels of homocysteine, which increases the risk of heart disease.

Folic acid is a synthetic form of folate. If you are taking the B-vitamin as a supplement, it is recommended to take the natural form, folate. As noted folic acid is a synthetic oxidized form, and is not found in fresh natural foods as is folate. Because it is synthetic, is not bio-available to the body, as is folate.

Now for our featured recipe – Sugar Snap Peas with Tarragon – and here is what you will need.

1 pound sugar snap peas

1 shallot, diced

2 tablespoons butter

1/2 to 1 teaspoon tarragon, chopped

1/2 teaspoon cilantro, chopped

Himalayan salt and pepper to taste (optional)

cooking sugar snap peasIn a large sauce pot, bring water to a rapid boil, and add snap peas and cook until they turn bright green, about 3 minutes. Drain, and set aside.

chopped fresh herbs and shallotsMean time, prepare the tarragon, cilantro, and shallots.

In a large ceramic coated skillet over medium heat, add butter and melt. Next add shallots and cook until soft, about  3 minutes. Next whisk in a splash of fresh water, about 1 to 2 tablespoons, then add snap peas and cook 2 to 3 minutes. Next add chopped tarragon, cilantro, and mix in with snap peas and shallots.

Sugar Snap Peas with TarragonSpoon cooked sugar snap pea mixture into a serving bowl, and serve with your favorite main dish.

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Melon Berry Fruit Salad with a Mint-Lime Dressing

Melon Berry Fruit Salad

Orgainc WatermelonYou know summer has officially started when you can make yourself a fruit salad with in season fresh fruits.

Thanks to our friends to the south (Mexico) and their sub-tropical weather, we can have watermelon before it is even harvests here in the U.S.A.

Watermelon is  a perfect summer fruit to grow, harvest, and eat as it is a wonderful and juicy hydrating fruit.

Sliced cross section of a seedless organic watermelonAs you sweat on a hot summer day, while at the beach, working in the garden, or just taking an afternoon walk, you lose vital electrolytes, which includes sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium, and watermelon is a better chose to re-hydrate, than Gatorade.

Watermelon is all natural, and has the right balance of the electrolytes needed to keep your heart beating, and to replace the water needed to keep you cool.

Our feature fruit salad includes watermelon and here is what you will need to prepare the Melon Berry Fruit Salad with a Mint-Lime Dressing.

1/2 a seedless watermelon

1 cantaloupe

6 ounces raspberries

6 ounces blueberries

6 ounces blackberries

zest and juice of one lime

2 tablespoons raw honey

1 tablespoon water or watermelon juice

1 tablespoon mint leaves, minced

6-10 mint leaves, for garnishing, optional

Mint-Lime Dressing

watermelon juiceUse a melon ball scoop to create bite size pieces of both melons. A the melon to a large bowl. Next add the berries to the melon. Toss gently, so as not to crush the berries.

In a small bowl , combine the zest and lime juice, honey, water, and minced mint leaves. We used the juice of the watermelon in place of water.

Drizzle dressing over mixed fruit salad to coat.

Use the remaining mint leaves to garnish the salad.

Melon Berry Fruit Salad with a Mint-Lime Dressing

Cover and chill for 1 to 2 hours before serving.

Before serving gently mix the fruit again to coat with any juice and dressing that may have gathered at the bottom of the bowl.

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Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa with Prosciutto Wrapped Vegetables

Do you know the difference between farmed fish and wild ocean caught fish, in particularly salmon? We wanted to know the answer, so we reasearch it, and here is what we found.

Farmed fish is a $1 billion a year revenue (USA), with salmon being number one.

Farmed salmon has less area in which to grow and thrive, and their bodies are much fattier than wild salmon, and have less omega-3 fatty acids.

They are fed processed fish oil and fish meal or a high fat feed, which is not the typical food wild salmon eat.

The flesh of farmed salmon are greyish in color due to their diet. Food coloring is added after harvesting to give farmed salmon the pinkish color that wild caught salmon have naturally.

