Foods That Don’t Need Refrigerating

Some food items we buy are clearly marked to refrigerate after opening, as an example foods like dairy products and meats among others.

There are some items we buy that are not marked as to how to store it once you have it at home in your kitchen.

These food items include the following.

Tomatoes

Storing tomatoes in the refrigerator can make tomatoes dull and mealy.

In his book, “Food and Cooking” – food scientist Harold McGee explains that ripe tomatoes, are especially sensitive to chilling at temperatures below 55ºF and suffer damage to their membranes that results in minimal flavor development, blotchy coloration, and a soft, mealy texture when they’re brought back to room temperature.

Store them on the counter (under-ripe ones can go on the windowsill).

If your tomato is a little overripe, putting it in the fridge will stop the ripening process preventing issues like mold.

Serious Eats tested over ripe tomatoes by storing them in the refrigerator, and the results showed that the flavor was not negatively impacted by the cold.

If they ripen to fast on the counter top, you could roast them and make them into tomato sauce.

Serious Eats is an award-winning food and drink website, visited by hungry readers every month to view rigorously tested recipes, science-driven cooking techniques, and robust equipment reviews.

Read more here about:

How To Grow Tomatoes By Seed

Indeterminate Or Determinate Tomatoes – Which Is Right For Your Garden?

Melon

Keep whole melons like watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew on the counter for best flavor.

USDA research found that storage of melons at room temp may even help keep the antioxidants better intact.

Some supermarkets sell half melons, these should be stored in the refrigerator and used within 3 to 4 days.

What happens if you leave a cut melon out?

Dispose of any cut melon pieces left out for longer than 2 hours. Bacteria can begin to grow on the cut melon if it is not refrigerated.

This can lead to spoilage and food poisoning. Be sure to throw out any melon left out at room temperature for more than 2 hours instead of storing it.

As a general rule, you should not keep melon for more than a week unless you intend to freeze it.

With your bought melon why not try this recipe out: Watermelon Goat Cheese Salad

Avocado

Keeping avocados in the refrigerator halts the ripening process so never store them in the refrigerated. Just put them on the counter at room temperature.

If they are already ripe then use them immediately.

To ripen avocados, we suggest you put them in a brown paper bag along with an two to three apples or bananas for a few days until ripe.

The apple or banana releases ethylene gas which causes the avocados to ripen more quickly.

Once your avocados are ripe, try this recipe: Citrus Fennel and Avocado Salad

Potatoes

Cold temperatures will break down the starches in potatoes, making them unpleasantly sweet and gritty.

It is best to store them in the dark we’re it is cool and dry.

When your ready to use your potatoes try this recipe: Organic BBQ Hot Dogs and Potato Pack

Onions

Storing uncut onions in the refrigerator can make them moldy and mushy.

Without their exterior layers intact, cut onions are susceptible to bacteria and mold.

To reuse a cut onion, you’ll need to prepare it correctly, choose an appropriate container, and store it at the right temperature.

If you have half of an onion remaining or a few large wedges, then wrap them tightly in plastic wrap.

Plastic wrap will insulate the onion from the outside air while helping it retain moisture.

Store the cut wrapped onion in your refrigerator at or below 40 °F (4 °C).

Do not at room temperature. Keeping them at a low temperature inhibits the growth of bacteria and allows you to safely reuse them later.

Garlic

Preserve the powerful flavor of garlic by storing in a cool, dry and ventilated container.

Once the head has been broken open, use the cloves within 10 days.

You seriously need to try this delicious plate: Asparagus with Garlic and Smoked Bacon

Coffee

Never store ground coffee or coffee beans in the fridge or freezer.

Coffee Beans-Finding You’re Favorite Coffee

Starbucks states that roasted coffee beans should be kept at room temperature. They go on to say when you store it in the freezer or refrigerator, moisture condenses on the coffee and can extract the flavor.

The fridge and freezer are far too humid and will make your coffee tasteless and less aromatic.

Read more here about Coffee-Grinding Tips and Facts

Hard Cheese

If you’re a cheese connoisseur then you probably already know this, but hard cheeses should never go in the fridge.

