Excite Your Palate with Spice Roasted Vegetables

Excite Your Palate with Spice Roasted Vegetables

Spicing up vegetables is a sure way to add flavor and taste, even for those who are picky about eating them. Roasting the vegetables with spices caramelizes the seasoning while sealing in the flavor.

The spices enzymes and chemicals will be absorbed into the vegetables during roasting.

Finding the right spice and roasting style will make everyone want seconds.

To evenly coat the vegetables with a dry spice mix is best to mix in a little olive oil or if you wish to use a neutral flavored oil avocado oil could be used.

The best way to do this is add the oil and spices to the bottle of the mixing bowl first, then add the vegetables and mix.

Here are some ideas of what vegetables and spices to roast together.

Moroccan Style Spice Rub

Moroccan-Style Spice Rub

Photo by Scott Phillips

This spice mix will give vegetables a Moroccan blast of flavor.

This warm to the palate spice mix pairs especially well with sweeter or starchy vegetables such as butternut squash, carrots, cauliflower, potatoes and sweet potatoes.

2 tsp. ground cumin

1 tsp. ground coriander

1/2 tsp. chili powder

1/2 tsp. sweet paprika, preferably Hungarian

1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp. ground allspice

1/4 tsp. ground ginger

1/8 tsp. cayenne

A pinch of ground clove

In a small mason jar, mix all 10 spices.

To a large bowl add 1 teaspoon of the spice mix and 1 or 2 tablespoons of olive oil, add diced or chopped vegetables, and mix well.

Rosemary Thyme Lemon Oil

Rosemary and thyme Mix this infused oil with your vegetables before roasting to give them extra flavor. It’s a delectable complement to roasted beet, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrots and cauliflower.

Zest of 1 large lemon, removed in long strips with a vegetable peeler

2 tbs. extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed

1 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary

1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme

Over medium-low heat in a small saucepan, combine the lemon zest and oil. Cook until the lemon zest bubbles steadily for about 30 seconds.

Remove from heat and let cool, about 3 minutes. Stir in the herbs and let sit 20 minutes more before using. This allows for flavors to infuse.

Chop or dice the vegetables, add Rosemary Thyme Lemon Oil to large bowl, add vegetables and mix to coat well.

Rosemary and thyme are often used in meat dishes as well. Like roast beef and pork. Both herbs also work well with beans, cabbage, poultry, soups, and stews.

Ginger Lemon Soy Infusion

Give roasted vegetables an Asian flavor by mixing them up with this savory infusion. Try roasting it with: broccoli, beets, carrots and cauliflower.

1-inch piece fresh ginger

1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

½ tsp. soy sauce

Set a small fine strainer in a small bowl. Peel and finely grate the ginger. Put the grated ginger in the strainer and extract the ginger juice by pressing the ginger in the sieve with the back of a small spoon.

Transfer ½ teaspoon of ginger juice to another small bowl and discard the rest or save for another use. Stir in the lemon juice and soy sauce. Toss with a batch of vegetables after roasting.

With this spice mix so the flavor is not robbed by the strong flavor of olive oil, roast your vegetables with avocado oil, which has a neutral flavor.

Garlic and Coriander Oil

Garlic coriander This tasteful, spiced oil is made to be tossed with roasted vegetables as soon as they come out of the oven.

It tosses well with: roasted asparagus, roasted beets, broccoli, cauliflower or green beans.

Have this infused flavored oil ready as soon as the roasted vegetables are out of the oven.

1-1/2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

1 tbsp. finely chopped garlic (2 large cloves)

2 tsp. ground coriander

1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Himalayan salt and freshly ground black pepper

Set a small saucepan over medium-low heat, with combined olive oil and garlic. Cook until the smaller pieces of garlic turn light golden-brown, about 3 minutes.

Stir in the coriander and cook for about 20 seconds. Immediately remove from the heat and transfer to a small heatproof bowl to prevent overcooking. Keep warm.

Sprinkle the roasted vegetables with the lemon juice, season to taste with salt and pepper, and arrange on a serving platter. Spoon the toasted garlic oil over the vegetables.

For best results, we recommend using high-quality dried herbs, as they will not contribute to spoilage, and you will have a longer-lasting product.

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The Smoke Point of Oils

Smoke Point of Cooking Oils

 All oils used in the kitchen contain varying smoke points. That is the temperature at which they start to smoke and break down. Heating the oil beyond this point can cause toxic fumes and free radicals that are able to harm your body.

The more refined the oil, the higher the smoke point.

The following image shows the healthiest oils to consume as well as their smoke point.

Healthiest Oils to consume

Avocado oil when refined has a smoke point to 500 degrees. Almond oil also is a high heat oil to 450 degrees as well as coconut oil to 450 degrees. Extra virgin olive oil only has a smoke point to 350 degrees. Olive oil is best used as a salad oil or dipping oil.

Remember: Anytime you cook with oil, you risk overheating it, which can lead to the formation of unhealthy compounds. When your oil starts to change color, that’s a sign that it’s starting to degrade from to much heat.

Seed oils are not healthy for consumption. These include: corn, soybean, canola oil, sunflower, grape seed, and safflower.

Most vegetable oils today are made from GMO’s or Genetically modified Organisms. Many independent scientific studies have shown them to be toxic to our bodies.

Canola Oil, Vegetable Oil, and Corn Oil are oils high in omega 6 fatty acids, which in excessive amounts are actually bad for your heart.

For more information read these related articles: Food Breaking News  –  Livestrong – Health risks of Corn Oil   –  Health Line News – USDA Clears the Way for Corn, Soybeans Able to withstand an Herbicide in Agent Orange

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