Health Problems Associated with Farmed Salmon

 fish farm cage in Norwegian SeaFish farm cage in Norwegian Sea

Farmed salmon contain more unhealthy omega-6 fatty acids, and higher lipid levels (Lipid Composition in Farmed and Wild Salmon), raising the risk of inflammation, which is  associated with heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and other health problems.

Farmed salmon are given antibiotics and in some cases growth hormones, which also gets into the water supply, and can affect other wild marian creatures.

As of 2013 AquaBounty Technologies (US based company) has received approval from the FDA (Genetically Engineered Salmon) to genetically modify farmed salmon.

The one benefit of farmed salmon is they have no mercury in their meat, as they are grown in so-called controlled waters and their lifespan is shorter than in the wild, and wild salmon live longer with higher chances of mercury exposure.

After considering the research, it appears to us here at Splendid Recipes and More, that wild caught salmon is clearly more natural and nutritious over  its farm grown counterpart.

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Now for our featured recipe and here is what you will need.

The recipe makes four (4) servings, so you will need four salmon filets that are de-boned. When shopping for the ingredients to make the salsa, be sure to purchase one each of red sweet pepper (bell pepper), mango, serrano chili, small lime, and one bunch of green onions (Scallions). You will also need 2 medium peaches (frozen are ok if fresh peaches are not in season).

2 medium peaches, peeled, deseeded, chopped

1 large mango, peeled, deseeded, chopped

½ cup green onions, diced (about 3 scallions)

½ red bell pepper, diced

1 Serrano pepper, deseeded and minced

½ tsp. salt

1 tbsp. sugar (we used coconut sugar)

Juice from one half of a lime

Optional: ½ cup cilantro, chopped

chopped and diced produce for Peach and Mango Salsa

Prepare peaches and mango. Place into a medium mixing bowl along with the diced onion and red bell pepper. Do not mix. Next add Serrano pepper and optional to add chopped cilantro, again, do not mix.

Peach and Mango Salsa - close-up

squeeze out lime juice with the back of a spoon Squeeze out lime juice with the back of a spoon

 Together add salt, coconut sugar and lime juice. Stir mixture until well incorporated.

Let mixture set for 15 minutes at room temperature for flavors to infuse, or refrigerate until ready to eat.

Wild Salmon with Peach Mango Salsa

Prepare salmon, by grilling, baking, or broiling. Plate your salmon and top with the salsa. The recipe for the side dish of vegetables to be posted.

Peach and Mango Salsa

The salsa can keep in a jar with a tight lid for 2-3 days in the refrigerator, or can be frozen for later use.

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Purple Sweet Potato Cashew and Chicken Salad

Purple Sweet Potato Cashew and Chicken Salad

This recipe brings together flavors for an exciting salad as a main dinner selection. It features the sweet purple potato which roasts up very tasty, along with cashews, tender baby kale, chicken breast, and an all organic balsamic dressing purchased at the Whole Foods Market. It is a non-oil dressing that is gluten free, vegan friendly, and non-dairy. The main dressing ingredients includes blackberries, figs, and aged balsamic vinegar.

Let’s get to cooking and enjoy the video.

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Organic Rainbow Carrots and Spinach Salad

Rainbow Carrots and Spinach Salad

It is said, but cannot be proven, that the orange carrot was cultivated in the 17th century by Dutch growers. It is thought that the carrot was cultivated orange as a tribute to William of Orange, who led the the struggle for Dutch independence.

Whatever the origin of the orange carrot, the Long Orange Dutch carrot, first written about in 1721, is the forebear of the orange Horn carrot varieties so abundant at supermarkets today.

History states the first mention of growing carrots was in Iran. Carrots cultivated before 1721 were of different colors, like purple, red, yellow and white. The orange carrot we buy today is crossed from the later two colors, yellow and white.

It is note worthy, the nutritional benefits of rainbow carrots. Four (4) ounces or 1/2 a cup has 157% of the daily value of vitamin-A, 14% of the daily need of vitamin-C, 337 mg of potassium, and 3% of the daily need of calcium, and iron. Four ounces also have about 3 grams of fiber.