Parmigiano Reggiano cheese on a table top

It may sound odd as cheese is a dairy product. But if hard cheese is left in the fridge then it turns from hard to rock hard.

Hard cheese goes through a curing process that takes about six months or more to complete (depending on the hard cheese being cured).

After its cured, there is no need to keep it chilled. Just store it in a cool, dark place like your pantry or cupboard.

Other cheeses not aged need to be refrigerated, so make sure to check if it has been aged or not.

Read more here about the Top Nine Varieties Of Cheese’s Enjoyed By Food Lovers

Apples

Freshly picked apples will do well on your counter or in a fruit bowl.

If they aren’t eaten after a week or two, make them last a little bit longer by then chilling them in the fridge.

If you love apple pie, you’ll like the flavor of Baked Apples Apple Pie

Berries

Fresh berries from your local farm taste amazing at room temperature so it’s the sooner the better for munching.

For long-term storage keep them in the fridge.

To avoid soggy or moldy berries, rinse just before eating.

After you rinse them, try the berries in this recipe: Berries and Vanilla Pudding Pie

Stone Fruit

Allow peaches, apricots, nectarines and plums to ripen at room temperature.

If you don’t use them right away, place them in the fruit bin of the refrigerator for a few extra days.

This recipe is wonderful with fresh peaches (can use frozen): Peach and Pecan Cake

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup

Maybe we are being to fancy with naming the recipe. The idea did start with our visit to My Yellow Farmhouse, no not my farmhouse but Cecile’s yellow farmhouse. Well actually her blog ( My Yellow Farmhouse).

She has a wonderful soup recipe, “Slightly-Spicy Three Bean, Tomato and Kale Soup.” We had some kale on hand, went to the Whole Foods Market for a few more things, arrived home and started cooking.

In Cecile’s soup she used Italian seasonings, and a can of crushed tomatoes with Italian herbs. She stated she liked to use Contadina.

But we decided to change things up a bit. We used some unprecedented spices in our soup, well at least I personally have not seen it done before. The spices we used, are used in Moroccan recipes as well as North African dishes.

The spices are a mix of organic spices and they include, Coriander, Cinnamon, Cumin, Lavender, Fennel, Pepper, Cayenne, Cloves, and Cardamon. We also used a can of fire roasted tomatoes.

Thanks to Cecile and My Yellow Farmhouse for the soup idea, and here is what we did and what you will need.

3/4 cup chopped mini-sweet peppers, red, yellow, and orange

3/4 cup chopped red onion

2 Tbs. olive oil

rinsing the beans2 large cloves garlic, minced

3 cups baby kale leaves, chopped

1 can – 15.5 ounce kidney beans, drained and rinsed

1 can – 15.5 ounces black beans, drained and rinsed

1 can – 15.5 ounces garbanzo beans – drained and rinsed

1 32 ounce container free range chicken broth, low salt

1 can – 28 ounces fire roasted tomatoes, with no added spices or herbs

2 tablespoons Ras El Hanout (find this at Whole Foods in the Spice and Herbs section for $2.79 as of 2015)

1/2 teaspoon Himalayan salt

sauteing the onion and sweet peppersPlace a  6 to 8 quart soup pot over medium heat and add oil. Allow to warm, add onions, and sweet peppers and saute about 5 minutes. Next add garlic and continue to saute.

add the fire roasted tomatoesOnce you smell the garlic, stop sauteing and add the beans, broth and tomatoes, and mix until well incorporated.

adding the spicesNext add the spice, and salt. Mix in. Let simmer on low for about 20 minutes.

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup in a soup potYou can either add the kale while simmering, or wait after 20 minutes then add the kale stir in wait 5 minutes and serve. The leaves will cook a little, but there will be more color to the presentation of the soup.

This soup, like any sauces and salsas, taste better after 24 to 48 hours, giving time for the spices to be absorbed into the finished product.

Moroccan Three Bean and Kale Soup - close up

How ever you chose to finish the soup, once done, ladle into a soup bowl and enjoy.

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