Which Tomato Will You Grow For Your Homemade Sauce

Which Tomato Will You Grow For Your Homemade Sauce

With thousands of tomato varieties available today, selecting the variety of tomatoes you want to grow in your garden can seem like an overwhelming project. Tomatoes are very diverse, as each variety offers up its own unique set of characteristics, such as flavor, size, and even color.

Is your objective for growing tomatoes to serve up tasty tomato sauce, then it would be well worth knowing that some varieties, not all, are better suited for making the sauce.

There are some speciers of tomatoes that have few seeds in their flesh, and a firm meaty texture. Let’s take a look at 5 varieties that fit the bill for a tasty tomato sauce. These 5 varieties of tomatoes may be familiar to you, and possible not.

Great Choices Of Tomatoes For Your Perfect Sauce

Russian Big Roma

Russian Big Roma at a Farmers Market

Russian Big Roma

The University Of California – Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners program says the Russian Big Roma is disease-resisting, and a favorite heirloom paste variety, as well as using to make sauces.

Unlike most paste and sauce tomatoes, this is an indeterminate variety which produces lots of large (2 x 4 inch), dark red fruit, with a splendid “tomatoey” flavor.

San Marzano

Compared to the Roma tomato, the San Marzano tomatoes are thinner and more pointed. The flesh is much thicker with fewer seeds, and the taste is stronger, sweeter and less acidic. Expert tomato growers describe the taste as bittersweet.

Again, the Mater Gardener’s program says the San Marzano is a “Tomato Festival” favorite.

This Italian tomato variety produces an 8 ounce, deep red fruit, that is 4 inches in length. And though the San Marzano in the raw or uncooked has a lot to be desired in respects to flavor, the process of cooking them down to make sauce releases magic qualities, and therefore you will want to grow them year after year.

Polish Linguisa

Polish Linguisa tomato

Image credit: Tomato Geeks

The Polish Linguisa is a variety of tomato from Eastern Europe, and it was brought to the USA by Polish gardeners in the 1800’s.

This particular tomato has bright red fruit, and according to the Tomato Geeks, it has a broad range of uses:

  • Paste
  • Sauce
  • Canning
  • Drying
  • Freezing

Jersey Devil

one half pound Jersy Devil tomato

Image Credit: Teresa Giovanzana

The Jersey Devil tomato is a extremely prolific producer of 4-5” long, bright red fruit that are shaped like banana peppers.

They are very meaty and sweet, with few seeds. The Master Gardeners say it is an excellent tomato for canning as well as eating fresh.

Teresa Giovanzana boasts a 1/2 pound Jersey Devil in the 2013 tomato season.

Amish Paste

Amish Paste tomatoes produce bright red fruit up to 12 ounces that vary greatly in shape from ox-heart to a rounded plum shape.

From the Pennsylvania Amish (USA), the tomato is a large, meaty, bright red heirloom with superior taste, and a nice balance of sweet and acid.

The Amish Paste has been chosen by Organic Gardening magazine as a top paste tomato, as it is juicier than most other paste tomato varieties. Though it is a great tomato to make paste, it also is worth eating straight from the garden. Add some to your favorite salad or sandwich, but make sure you save enough to makes lots of thick and full-bodied sauce!

Tomatoes on VineAll the tomato varieties above are – indeterminate, also called vining tomatoes. The plant will grow continuously until it dies, usually in Fall with the first deep frost.

Once they produce flowers and set tomatoes they will do so continuously until the plant dies.

The five tomato varieties that we reviewed, is far from comprehensive, as there are lots of other terrific choices that can be used to make succulent pastes and sauces.

These tomatoes are a great starting point, because you can easily find seeds at your local garden centers or online. Try adding some or all of them to your garden this year for truly outstanding results during harvest time.

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National Popcorn Day 2015

National Popcorn Day 2015The Washington Post say, “The powers that pop have decreed that Monday is National Popcorn Day. Though the origins of the “holiday” are unclear…”

Popcorn also called by popping corn, is a type of corn that expands from the kernel and puffs up or pops when heated. The kernel can pop because it has a hard moisture-sealed hull and a dense starchy interior. As it is heated, pressure builds up within the kernel, and a small explosion is the result. Some varieties of corn are now cultivated specifically as popping corns, and we say Ya!! The more popcorn, the more we can eat on this day National Popcorn Day.

During the Great Depression, popcorn was really cheap at about 5 cents a bag. While other businesses failed during the Depression, the popcorn business thrived and became a source of income for many struggling farmers. During World War II, candy production went down because of sugar rations, and Americans compensated by eating three times as much popcorn as they had before.

national-popcorn-day-2015-popcorn-served-at-the-movies-since-1912Popcorn is a popular snack food at sporting events and in cinemas, where it has been served since 1912 (USA).

Depending on how popcorn is prepared or cooked, it can be considered a health food. Make sure though, if possible to use non GMO popcorn. You can find some non GMO popcorn here on-line at Tropical Traditions.

Bob’s Red Mill (a national famous organic food brand) also offers packaged organic non GMO popcorn.

Our favorite popcorn is Caramel Popcorn. We found this recipe that goes a bit further and adds apples. We found this recipe at Cookies and Cups .

Caramel Apple Popcorn

Makes about 14 cups caramel corn

Caramel Apple Popcorn

Photo Credit: Cookies and Cups

1 cup unpopped corn kernels

2 (2.5 oz) bags of apple chips

1 cup light brown sugar

1 cup light corn syrup

½ cup butter

1 tsp salt

1 (14 oz ) can of sweetened condensed milk

Preheat oven to 250°

In an air popper, pop your kernels into a large bowl. Pick out any unpopped kernels.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine brown sugar, butter, corn syrup and salt. Heat until melted and begins to boil. Once boiling, pour in your can of sweetened condensed milk and stir continuously for 5 minutes, to prevent burning.

Remove from heat and pour directly over popcorn and apples, stirring until coated evenly.

Place in preheated oven and bake for 45-50 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes to cook evenly.

Remove from oven, break into pieces and allow to cool.

Notes from Cookies and Cups:

Store in an airtight container for about a week.

You don’t have to bake this caramel corn if you prefer it softer and chewier. But if you don’t bake it, it will remain fairly sticky.

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