Our featured recipe is prepared using wild organic rainbow carrots. It is a simple and delicious salad. Fast and easy to make. Our featured salad, Organic Rainbow Carrots and Spinach Salad will need the following.

Organic Rainbow Carrots and Spinach Salad

2 cups cooked organic rainbow carrots, sliced

3-4 cups baby spinach

1/4 cup Asiago cheese, shredded

Ginger syrup

Olive oil

Caribbean Spiced Rubbed Beef Rib SteakWash and slice carrots, but do not peel. Place into a steamer basket over boiling water and steam, about 5 minutes. Cool and set aside.

Plate spinach on a large salad plate. Top with cooled carrots. Drizzle ginger syrup over vegetables, then drizzle olive oil. Top with cheese.

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We enjoyed the salad with a Caribbean Spiced Rubbed Beef Rib Steak and slices of olive bread.

 

 

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Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Food Parts That Are Still Surprisingly Useful

Don’t toss the food scrapes just yet! You can still use them to make or prepare something you may never given any thought too.

Watermelon Rinds

Watermelon rind has nutritional benefits. It contain vitamin-C and vitamin B-6, both great for skin, immunity, and the nervous system. Here’s something that maybe a surprise to you the rinds may help your sex life. A 2008 study at Texas A&M University research reported that watermelon rinds have high concentrations of a compound called citrulline, which the body converts into an amino acid that helps improve circulation and relax blood vessels.

After cutting up a watermelon save those rinds and blend them into a fruit smoothie, or try using them in a stir-fry. The rinds when cooked have a zucchini-like texture, with a slightly sweeter flavor.

Banana Peels

A 2013 study found that around 40 million tons of banana peels are thrown in the trash and go unused worldwide. Did you know you can use the peels to heal wounds, just rub the pulp side on bruises and scrapes to deliver potassium to heal the wound.  Soak the peels in a jar of water, for a few days, then mix five parts water to one part banana-water, and fertilize your potted plants .

The Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2011) wrote that banana peels contain carotenoids and polyphenols, which are thought to help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Wash the peel in water then blend into a fruit smoothie. India boasts a dry vegetable curry using chopped banana peels boiled with turmeric powder and salt, then mixed with other ingredients, such as mustard seeds, green chilies, and cabbage.

Sweet Potato Peelings

After peeling a sweet potato, use the peels help lighten those persistent dark circles under the eyes. Even some have used the peels as a remedy to fad away freckles and age spots o the skin. It’s the enzyme called catecholase in the potatoes that give the peelings of the sweet potato this ability.

Stale Bread

Stale bread has always been used to make crumbs or croutons But did you can know you can run stale bread through your spice or coffee grinders to remove any leftover odors or residue?

If you have smudges or marks on the walls, including crayon marks, stale bread can help. First remove the crust, then wipe the marks or smudges with a soft cloth, then rub semi-stale bread against it. The sponge like texture will work like a store bought cleaning eraser.

Onion Skin‘s

The wrapping around onions is rich in the nutrient quercetin, a plant pigment that helps to prevent your arteries from clogging, and helping with lowering blood sugar, and reducing inflammation.

A 2011 study reported that in the European Union alone, around 500,000 tons of onion skins go to waist each year. Though the onion skin is not palatable, you can reap the health benefits by tossing the onion skins into beef, chicken or vegetable broth while cooking soups and stews. The out come will be a rich, flavorful soup. Don’t for get to remove the skin before serving.

Olive Oil

Do you have a bottle of olive oil that has lost its fragrant taste? Will don’t toss it. There are still ways to use it.

Do you have a pair of paints that has a zipper that just won’t budge? Dab some oilve oil on the teeth of the zipper to make it zip again. You can even use it to wipe off eye makeup. Surprised? Just try it and see for yourself.

Other uses include rubbing into the leaves of potted plants to make them shine and look healthier, or even use to polish your leather shoes.

