Techniques for Cooking in the Kitchen

Techniques for Cooking in the KitchenMany that prepare food are orthodox cooks, or rather what we mean is they stick to the letter of the recipe, they follow it word for word, and there is nothing wrong with that.

Sometimes following a recipe without knowing why it calls for a certain ingredient including the amount, would leave out the possibilities of being able to enter change ingredients, either to improve on the recipe, or make it more to our liking.

eggs contain percentage of moistureOne such example would be the number of eggs, and the size. How so? A recipe that is for a cake as an example, needs a certain amount of moister, and egg yolks make up about 34 percent of the liquid weight of the egg, as well as the albumen or the egg white makes up about 66 percent of the liquid weight of the egg. The moister content depends on their size.

Therefore if the recipe calls for 3 small eggs, and you add large eggs, you will be adding more moisture to the recipe, offsetting the liquid content. If you did use large eggs, then you would have to add less milk or any other ingredient that would be considered a liquid.

Many of us that are regular chefs in our own kitchen have techniques for preparing recipes that we use regularly. If you are reading this article and are not a frequent cook in the kitchen, maybe you can share these tips with the person in your life who is the cook.

salted or unsalted butterSalted Butter vs. Unsalted Butter

Butter is available both with and without salt. The salt is added for extra flavor and to help preserve it so it has a longer shelf life. The problem is that sometimes the salt in butter can be more than a recipe needs.

Choosing unsalted butter gives you more control over how much salt your dish contains. If you only have salted butter, the best thing to do is omit approximately ¼ teaspoon of salt per ½ cup (one stick) of butter used in the recipe.

Kitchen Scissors

 

Use Kitchen Scissors

Right now you probably only use your kitchen scissors for opening packaging and bags of milk. But next time you’re trimming fat from a roast, opening pitas or cutting chicken into strips, consider using your scissors!

Chefs use them all the time for cutting meats and other food items. It’s probably best to have pair that is designated as food scissors only. Be sure you clean them very well after each use because they do have crevices where bacteria can hide.

Stop Foods from Sticking to the Pan

To keep food from sticking to the bottom of your pans, and this applies if your using butter or oil in the pan, avoid putting cold foods into a hot pan.

Reduce Grease Splatters

Few things are messier than splattering grease. And if it gets on your skin it can be painful. Reduce grease splatters by sprinkling hot grease with salt prior to adding the food to be fried. If this is not completely effective, you can buy grease splatter shields at kitchen stores.

Peel Garlic Easily

Peeling garlic can be frustrating unless you know this little tip that the pros use. Lay a clove flat on a hard surface and then pressing down hard on it with the flat side of a large knife. Once you’ve pressed hard enough you’ll hear a “pop” that tells you the peel has separated. Even with this trick your fingers will undoubtedly smell like garlic. Get rid of that odor by washing them well with salt.

Keep Your Recipes Organized

Nothing is more frustrating when you’re ready to start cooking then not being able to find your recipe. Keep things organized by finding a system for filing your recipes that you can keep close at hand in the kitchen.

Smart Phone and dropboxWhat we do at “Splendid Recipes and More” is use our –Smart Phone– and -Drop Box-.

We have a free account with Drop Box and load all of our recipes to the Box.

When we shopping for ingredients for a certain recipe, we just open the Box with our Smart Phone (internet access needed, you can also use your Tablet, Laptop, and PC) and look up the recipe.

The same is done in the kitchen to follow the instructions or procedures of the recipe, either for preheating the oven or how many eggs to use etc. Here is the link to Drop Box: https://www.dropbox.com/ .

Stop Cheesecake from Cracking

Cheesecakes often crack on the top because they lose moisture while they cook. If you’re adding a topping it doesn’t matter, but if you’re serving the cake without anything on top it’s nice to have it looking perfect. Avoid cracking by putting a small dish of water on the rack beside your cake while it is cooking. This will keep it moist and crack-free!

These are just some techniques we use in our kitchen. What tips or techniques do you use? Let us know in the comments section. Thank You.

 

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Toasted Whole Grain Orange Muffins

Toasted Whole grain Orange Muffins

I found this recipe in the April 2014 magazine –  “Better Homes and Gardens“. The recipe is called Toasty Whole Grain Orange Muffins. But I changed the recipe a little, and I liked the Toasted better then the Toasty.

To me toasty is when you are around a camp fire on a cool night in the mountains and you want to get your hands and feet toasty warm. Or when you pull back the stick with a marshmallow on it, and someone says, “Isn’t that a bit toasty?’

The grains the recipe called for, I toasted them in the oven. So that’s why I used Toasted in place of Toasty.

We did use cooked Quinoa. This recipe is great to prepare, when you have had some quiona with your dinner, and there is some left over, quiona that is.

Quinoa  is a complete protein containing all nine essential amino acids. It also has nine times more fiber than any other whole grain.

This muffin would be great for breakfast for the reasons just mentioned, protein, and fiber. Fiber slows digestion, giving you longer sustained energy, as well as the protein.

Here is what you well need.

ingredients for Toasted Whole Grain Orange Muffins

1 cup regular rolled oats

1 cup cooked quinoa, cooled

1/3 cup finely chopped almonds

1 tablespoon avocado oil

1 cup all-purpose flour

½ cup whole wheat flour

½ cup sugar

1 ½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

 

toasting grains for Toasted Whole Grain Orange Muffins

In a large bowl toss oats, cooled cooked quinoa, and almonds, add oil and toss some more to coat.  Place mixture onto a nonstick cookie sheet or baking pan. Spread out into an even layer. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until toasted, stirring once. Remove; place pan on a wire rack and cool.

Grease a cup cake pan with twelve wells that are 2 1/2-inches round; set aside.

In a large bowl stir together all but 1/4 cup of the quinoa mixture, the all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Make a well in the center of flour mixture; set aside.

whisking wet ingredients

Here is what you will need for the wet ingredients:

2 teaspoons zest of orange

1 ½ teaspoons of orange oil

1/2 cup buttermilk

2 eggs

1/2 cup Greek yogurt

3 tablespoons butter, melted

 

In a 2-cup measure whisk together buttermilk, eggs, sour cream, butter, orange oil, and orange zest. Add all at once to flour mixture. Gently stir just until moistened, the batter should be lumpy.

close up of muffin pan filled with wet muffen mixture

Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups, filling each well, ¾ full. Sprinkle with remaining quinoa mixture. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden brown. Cool in muffin pan on a wire rack for 5 minutes.

Toasted Whole grain Orange Muffins

Serve warm. If desired, serve with orange marmalade.

 

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