Gluten-Free Flour Substitutions For Baking

Going wheat free doesn’t mean you have to give up breads, cookies and pizza.

There are many flours you can use to substitute in recipes that have delicious results.

Here is a general guide to substituting flour in recipes.

There are a variety of different formulas you can try when substituting wheat flour. Experiment to see what works and tastes best for you.

Gluten-free floursOne thing to note, though, is that alternative flours don’t produce the same texture or consistency as regular wheat flour.

With the lack of gluten, you will need to add a starch to your GF flour.

Know let’s see what these Gf flour substitutes are and the starch’s to use.

Gluten-free (GF) non-wheat flours are generally categorized into three different weights, and these include:

  1. Light starch
  2. All-purpose medium
  3. Heavier whole grain

Light Gluten Free Flours

Light, starchy GF flours include:

  1. sweet rice flour
  2. white rice flour

Medium Gluten Free Flours

Medium GF flours are similar to ‘all purpose flour’- these include:

  1. sorghum flour
  2. oat flour, certified gluten-free
  3. brown rice flour, superfine

If you are unable to find sorghum flour, certified gluten-free oat flour will be your is closest option.

Heavier GF Flours

The heavier grains, including psuedo-grains like quinoa, tend to contain more protein.

Which include:

  1. buckwheat
  2. quinoa
  3. millet
  4. cornmeal
  5. nut meal (such as almond and coconut)
  6. bean/legume flours

These heavier GF flours are similar to baking with whole wheat flour. You get a similar denser product, often darker in color, and with less rise.

Starches To Use With GF Flours

Starches in gluten-free bakingGluten is a general name for the proteins found in wheat. It helps baked foods maintain their shape, acting as a glue, holding food ingredients together.

In gluten-free baking, a starch needs to be substituted. These include:

  1. tapioca starch
  2. cornstarch
  3. potato starch
  4. arrowroot starch

Here are some key points to know about starch in general, and specific differences for using each one.

  • Starches need time to hydrate before going in the oven so rest your batter or dough for up to 30 minutes for improved texture of some baked goods.
  • The high starch content of some gluten free flours can result in a gritty texture. Many batters and doughs benefit from more liquid to properly hydrate.
  • More liquid may then require a longer baking time in some recipes.

Starches for the most part are interchangeable.

Cornstarch

  • This powdery white cornstarch is not the same as corn flour. Do not substitute.
  • Not ideal for baking, too much cornstarch results in baked goods with a starchy texture.
  • Stirring too vigorously may cause a mixture to break down and thin out.
  • Cooking over high heat can cause lumping.
  • Best uses for baking: to thicken pie filling and make puddings.

Potato Starch

  • Made from raw potatoes it has no potato taste. Potato starch is not the same as potato flour. Do not substitute.
  • Provides structure, tenderness and binding power in baking.
  • Too much potato starch gives baked goods a crumbly texture.
  • Best uses: muffins, quick breads and a gluten free flour mix.

Tapioca Starch

  • Tapioca starch is all starch but is also called tapioca flour in recipes. It is the same ingredient.
  • Gives chewy texture, elasticity and structure to baked goods.
  • Aids in creating a crisp crust.
  • Can be used as a thickener for pies and sauces.
  • Too much tapioca starch makes baked goods dense.
  • Best uses: cookies, a flour blend and moist breads

Arrowroot Starch

Arrowroot is extremely versatile and can even be used as a substitute for wheat flour.

It works well when mixed with other gluten free flours like almond flour and coconut flour and is perfect for bread or cake recipes.

  • no break down in acidic ingredients
  • creates a clear gel
  • freezes well and thaws properly
  • when using eggs as the primary binder, adding arrowroot powder will significantly help the process
  • lightens the textures in cakes, quick bread, and cookies in gluten-free and grain-free baking

As you can see, different starches will contribute different textures to your baking.

Take Care When Using Coconut Flour

Coconut flour is a unique, non-grain, fiber rich and highly absorbent flour. If you add it to a recipe blend, you may need to add more fat or liquid.

Therefore, you cannot substitute coconut flour on a 1:1 ratio for all-purpose flour, or most other GF flours.

Coconut flour gluten-free baking

Typically you would combine 1/4 cup coconut flour with almond flour, hazelnut flour, cassava flour and a little tapioca starch for the best flavor and baking properties.

Using coconut flour will require one egg extra in the recipe for each 1/4 cup, for both moisture and structure.

First, incorporate the egg yolks into the coconut flour and other dry ingredients.

Whip the egg whites separately, and fold them into the first mixture to make baked goods lighter.

You may also need to increase other liquids in the recipe or make small adjustments to baking times.

A substitute for coconut flour can be flax-meal, cornmeal, and almond meal.

If you want added fiber and texture in your baked goods, add 1/4 cup flax seed meal to your GF flour blend.

Gluten-free Recipes To Try For Yourself

Gluten-Free Chocolate Peppermint Cupcakes

Gluten Free Iron Skillet Pecan Coconut Cake

Gluten Free Mexican Chocolate Pumpkin Pie

Gluten Free Blueberry Lemon Bread

Gluten Free Tropical Carrot Cake

Gluten free Tropical Carrot Cake - Dessert Bread and CupcakesGluten is a vital protein to wheat. But many people without knowing it are allergic to it. Those who are bothered by gluten can suffer from digestive problems, skin problems, and even depression, too name a few.

There are alternative flours that do not contain gluten, and if you make them a part of your diet, they could help to improve your health.

Watch the video to learn what these alternatives are. After the video we have provided a gluten free recipe: Tropical Carrot Cake.

 

Here is what you will need for the featured recipe:

flours used for Gluten Free Tropical Carrot CakeFirst preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

As shown in the image above, mix the potato starch and both flours in a large bowl with the following ingredients. mixed dry ingredients for Gluten free Tropical Carrot CakeThere is no need to sift the dry ingredients. When mixed together set bowl aside:

1/2 tsp powdered ginger root

1 tsp sea salt

2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 tsp baking soda

1 tsp Xanthan Gum

Xanthan gum can be a little spendy so you can substitute it for any starch, like arrow root, corn, or tapioca. The xanthan gum or any one of these starches are needed to replace the gluten. The starch or xanthan gum holds the flours together.

coating a glass baking pan with butter and sugarNext, coat a 7 x 4 inch glass baking pan with butter and sugar, set aside.

mixing wet ingredients for Gluten Free Tropical Carrot CakeNext, in a large bowl mix together eggs, sugars, oil, yogurt and vanilla. Add flour mixture slowly until just blended. With a large spatula, stir in carrots, pineapple, coconut, and nuts. Pour batter into baking pan ½ inch from top. Any extra batter can be used to make cupcakes (it should make 7).

Bake 45-50 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. Bake cupcakes for 15 to 20 minutes. Cool on wire rack. Remove cake from pan.

Gluten free Tropical Carrot Cake - Dessert Bread and Cupcakes

For the frosting combine 1/3 cup cream cheese, 2 cups powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons almond milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. Beat together until smooth. Frost cake when completely cooled. Save aside a small amount of frosting and mix half  with food grade orange coloring and the other half with food grade green coloring. Add frosting to a cake piper and pipe onto cake to form carrots and leaves with respective colors.

Gluten Free Tropical Carrot Cake - plattedWhen ready to enjoy your gluten free dessert bread, plate and serve.

 

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