Swiss Chard Stalks

Those of us that use Swiss chard, always toss the stalks, but wait, German researchers reported that the stalks contain glutamine an amino acid , which boosts the immune system, and can also aid the body to recover from surgery and heal wounds.

Cut the stalks into one-inch cubes, roast for about 20 minutes, and season with lemon juice, chopped garlic, salt, and pepper. Add a whole Swiss chard (stalks included) to the blender for a powerful boost to your green juice or smoothie.

If none of the for gone ideas sound appealing to you, you can toss those scrapes into a mulch bend to add to the soil in your garden. Even if you don’t garden, give your scrapes off to a friend who does, or to your local community garden.

 

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Mushroom Tortellini with Asparagus

Mushroom Tortellini with Asparagus

The medical journal, “American Medical Association” publish  in 2010 based on a study that found vitamin B-6 when combined with folate ( not folac acid, the inferior form, a synthetic form) and methionine ( an amino acid, also found in meat, chicken, fish, eggs, garlic, onions, legums, and some dairy) can reduce the chances of lung cancer by as much as two-thirds. Asparagus contains both of these vitamins, and including the amino acid methionine.

More great news of the vegetable asparagus is it contains saponins which helps to fight inflammation, and can help with arthritis and rheumatism. It can also help to prevent varicose veins. Ayurvedic medicine has used asparagus for century’s to treat the symptoms of menopause as well as infertility and loss of libido (in both men and women).

The featured recipe also includes vitamins and minerals like vitamin-A, vitamin-C, calcium, and iron. It also has 18% of your daily need of protein 9 grams (daily protein need is 25 grams for woman and 30 grams for men).

Now for our featured recipe, and here is what you will need.

Mushroom Tortellini with Asparagus

1 package cheese tortellini

Pint of cream

¼ cup grated Asiago cheese

5 – 7 asparagus stalks

1 4 oz. can mushrooms

1 cup baby spinach

1/2 tsp. black pepper

 

Asparagus being blanched - Mushroom Tortellini with AsparagusBring a pot of water to boiling. Separately prepare a bowl of cold water with some ice.

Add salt to the boiling water and blanch the asparagus for 2 – 3 minutes until they just start to become tender.

Remove and add asparagus to the cold water to stop the cooking and set the color.

Remove to a paper towel to drain and dice into ½ inch pieces. You could do this ahead of time and keep the prepare asparagus in the refrigerator.

Next bring a pot of water to boil and the tortellini according to package instructions.

While cooking the pasta, heat a large sauté pot over medium heat and add 3/4 of the cream. While the cream is heating continue to stir and allow it to slow reduce, scrap sides of pot if needed.

When the cream has reduced by about 1/3 lower the heat and simmer, about 3 to 4 minutes.

Next add the asiago cheese to the cream, and turn the heat to high, stir in till cheese is melted. Add mushrooms and black pepper, and stir in.

Tortellini should be done now, so quickly drain and add to the cream along with the asparagus and toss to combine.

Place spinach on top of mixture and place a lid over pot, and allow spinach to wilt, about 4 minutes.

If you see the cream sauce to thick and would like it a bit thinner, just add a little more cream a tablespoon at a time till you see the thinness you desire.

Plate paste and garnish with cheese, if desired.

A great addition to this recipe would be roasted pine nuts. You can also 86 the mushrooms if you like, in other words delete them from the recipe (86 is a restaurant term for “out of product”, can also mean, “you’re out of here”).

 

Red Pear and French Bean Salad

Red Pear and French Bean Salad - plated

Red pears have a high concentration of phytonutrient anthocyanin, which has anti-aging properties. This nutrient also promotes heart health and protects against cancer. Read pears are also an excellent source of fiber, vitamin-C, potassium (not as nutrient dense as a banana), and copper.

Red PearsWe know that vitamin-C is needed for tissue growth, promoting healthy collagen, but we don’t hear enough of what copper is good for.

