Peach Mango Salsa

 

Peach Mango Salsa

 

Are you excited about salsas like we are here at Splendid Recipes and More? If you don’t like tomatoes, this salsa’s for you.

If you’ve never made such a salsa, Peach Mango Salsa, then your in for a treat. But maybe your thinking, “This looks good, but I’ll stick with my favorite store bought Peach Mango Salsa.” OK will you do that, but look what’s in that store bought salsa:

Tomatoes, Mango, Water Filtered, Peppers, Chilies and Peppers, Onions, Cane Juice Evaporated, Tomatoes Puree, Peaches, Cilantro, Vinegar Red Wine, Salt, Lemon Juice, Spices, Citric Acid, Sodium Metabisulfite, Sodium Erythorbate, Xanthan Gum.

Did you notice I high-lighted the last four ingredients? Will that’s not in our Peach Mango Salsa.

Here is what you will need:

2 medium peaches, peeled, de-seed, chopped

1 large mango, peeled, de-seed, chopped

½ cup green onions, diced (about 3 scallions)

½ red bell pepper, diced

1 Serrano pepper, de-seed, minced

½ cup cilantro, chopped

½ tsp. salt

1 tbsp. sugar

1 tbsp. lime juice or ¼ of a lime

If your not sure on how to cut a mango, we added this video from – Special Fork Videos – to show you how.

Prepare the peaches and mango and place them into a medium mixing bowl along with the diced onion and bell pepper. Do not mix. Next add the Serrano pepper and chopped cilantro, again do not mix.

Together add salt, sugar and lime juice. Now stir the mixture until well incorporated.

Let mixture set for 15 minutes at room temperature for flavors to infuse, or refrigerate until ready to eat.

This salsa keeps in a mason jar, for 4-5 days in the fridge, or can be frozen for later use. If you use plastic to store the salsa, it will be fresh for just about 2 days.

Serve the salsa with white or yellow corn chips, grilled chicken, grilled fish or any Mexican meal (Link here for some ideas from our blog).

 

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Mexican Huevos Divorciados

Huevos Divorciados

Mexican cuisine is a mix of indigenous Mesoamerican cooking with European, especially Spanish, elements added after the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire in the 16th century. The basic food ingredients remain the same, or what is native to the culture, such as corn, beans and chili peppers, but the Europeans introduced a large number of other foods, which were meat from domesticated animals (beef, pork, chicken, goat and sheep), dairy products (especially cheese) and various herbs and spices.

With the introduction of the chicken, came the egg and in turn the modern day breakfast that is called Huevos divorciados, which  is Spanish for divorced eggs. It’s a breakfast mostly found in Mexico City and features two fried eggs separated by a column of refried beans. In some homes of Mexico they will replace the beans with chilaquiles. Typically, one egg is covered in salsa roja or red salsa, while the other is covered in salsa verde or green salsa.

Here is what you will need for the featured recipe:

½ cup avocado oil – smoke point 500 degrees- (you can use vegetable oil, but is high in omega-6 which is inflammation causing to the body, olive oil has a low smoke point -350 degrees-)

2 corn tortillas

2 large eggs

¼ cup green salsa

¼ cup red salsa

½ cup pinto or black beans, cooked

step by step Huevos Devorciados

Place a small frying pan on medium high and heat oil. With a pair of cooking tongs dip tortillas one at a time to fry, but not crisp; about 1 to 1 ½ minutes. Allow oil to drip off and place onto plate. Allow tortillas to overlap each other.

Remove all but a small amount of oil from pan. Return pan to heat and crack both eggs into pan. Place lid over eggs and cook sunny side up style; about 2 to 3 minutes. Turn eggs onto tortillas, making sure egg is lying in center.

Next spoon beans over top of eggs, also centering the beans over the eggs. On one side of the beans, spoon on the red salsa. Next spoon the green salsa on the other side.

Recipe is for 1 swerving. Follow the instructions doubling ingredients to serve 2.

 

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Fresh Mexican Salsa

Fresh Mexican Salsa

Salsa is good nutrition and a condiment . The tomatoes, provide Vitamin C and significant amounts of Vitamins A and B which includes niacin, and riboflavin. The minerals to consider are magnesium, phosphorous, calcium, chromium, and foliate.

Chilies play a prominent role in Mexican cuisine and there is much more to them than just being hot or spicy to the palate. They contain anti-oxidants and are high in vitamin C, B-6 and other trace minerals.  Chilies naturally raise metabolic rate. Its active ingredient, capsaicin, generates heat and also increase heart rate when consumed, both of which help to burn calories. Medical studies done with capsaicin  using red bell peppers and chilies, reported that capsaicin can suppress the appetite.

The World Health Organization (WHO) supports the use of onions for the treatment of poor appetite, the prevention of atherosclerosis, the treatments of coughs, colds, asthma and bronchitis. To finish it off, limes or lemons have high levels of Vitamin C, Vitamin B-6, potassium, folic acid and flavonoids.

Salsa is a meal in itself with all that nutrition. Enjoy the video!!

Fresh Mexican Salsa

5 red tomatoes chopped, medium sized

½ medium yellow onion, diced

3 Serrano peppers, diced

½ cup cilantro, chopped

¼ cup lemon juice

Remove the seeds from the tomatoes and Serrano peppers (leave ribs for a mildly hotter salsa, if not remove ribs as well). Chop and dice the onion, tomato and peppers. Mix in a medium bowl. Add lemon juice and mix in until well incorporated. Fill two mason jars and store in refrigerator for up to 10 days.

Enjoy with tortilla chips or any Mexican meal.

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