Copper is not just for hot water pipping in our homes, copper the kind that our bodies can assimilate, is necessary for the production of hemoglobin, and collagen as well.

While basil, found in the dressing of our featured recipe, is also great for skin and hair, fighting against some cancers, it also has that its antioxidants and volatile oils are a great assistance to the immune system.

The leaves of the basil, and oil alike, have antibacterial properties. Applied topically to wounds, basil leaves may eliminate bacterial infections, while enjoying basil in food, it can help combat viral infections, including colds, flu, and herpes.

Talking about basil, here is the recipe that will dress the salad, and it includes basil.

Basil Chickpea Miso Vinaigrette

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons chickpea miso, room tempurature

1 cup finely chopped fresh basil leaves

3 cloves garlic, minced

2 teaspoons lemon zest

juice of half a lemon

Basil ChickPea Miso Vinaigrette

Tear basil leaves without steams, and loosely fill one cup. Place oil, vinegar, miso, basil, garlic and lemon zest (we forgot the lemon zest, my bad) in a small jar. Screw lid on tightly and shack well until smooth, making sure miso is dissolved and mixed in well. Set aside.

Here is what you will need for the Red Pear and French Bean Salad.

2 lbs. French green beans, ends trimmed

4 small, ripe but firm red pears, halved and thinly sliced lengthwise ( seed, but do not peel)

1 cup chopped pecans

Wash beans and trim the ends. Cut beans in half. You can blanch the beans or use them raw. Blanch for about 2 minutes in boiling water. Drain and set aside.

Preparing Red Pear and French Bean Salad

Prepare the pears while the beans are blanching. Squeeze the juice of half a lemon into a large bowl. Cut pears using a apple slicer, and slice each wedge one time more. Place all pear slices into bowl with lemon juice, and mix to coat pears with juice. Coating them with lemon juice will prevent the pear flesh from oxidizing or turning brown.

Next, place the pecans and basil vinaigrette into a large mixing bowl. Place pears and beans into bowl and toss to mix well, making sure produce is coated well with vinaigrette.

Red Pear and French Bean Salad - in a serving bowlAfter tossing to coat salad, turn into a large serving bowl.

Red Pear and French Bean Salad - platedPlate and serve.

 

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The Agitators of Good Food

The Agitators of Good Food

A blender or a food processor, even a Magic Bullet or the Ninja Kitchen Blender, are all kitchen aids known to blend or process food ingredients together. They could also be describe as agitators. Is this what we are referring to by the theme of this post? That they are the agitators of good food? Far from it.

The agitators we want to talk about are those that are mixed with spices and herbs to enhance their flavors.

Spices and herbs can enhance any dish from sweet to savory, but it is the agitators which must be used in conjunction with them to have any real effect. What are those agitators? Salt is one of them, but so is vinegar, citric acid and sugar. Sugar by the way is more popular with baking, but has a place at times in cooking.

Zest of lemons and oranges can also be used as an agitator in accompanying some of the spices and herbs to enhance flavor. Lemon zest, or the grated rind, is a popular flavoring for baked goods and desserts as well as in savory dishes, such as meats and sauces.

grating lemon zestThe rind holds the lemon oil, and adds exciting taste. After you have squeezed a lemon for its juice, don’t toss out the rinds, freeze them and use them for zest in anything from desserts, vinaigrette, and vegetable side dishes. Frozen citrus rinds graded for zest are as fresh as a fresh lemon or orange.

Lemon juice can replace or compliment vinegar in salad dressings, or to marinate and tenderize meat, poultry or fish.

Here are some seasonings without salt but have another agitator that can be used in some of our favorite recipes. See if you can guess the agitator being used in them.

Taco Seasoning: chili powder, domestic paprika, granulated onion, cumin, granulated garlic, Mexican oregano, brown sugar, black pepper medium, & cayenne pepper (the agitator is brown sugar).

Garlic Herb Seasoning: sesame seeds, black pepper, garlic powder, green onion, lemon zest and citric acid (the agitators are the zest and citric acid). Citric acid is sold packaged in powder form, and can be purchased at any health food store.

Italian Seasoning:  oregano, red pepper flakes, sweet basil, garlic flakes, parsley flakes.

In the Italian seasoning there is no agitator used. Do we add salt, then? No, but if you add it to spaghetti sauce which has tomatoes in it, then you have your agitator. Tomatoes have citric acid in them.

Pizza Seasoning - The Agitators of Good Food

Pizza Seasoning

Pizza seasoning: oregano, basil, garlic, onion, thyme, fennel seed, red bell pepper, crushed red pepper, parsley and marjoram.

As you can see, there is no agitator used. What does pizza have as part of it ingredients? Tomato sauce, which has citric acid, the agitator.

When using salt as your agitator, use Himalayan salt. Not only will you get a boost of trace minerals in the meal, but you can also use less salt than you would if using table salt.

 

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Enjoying the Benefits of a Fermented Breakfast

Enjoying the Benefits of a Fermented Breakfast

We all want to jumpstart our day when we arise from sleep. The best way to do that is with a power packed breakfast. Many express though, that they don’t have much time.

Breakfast is important to start out your day with. Eating the right foods for breakfast can help you control a healthy weight, keep cholesterol down, helps left your mood, and can control cravings for junk food.

Check out the breakfast ideas below that are fast, easy and delicious. The recipes contain fermented ingredients, making them even healthier, as fermented or cultured food adds good bacteria (probiotics) to your diet.

The lack of good bacteria has now been linked to digestive problems, asthma, obesity, diabetes (type II), and many more chronic disease.

Good bacteria also needs food to eat and thrive. That is where prebiotics come in. The following breakfast ideas contain prebiotic foods, like bananas, blueberries, garlic, and onion.

Other prebiotic sources to consider eating are jicama, artichokes, asparagus, leeks, chicory root, Jerusalem artichokes, and leafy greens including dandelion greens.

Avocado and Mango SmoothieAvocado Mango and Kefir Smoothie

2/3 cup avocado flesh (1 medium avocado)

2/3 cup mango (1 medium mango)

2 cups plain kefir

Procedure:

Blend everything together until smooth and pour in two serving glasses. You can add one banana or a handful of blueberries for added sweetness and flavor.

Scrambled Tempeh

1 pound cubed tempeh

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1 small bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 small onion, thinly sliced

3 garlic cloves, minced

1/4 teaspoon Himalayan salt (or sea salt)

Freshly grated black pepper

Preheat a large pan over medium heat. When the pan is warm enough, add in the oil then sauté the cubed tempeh for about 7 minutes or until lightly browned. Make sure you keep stirring for even cooking.

Pour in remaining oil and add bell pepper and onion. Sauté for another 5 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Add garlic and stir for another minute.

Season with salt and pepper. Serve the scrambled tempeh with wheat toast.

Fruity Muesli with Yogurt

1/2 cup plain yogurt

1/4 cup muesli

1/2 cup blueberries (frozen or fresh)

1/4 cup diced bananas

1/4 cup diced apples

A teaspoon of organic raw honey-cinnamon, organic maple syrup

Mix all the ingredients together and enjoy. Easy, right? What’s great about this recipe is you can make it the night before and put it in a mason jar so you can grab it and go in the morning if you are pressed with time.

Salami and Cheese Frittatas

Salami and Cheese Frittatas

Image Credit: Two Peas and Their Pod

1 to 2 teaspoons of olive oil

6 eggs

100 grams of chopped salami

1/2 cup green peas

1/2 cup cream cheese

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brush a 6-cup muffin pan with oil.

Mix together salami, cheese and green peas in a bowl. Divide the mixture between 6 holes in muffin pan.

Whisk the eggs and cream together in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the egg and cream mixture over salami mixture.

Bake for 25 minutes. Cool slightly before removing the frittatas from the muffin pan.

The recipes above are all good for you, not to mention delicious. These are a great way to add fermented foods into your diet. Enjoy!

 

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